School of Education adapts to e-learning

Thanks to faculty support and innovation, students in the School of Education are gaining valuable technical skills that are sure to come in handy in the age of e-learning. Here are a few examples of adaptations during the COVID-19 pandemic:

Dr. John Somers and Dr. Nancy Steffel have been working with partner school districts (MSD Decatur Township and MSD Perry Township) to support their students and teachers as they transition to e-learning. In turn, they are showing elementary education students how to create lessons on their respective learning management systems.

School of Education is making use of online resources in times of pandemic.

Dr. Somers is teaching ELED 202: Universal Design for Learning: STEM to sophomore students. He is working with four fourth-grade teachers at West Newton Elementary in Decatur Townships who are now using Zoom to connect with the class. Collaboratively, they are building a kid-friendly lesson and a teacher lesson (“How to Build a Mars Land Rover”) with tiers for students with low, medium and high readiness. These lessons will be posted and returned on Canvas, Decatur’s Learning Management System.

Zoom Chat with the School of Education

Dr. Steffel is teaching EDUC 336: Teaching Literacy in the Intermediate Grades to juniors. She is leading an exercise that involves having the students create mini-video lessons and post them for fourth graders at Blue Academy in Decatur Township. She is using Zoom in her class daily and the students are posting their lesson on Canvas, Decatur’s Learning Management System. Greyhounds are being asked to consider the production value of their videos in addition to the content of the lesson.

 

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Dr. Angie Ridgway and her son Nate Ridgway ’14 (history and special education), co-authors of Don’t Ditch That Tech, have been offering support for K-12 teachers from across the country related to their need to transition to remote learning and remote teaching. They are offering virtual office hours and additional conference presentations, in addition to resource materials on their blog (teachingfromtheridge.com).

Ditch That Text hard cover book.

School of Occupational Therapy employs creativity in time of pandemic

160 Over 90 photo not yet fully cropped or toned! Please check before using, especially in print. Health Pavilion

As UIndy moves through this challenging time of uncertainty amid the COVID-19 pandemic, our faculty and staff are working to ensure our students can continue their academic work. This is especially difficult for students who need to complete clinical experiences required for graduation. The School of Occupational Therapy has developed a creative solution for Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) students to complete their required fieldwork.

In cooperation with BeWell, UIndy’s employee wellness program, UIndy MOT students will be offering UIndy employees and their families free telehealth OT sessions focusing on wellness and daily occupations. Please note that participants must reside in the state of Indiana to adhere to licensure laws. The 30-45 minute sessions will be conducted by MOT students with supervision of licensed occupational therapy clinicians and faculty.  

“We have a commitment to our students to continue to provide meaningful fieldwork experiences,” said Jayson Zeigler, Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) academic fieldwork coordinator. “This experience will not only provide a needed service to our UIndy community, but will also introduce our students to the growing applications of telehealth.”

Third-year MOT student Hannah Masemore is grateful for the opportunity. Before the COVID-19 pandemic caused the suspension of all student clinical experiences, Masemore was working on an inpatient rehabilitation unit at the Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana, Illinois. 

I think it’s pretty amazing that we are able to provide OT services via telehealth during this difficult time,” Masemore said. “This is a service that many people still need and this allows them to receive the services while staying safe.”

Masemore suggested that people who could benefit from the free OT telehealth service include:

  • older adults who need a home safety evaluation or aging in place modifications; 
  • people who are working from home and want guidance on ergonomic adaptations to their workstations; 
  • people who were receiving outpatient OT to provide exercise education; 
  • children who were receiving school OT for things such as handwriting; \
  • people receiving OT services for mental health. 

All sessions are confidential and HIPPA compliant. The service is available to any UIndy employee and their family members who live in the state of Indiana. The program will launch on March 30. Anyone interested in signing up should look for an email from BeWell and access the sign-in link on the BeWell website. Questions can be directed to  Jayson Zeigler at zeiglerjw@uindy.edu or Katherine Matutes at matutesk@uindy.edu.

The Art Song Project: February 28-29

art song agendaThis weekend is the culmination of “The Art Song Project.” University of Indianapolis student and alumni poets, composers and visual artists have been collaborating since the fall to make songs and music videos, to be premiered by student performers Friday, February 28th. This kicks off a weekend of song & poetry activities, including guest appearances by beloved UIndy poet and Professor Emerita, Alice Friman. Please join members of the UIndy Art, Music and English departments, as well as students, for the new songs and art, and Alice’s poetry reading Saturday! Event descriptions below:

Friday, February 28, 2020, 2:00-4:00pm, Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center: UIndy Student Art Song Recital/Workshop

UIndy students in Music, English, Photography, and Visual Communication and Design have been working since fall term on The Art Song Project. Composers have been turning poets’ poems into songs. Art students have created photographic video responses to the poems and music, and VCD students have designed this special recital’s program and marketing. Join us for a recital-workshop-discussion featuring live premieres of the new songs and videos.

 

Friday, February 28, 2020, 7:30-8:30pm, Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center: New Music Series: Contemporary American Art Song with Jennifer Goltz and John Boonenberg, including a premiere of Bloom to Bloom, a song cycle by UIndy Professor Emerita Alice Friman and UIndy Professor of Music John Berners

Soprano Jennifer Goltz is hailed by Gramophone magazine as “captivating” and “brilliant…a voice full of subtle allure and sprightly energy.” Dr. Goltz of the University of Michigan and Dr. Boonenberg of Concordia University, Ann Arbor, appear at UIndy featuring colorful and moving new art songs by American poets and composers, including a premiere of Bloom to Bloom, a song cycle by UIndy Professor Emerita Alice Friman and Professor of Music John Berners. L/P Credit.

 

Saturday, February 29, 2020, 7:30-8:30pm, Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center: UIndy Professor Emerita Alice Friman, Poetry Reading 

Alice Friman reads from her new book, Blood Weather: Poems. Louisiana State University Press, 2019. Alice Friman taught English and creative writing at the University of Indianapolis from 1971 to 1993 and was named Teacher of the Year there in 1993. A highly awarded and celebrated poet, in 2003 Alice moved to Milledgeville, Georgia, to become poet-in-residence in the MFA program at Georgia College & State University. She has also taught at Randolph College, Ball State University, IUPUI, and Curtin University in Perth, Australia. Her new poetry podcast series is Ask Alice.

Hullabaloo 2020 celebrates four years of on-campus letterpress printing

Hullabaloo 2020 logo

Hullabaloo 2020 logo

Reception for invitational exhibit features studio open house, gallery reception, guest artist lecture

The Hullabaloo Press at the University of Indianapolis is celebrating its four-year anniversary with an exhibition of contemporary letterpress printers and bookmakers, January 21 through February 7 at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center Gallery. An opening reception on Monday, January 27 will feature:

  • Print Shop Open House, 3-5 pm. Make your own print and see presses running.
  • Gallery Reception, 4-6 pm. Featuring “New Impressions,” an international juried exhibition, letterpress prints with Indiana connections and UIndy originals
  • Artist Lecture, 6:15 pm with Stephanie Carpenter from the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum, the world’s largest collection of wood type

Printers from around the United States were invited to display a collection of their letterpress work. Exhibitors were selected for their Indiana connections, preservation of historical practices, contemporary innovations, or unique practices we wish to showcase on campus, explained event organizer Katherine Fries, assistant professor in the Department of Art & Design.

Fries said she hopes the exhibit and reception will build awareness about the printmaking studio at the University of Indianapolis and that “letterpress is for everyone.” Any enrolled student can take a letterpress class to satisfy fine arts applied credits, she added.

This free, non-ticketed event is open to the public. Learn more about Hullabaloo 2020.

 

UIndy announces new Logistics Learning Lab

The University of Indianapolis and Vincennes University are announcing a partnership between the University of Indianapolis School of Business, Department of Operations and Supply Chain Management and the Vincennes University Logistics Training & Education Center (VU LTEC). This partnership aims to provide educational training experiences with VU LTEC’s cutting-edge technology and industry-tested equipment through warehousing simulation exercises conducted by VU LTEC staff at VU LTEC’s 30,000 square foot warehouse facility located in Plainfield, Indiana. 

The UIndy Logistics Learning Lab, located inside VU LTEC, will allow University students to participate in lab simulations which have been developed by VU LTEC staff and Dr. Craig Seidelson, assistant professor of operations and supply chain management. Simulations in the Lab will encompass activities like unloadingsoftware assisted fulfillment, and operating packaging automation, transportation management and working with other warehouse equipment. 

Undergraduate students will spend between three and six hours in the Lab per term, with graduate students potentially exceeding that.

The genesis of this partnership occurred in 2017 when Seidelson approached VU LTEC about his students utilizing the VU LTEC space to supplement their classroom learning. “I wanted a place where students could learn about logistics outside of a classroom,” Seidelson says. “The easiest way to teach it is actually in a warehouse.”

UIndy supply chain management students were previously getting their first hands-on experience during their applied business projects, which they conducted completing in actual warehouses for companies around Indianapolis. But Seidelson found that there was too large of a jump from the classroom to the warehouse.

“What I found was the gap between the classroom and the real world was wide when it comes to logistics,” Seidelson says. “And the new UIndy Logistics Learning Lab will bridge that gap.”

“We’re going to put students in lab, put their education into practice, and once they understand things in that lab, that will make them much more capable when doing their applied business projects with actual clients.”

Larry Belcher, dean of the School of Business, added, “The UIndy School of Business curriculum is built around applied learning using industry tools.  This is another way in which we are preparing our students to make a seamless transition into their chosen careers.” 

The Lab makes the UIndy supply chain curriculum unique among schools in Indiana. Seidelson says that there are no other four-year supply chain programs where the university is offering a laboratory for the study of logistics.

Each simulation in the Lab is a competition amongst teams. Students are graded on specific objectives, completion time, pick/pack accuracy and more. In the lab exercises, there is intentionally very little instruction in hopes that the students will learn by doing with a debriefing period at the conclusion of the exercise. 

“The point is to be creative. Learn from your mistakes, through the mistakes of others,” Seidelson says. “The key is putting the education into practice. It’s messy, it’s dirty and things rarely work exactly as expected. We want to prepare the students for real-world experiences.”

About Vincennes University Logistics Training & Education Center

Vincennes University Logistics Training and Education Center (VU LTEC) located in Plainfield, Indiana, has a mission devoted to developing and delivering industry-approved education and training programs that meet the ever-increasing demands of employers in the logistics industry. VU LTEC is dedicated to providing high-quality training through a blended learning environment, encompassing classroom, online and hands-on instruction that will enable VU LTEC students to graduate with certifications, degrees and real-world experience.

About the School of Business

Applied learning is the key to the University of Indianapolis School of Business supply chain management curriculum. From managing “back-office” tasks, to meeting objectives in the warehouse setting, University of Indianapolis School of Business students “learn by doing.” Both undergraduate and graduate courses are taught by dedicated faculty, many of whom bring years of real-world experience to the classroom. Outside the classroom, students gain valuable internship experiences at nearly 100 different businesses each year and are well-prepared to enter the job market or advance in their careers upon graduation.

UIndy engineering students earn top awards at ASEE conference

Screenshot 2019-04-04 22.04.35Twenty engineering students and ten engineering faculty attended the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Illinois-Indiana Section Conference for 2019 hosted by the University of Evansville in March.

From a field that included students from universities from around the region including Purdue University, students from the R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis took home both first- and second-place poster presentation awards. (See a complete list of the winning teams below.)

“It was a great experience to be able to share our project with other engineering professionals and experts,” said Marko Tasic ’21 (industrial and systems engineering).

Students participating in the conference are from the sophomore level ENGR 298 – Engineering Design Lab IV and junior level ENGR 398 – Engineering Design Lab IV, both core classes of the DesignSpine curriculum that emphasizes project-oriented courses with practical, hands-on experience and collaboration on real-world projects.

Joseph B. Herzog is the lead instructor and course coordinator for ENGR 298 and David Olawale is the lead instructor and course coordinator for ENGR 398. Teaching both of these courses is a team effort from all of faculty in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering. Student teams meet with engineering faculty members each week to discuss project status and also consult with faculty outside of class time for technical assistance.

Screenshot 2019-04-04 22.06.19“What I love about this class is that when I walk into the machine shop during the class period, I see a diverse group of students working on multiple different projects. Some students are welding, others are cutting steel, and others are working on the mill. This is a great experience that connects students with external customers, enables students to use their technical engineering skills to design the project, but also give students the opportunities for hands-on work, that will make them better engineers,” Herzog said.

Olawale said the focus during the junior year of the DesignSpine sequence is “entrepreneurial mindset development in our engineering students. Our students are not only developing critical technical skills like engineering design, they are also developing the capacity to identify and exploit needs as opportunities to create value for different stakeholders. Such is the case for our student team that took first position. They are developing a software product that will help universities in assessing the value of the education they are providing.”

List of 2019 ASEE IL-IN Section Award Winners:

Outstanding Poster Awards

1st Place:

“Return on Investment On A University Education: Development of An Analytical Software Tool”

Student Team Members:

  • Joshua Love ’20 (software engineering) 
  • Kristians Kanders ’20 (software engineering) 
  • Kinsey West ’20 (industrial & systems engineering)
  • Ante Lucev ’20 (software engineering) 

2nd Place:

“Design and Fabrication of a Custom Wrist Orthosis for Enhanced Patient Comfort”

Student Team Members:

  • Marko Tasic ’21 (industrial & systems engineering)
  • Matthew Hansen ’21 (mechanical engineering and engineering)
  • Mang Lian ’21 (mechanical engineering)
  • Demetre Mitchell ’21 (mechanical engineering)

South Indy benefits from fruits of UIndy faculty and student labors

The South Indy Quality of Life Plan (SoIndy) is a volunteer organization made up of community residents in eight neighborhoods, including University Heights surrounding the University of Indianapolis, working to bring better quality living to the area. Amie Wojtyna, assistant professor in public health and a University Heights resident, chairs the SoIndy Health and Wellness Action Team, which focuses largely on food insecurity.

“I got involved because I live in this community,” Wojtyna said. “Food insecurity is one of my areas of interest. Most of the SoIndy community is in a food desert.”

Wojtyna’s action team has been integral in bringing to life the community gardens at Bethany Lutheran Church. In addition to providing plots for neighbors to grow their own produce, much of the harvest from the gardens is donated to two local food pantries.

Sean Yeh ’18 (public health education and promotion), worked with SoIndy to help identify what kind of produce patrons of the food pantries were most interested in receiving. Yeh, who was a student of Wojtyna’s, collected input from 139 patrons of Servant’s Heart and Hunger, Inc. food pantries, as well as from Bethany Lutheran’s Learning Ministry. The top three vote-getters in Yeh’s survey were tomatoes, potatoes and strawberries. Participants also asked for cucumbers, onions, peppers, carrots, raspberries, greens, squash, eggplant and chiles.

Related: Free gardening classes begin March 12, 2019, at Bethany Community Garden

“This experience was really eye-opening for me,” Yeh said. “I was able to gain ‘real-life’ experience. Although I learned a lot in class, textbooks don’t teach you about the possible mistakes you could make or how to prepare for obstacles. There were many mistakes I made in this process and things I could have done better, but ultimately, I learned from them.”

Yeh points to some data collection difficulties that prevented the reporting of demographic information.

“Experiencing failure, especially when you are working for a good and real cause, really provides insight and experience that I will never forget,” Yeh said. “It will allow me to prepare and perform at a higher level the next time I do something like this.”

Other SoIndy action teams include Community Building, Connectivity, Education and Workforce Development, Housing, Madison Avenue Corridor, and Shelby Street Corridor.  

Both Wojtyna and Yeh encourage others to get involved in the SoIndy efforts. Several of Wojtyna’s students – both undergrad and graduate – have done projects with the organization, ranging from a one-time afternoon to a semester-long commitment.

“All in all, SoIndy is there to make Indianapolis a better place,” Yeh said. “There’s nothing more rewarding than knowing you helped make a positive change and actually witness it.”

Written by Amy Magan, communications manager for the Center for Aging & Community and the College of Health Sciences.

Sport Management grad student scores job with Pacers

JSpringer2019 is already an exciting year for Jacob Springer, Master of Sport Management student in the Department of Kinesiology, Health, and Sport Sciences. Not only will he graduate with his classmates this summer, he is starting the new year with a new title: Consumer Sales Executive at the Indiana Pacers.

“I will be working as a sales rep for the Pacers, helping to sell season ticket packages and servicing clients who attend games,” said Springer.

Springer has been preparing for this job since he first stepped on campus. After graduating from Indiana University with a major in Sports Marketing and Management and minors in business, law, and marketing, he contemplated his options and chose to enroll in UIndy’s sport management master’s program “because it was flexible, allowing me to work full-time as an intern and now as a full-time employee,” Springer said. “UIndy is near a lot of different sports organizations and allowed me to look for opportunities here in town while I was in grad school.”

Not only is Indianapolis a great location for the sports industry, UIndy offered Springer the chance to work with Dr. Jennifer VanSickle, director of the undergraduate and graduate sport management programs, as a graduate assistant.

“Working with Dr. VanSickle has given me opportunities to branch out and connect with and meet new people that have grown my network.”

In fact, Springer’s network has expanded to the Indy Sports Business Conference, an event the UIndy sport management program will host at Banker’s Life Fieldhouse on April 1. “I have been working closely with (VanSickle) to secure panelists for the event, reach out to potential students and attendees, as well as help secure the event venue and setup,” said Springer.

Springer attributes his professional growth and success to the great support he has received from the MSSM program. The best part? “The flexibility and the people I have gotten to network with so far.”

UIndy would like to wish Springer – and the Indiana Pacers — the best of luck.

-Written by Olivia Horvath ’20 (doctorate of occupational therapy)

Two students earn top honors in University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra Concerto Competition

The University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra Concerto Competition held Jan. 29, 2019, recognized the wide-ranging talent of students in the Department of Music and honored a winner and runner-up.

Lucy Shirley

Lucy Shirley

Lucy Shirley ’20, a piano performance major with a music composition concentration, won the competition for her rendition of the Rondo all´Ungherese from Franz Joseph Haydn’s Piano Concerto D Major, Hob. XVIII:11. Gavin Craig ’20 (music therapy) was chosen as runner-up for his performance of Pierre Max Dubois’ Concerto for Alto Saxophone and Orchestra.

Ten students participated in the competition, with faculty Greg Martin, assistant professor, Haruka Ostojic, assistant professor, and Brandon Vos ’18 (music performance) as accompanists. Faculty judges were Rebecca Sorley, professor, Jennifer Howlett, adjunct, and conductor Ariel Rudiakov, adjunct.

Shirley, who is also a Franco-Germanic Studies minor with an Honors concentration, called the chance to participate in the Concerto Competition a “wonderful gift.”

“When participating in any competition, of course, you hope to win, but the UIndy music department is so full of talented musicians that I truly wasn’t expecting to. It was such a nice surprise!” said Shirley, who plans to participate in the Charles Joray Piano Competition in March.

Shirley, a graduate of Irvington Preparatory Academy in Indianapolis, credits her teacher and mentor, Sharon Parr, associate professor, in guiding her instruction, among numerous faculty mentors.

“I’ve grown so much in technique, musicality and artistic centeredness by studying piano with her. I absolutely could not have won the competition without her tutelage and encouraging support!” said Shirley.

I am so delighted Lucy was able to share her love of this music and reap the reward of being named winner on top of it. Something that is special about Lucy is the way she conveys her joy in music and life when she sits at the keyboard. It makes the experience that much more engaging and meaningful for those who listen,” Parr said.

Shirley will perform Haydn’s Piano Concerto no.11 in D major with the University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Ariel Rudiakov, at 4 p.m., April 7, 2019, at the Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center.

Gavin Craig

Gavin Craig

Gavin Craig, a Winchester Community High School graduate, said he loves the opportunity to step into the competition and be weighed against his peers.

“I competed in the competition last year where I was both the youngest, and the only woodwind! It doesn’t get any less daunting, though, because everyone is always bringing the best that they have to offer to the competition,” he said.

“I’m extremely proud and impressed by Gavin’s work ethic and overall musicianship. The greatest benefit of any music competition is the growth a given student achieves through preparation,” said Scotty Stepp, Craig’s instructor.

Learn more about the University of Indianapolis Department of Music.

 

15 UIndy students earn scholarships to impact public health

In addition to providing scholarships, the Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) also provides hands-on healthcare activities to students.

In addition to providing scholarships, the Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) also provides hands-on healthcare activities to students.

Four University of Indianapolis undergraduate students and 10 graduate students have a lighter financial load this semester, thanks to scholarships provided by the Indianapolis Health Careers Opportunities Program (HCOP). The program is run by the Metropolitan Indianapolis Central Indiana Area Health Education Center (MICI-AHEC), which is hosted by UIndy.

Undergraduate recipients each received $2,500. Eight graduate students received $7,500, while two received partial scholarships of $2,500. The scholarship recipients are:

Undergraduate – Jaylan Steele, Terria Beckett, Emma Zabor, and Sara Panczyk

Graduate –Alyssha Cloud, Mackenzie Sauer, Alexandria Goddard, Morgan Benjamin, Moriam Olorunoje, Sydney Elliott, Jasmine Everfield, Mikia Davis, Gracyn Burns, and Celine Siahmakoun.

“I am a public health major because public health careers are some of the most overlooked careers we have, and we need more public health workers. We need more people to help raise awareness of human trafficking, tobacco, and other drug addictions and more. Public health is how we can help solve these issues,” said Beckett.

To be eligible, students must attend an accredited college or university in Marion or the eight surrounding counties and must be currently enrolled in a health or allied health program pursuing a career in a health profession such as social work, occupational or physical therapy, clinical psychology or counseling, public health, or athletic training, among others. Pre-med and nursing students are not eligible. In addition, they must be from an economically or educationally disadvantaged background and have a desire to work in a medically underserved area.

The application process included several short essay questions, such as why they want to work in areas without good access to healthcare.

All communities deserve the right and ability to get medical resources, including underserved areas,” Goddard said. “As a social worker, it’s important to know the ways to help in underserved communities such as gathering resources, appropriate homes, food medications, and counseling services. There is a need for resources to help parents understand their rights and the paperwork that they are given. I hope to be the person to help students get to their destiny throughout my journey and career.”

Another round of HCOP INDY scholarships will open in February. Information about the scholarships will be posted on the MICI-AHEC website February 1, 2019.

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