University of Indianapolis Department of Theatre announces regional world premiere of “Kill Move Paradise”

The University of Indianapolis announced a live-stream theatre production of James Ijames’ groundbreaking work, “Kill Move Paradise” at 8:00 p.m., February 26-28 and March 4-6, 2021. Produced in collaboration with the University of Indianapolis Black Student Association and the Office of Inclusion & Equity, this regional world premiere of “Kill Move Paradise” is guest directed by Indianapolis-based multidisciplinary artist Ben Rose. The live-stream is open to the general public and pre-registration is required.

"Kill Move Paradise" rehearsal

“Kill Move Paradise” rehearsal

“Kill Move Paradise” follows four young Black people who find themselves stuck in a purgatory-like waiting room for the afterlife. Isa (Joshua Short), Daz (Robert Gurley ’24, theatre and psychology major), Grif (Kelli Thomas ’23, theatre major) and Tiny (Sarah Cunningham ’24, pre-nursing) are forced to confront the reality of their past and how they arrived in this unearthly place. Inspired by the ever-growing list of slain Black men and women, “Kill Move Paradise” illustrates the potential for collective transformation and radical acts of joy. The play also uses humor to highlight the natural dynamics among the group. 

“That’s what I love about James Ijames,” director Ben Rose said. “He’s made this subtle piece in an abstract environment where you’re learning and resonating and laughing, but you’re also feeling the weight of it.”

The play, which was recognized as a New York Times Critic’s Pick when it debuted in 2017, was adapted for the University of Indianapolis performance. Originally written for four male protagonists, playwright James Ijames granted permission to make one of the characters female, which allowed for the expansion of gender diversity among the cast. Another female actor plays the role of a young boy. 

“The playwright has allowed us a lot of latitude,” said Rose. “It’s been easy to transform this play in the way we needed to.”

Rose cleverly combines pandemic restrictions with the play’s exploration of yearning for connection by creating a set of plexiglass cubicles on the stage, allowing the actors to interact while maintaining physical distance and resulting in an apropos setting for a timely discussion.

“The idea that we can create this space where we are talking about Black martyrdom and there’s this play that’s been written about it and we can broadcast out through our mass media—it all clicked together,” Rose said.

Dr. Grant Williams, associate adjunct professor of theatre, suggested the play after witnessing the Black Lives Matter protests around the country in 2020. “In light of the brutality, injustices and protests sweeping the country last year, we felt, as a department, that we wanted to contribute to that discussion and allow our theatre to add a voice of both protest and discussion,” Williams said.

The UIndy Department of Theatre collaborated with the Office of Inclusion & Equity to drive awareness and involvement in the production among students of color, an effort that Williams said is just the start. 

“Beginning with ‘Kill Move Paradise,’ as well as a continuing collaboration with both the Black Student Association and the Office of Inclusion & Equity, our department looks to produce more works in the coming years that give voice to Black students and promote more diverse theatrical work,” he added.

“Working in partnership with the Department of Theatre and through the programs established on campus by the Office of Inclusion & Equity, our goal is to encourage more students of color to explore the performing arts and to create more organic relationships between faculty and students of color,” said Dr. Amber Smith, Vice President & Chief Inclusion and Equity Officer. 

For University of Indianapolis students, “Kill Move Paradise” provides the opportunity to connect with an established professional artist while exploring powerful contemporary themes that resonate with their lives. Senaite Tekle ’21 (theatre), stage manager, noted the play’s parallels with Black Lives Matter goals.

“The idea of the Black Lives Matter movement brings light to the unlawful, racially motivated violence against Black people. ‘Kill Move Paradise’ sheds light on the slain Black men and women who were taken from their loved ones,” said Tekle. “This play also forces the audience to listen and take in the importance of how Black people have been treated throughout history in this country.”

Kelli Thomas '23

Kelli Thomas ’23

“This is my first show that is centered around the Black experience and involved an all-Black cast. It’s really beautiful seeing people like me being so highly represented in the art that I love,” said Kelli Thomas ’23 (theatre and sociology), who plays the role of Grif.

NOTE: Six virtual performances will be offered Feb. 26-28 and March 4-6, 2021. The March 4th performance will be followed by a discussion of the topics explored in the play. Pre-registration is required and virtual seats are limited.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

University of Indianapolis Music Department announces technology upgrades to broadcast equipment and multi-disciplinary learning opportunities for students

The University of Indianapolis Department of Music announced today extensive upgrades to video and broadcast production equipment, allowing for multi-disciplinary learning for music students as well as improving the concert-going experience, in the age of COVID and beyond.

UIndy music students get hands-on experience with the new technology.

UIndy music students get hands-on experience with the new technology.

“This expansion offers an incredible opportunity for our music technology students to both work on the audio side of live video broadcast productions and on the video side itself, on equipment found in many concert halls, churches, and venues,” said Brett Leonard, assistant professor and director of the Music Technology program at the University. “This cross-training puts our students in a great position to enter a variety of roles within our increasingly multi-medium industry.”

Upgrades to the production system at the University of Indianapolis, which hosts dozens of concerts, lectures and events every year, include:

Panasonic 4K cameras
Switching and recording equipment from Blackmagic Designs
Remote-operated PTZ (pan, tilt, zoom) cameras

Live streaming technology at the UIndy Department of MusicThe upgrades will work together to allow for 4K streaming to multiple websites and viewing platforms, which is especially important while audience attendance is limited or prohibited due to COVID restrictions. The new system will also allow for simultaneous multi-camera recording for large-scale recording projects like the annual Christmas from Campus concert.

Not only focused on the livestream experience, the upgrades will provide real-time feeds of multi-camera content to the lobby for patrons waiting to be seated—and offers the opportunity to provide an overflow area for oversold events.

Livestreamed concerts have a viewership that approaches that of typical concert attendance, according to Leonard, so it is important for the University to maintain high broadcast quality. Now, these entirely student-run 4K multi-camera broadcasts—complete with multi-track audio and isolated camera recordings—will provide concert streamers a performance experience as close to being “in the house” as possible. For students and performers with friends and family all across the country this is an important step for helping the Department of Music adapt to new COVID norms.

“The pandemic pushed us all into new roles within the industry,” Leonard added. “Giving our students more opportunities to learn new skills will leave them better prepared for entering an industry that has seen rapid change during the pandemic.”

About the University of Indianapolis Department of Music
Music students at the University of Indianapolis have the chance to engage with first-rate faculty, experience performances in a world-class concert venue, and connect in a close-knit educational environment, all within minutes of downtown Indianapolis. The music technology program provides hands-on experience within the recording and broadcast facilities in the Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, an exquisite, Viennese-style concert hall, as well as dedicated recording facilities in the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center to engage in learning across a wide variety of specialties within the field of music technology. Close proximity to the downtown area and the Fountain Square district provides a vibrant setting for internship possibilities as well as culturally engaging opportunities for Indianapolis residents and University students alike.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

University of Indianapolis announces Dean’s List, Honor Roll for Fall 2020 semester

Dean's List and Honor Roll graphicThe University of Indianapolis has published a list of students who made the Dean’s List or Honor Roll for the Fall 2020 semester.

The online database can be found here: http://news.uindy.edu/honors.

The database includes a listing of the student’s name along with hometown and honors earned. The list can also be sorted by zip code to generate results representing your community.

Students named to the Dean’s List have completed at least 12 hours during a semester and earned a grade point average of 3.7 or higher. Honor Roll students have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours and earned a grade point average of at least 3.4 but less than 3.7. Semester Honor Rolls and Dean’s List encourage scholarship of high quality and give appropriate public acknowledgment to students whose work deserves recognition.


About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

University of Indianapolis Etchings Press announces 2020 Whirling Prize recipients

Etchings Press, the University of Indianapolis student-run publisher, has announced the recipients of the 2020 Whirling Prize.

The Whirling Prize welcomes submissions of published books related to specific themes that change annually. The 2020 prize focused on the theme of horror.

Laurel Radzieski

Laurel Radzieski

Laurel Radzieski was awarded the 2020 Whirling Prize in Poetry for her collection “Red Mother” (NYQ Books).

Joseph P. Laycock was awarded the 2020 Whirling Prize in Prose

Joseph Laycock (photo: Dan Addison)

Joseph Laycock (photo: Dan Addison)

for his book, The Penguin Book of Exorcisms” (Penguin Classics).

Author and cover photos available for download here.

Student judges would like to honor the following finalists in the 2020 contest:

  • “Enantiodromia” by Mike X Welch
  • “Lake County Incidents” by Alec Cizak
  • “Homesick” by Nino Cipri

Students enrolled in ENGL 479 reviewed submissions and selected winners in the categories of prose and poetry.

“The student judges explored and engaged with Horror this fall and ended the competition with a greater appreciation of the nuances of the genre, after having the opportunity to read the contest entries. It was an excellent learning experience,” said Liz Whiteacre, advisor of the 2020 Whirling Prize.

The winners will receive a $500 honorarium and broadsides celebrating their book designed by a Hullabaloo Press artist. They will each join student judges in conversation on episodes of the UIndy Potluck Podcast. For updates, follow @uindyetchings on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

About “Red Mother”
In “Red Mother,” Laurel Radzieski weaves a love story told from the perspective of a parasite. This series of short poems explores the intimacy, desire and devotion we all experience by following the sometimes tender, often distressing relationship that emerges between a parasite and its host. Radzieski’s poetry is playful, though often with sinister undertones. Far from romanticizing either role, “Red Mother” takes readers on a tour of their own innards, exposing the hooks and claws of all involved. Following the parasite’s life cycle, the book blurs the line between science and poetic license to create a fantastical romp not for the squeamish. Although parasites are not known as conversationalists, Radzieski’s guest has a lot to say.

About The Penguin Book of Exorcisms”
Believe it or not, fifty-seven percent of Americans believe in demonic possession. Spirit possession has been documented for thousands of years and across religions and cultures, even into our time. “The Penguin Book of Exorcisms,” edited by religious studies scholar Joseph P. Laycock, showcases a range of stories, beliefs and practices surrounding exorcism from across time, cultures and religions. Laycock’s exhaustive research incorporates scientific papers, letters and diary entries by the clergy, treatises by physicians and theologians, reports from missionaries and colonial officers, legal proceedings, and poetry and popular legends. The result is informative and entertaining, and proves that truth can indeed be scarier than fiction.

Call for 2021 entries
Student judges welcome recently published books of prose and poetry in response to the theme of nature published since January 2019. Students are employing a broad interpretation of these criteria in their reading and judging. The deadline for submissions is September 3, 2021. Details may be found on the Etchings website.

University of Indianapolis and Ivy Tech Community College Announce Transfer Agreements for four degree Programs

The University of Indianapolis and Ivy Tech Community College announced today a series of transfer agreements establishing a seamless transition for qualifying students between programs at Ivy Tech Community College and the University of Indianapolis. The transfer agreements include the following programs:

  • Ivy Tech Community College’s Associate of Science in Chemistry and the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree program at the University of Indianapolis
  • Ivy Tech Community College’s Associate of Science in Psychology and the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree program at the University of Indianapolis
  • Ivy Tech Community College’s Associate of Science in Business and the University of Indianapolis School of Business, Bachelor of Arts or Science degree programs in: Accounting, Business Administration & Management, Finance, Entrepreneurship, Information Systems & Applied Business Analytics, Marketing, Sports Marketing, and Operations & Supply Chain Management
  • Ivy Tech Community College’s Associate of Science in Human Services and the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences, Bachelor of Social Work degree program at the University of Indianapolis

The partnership will provide a basis for a cooperative relationship between the University of Indianapolis and Ivy Tech Community College to benefit students who desire to complete a bachelor’s degree in a variety of programs. This agreement will allow Ivy Tech students completing an associate degree program to move seamlessly to earning their bachelor’s degree at the University of Indianapolis by being admitted to the University with a junior standing, provided they meet other admissions criteria.

“The University of Indianapolis is excited to offer this opportunity and expand the number of students in our community who are able to attain bachelor’s degrees,” said Robert L. Manuel, president of the University of Indianapolis. “The partnership expands access to our high-quality degree programs to anyone who is ready and interested, and will assist individual students, regional economic development initiatives, and our society as a whole.”

Ivy Tech Community College provides students with a sound, comprehensive introduction to these fields and will prepare them for taking the next step to earning a bachelor’s degree.

“Ivy Tech is delighted to add these new seamless transfer opportunities with the University of Indianapolis,” said Sue Ellspermann, Ivy Tech President. “The opportunity to complete the first two years of a Bachelor’s degree at Ivy Tech and transfer all of that credit to University of Indianapolis will significantly reduce the total cost of degree completion and provide even more excellent transfer options for students who wish to complete their degree while staying within the Indianapolis metropolitan area.” 

According to the agreements, Ivy Tech graduates from the aforementioned associate degree programs may transfer to the University of Indianapolis and apply a minimum of 60 credit hours from that completed degree to the requirements for a corresponding bachelor of science or art degree in the Shaheen College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences, or the School of Business. 

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College is Indiana’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system, accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana and also serves thousands of students annually online. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering associate degree and short-term certificate programs, and trainings that align to the needs of the community. The College also offers courses and associate degree programs that seamlessly transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana, as well as out of state, for a more affordable route to a Bachelor’s degree.

University of Indianapolis partners with the Financial Planning Association to present virtual Financial Planning Day Jan. 30th

INDIANAPOLIS—The University of Indianapolis’ School of Business and the Financial Planning Association will partner to present Financial Planning Day on January 30, 2021, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The event is open to members of the community for free financial planning services from certified financial advisors. Interview opportunities are available both virtually and in person with the University of Indianapolis’ Student Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) President Emily Muckerheide and Pro Bono Co-Director of FPA Chad Reed.

Financial Planning Day, hosted by the University of Indianapolis’ School of Business in partnership with the Financial Planning Association, helps bring the knowledge and expertise of certified financial planners (CFPs) to the Indianapolis community. Receive FREE advice, via Zoom, from Indy’s best CFPs to assist in an array of financial situations. Among the offered services include: credit/debt management, estate planning, government benefits, and personal budgeting. The Financial Planning Association is eager to help members of the community during these unprecedented times and UIndy is proud to live out its “Education for Service” motto through this event.

Learn more and register here.

The Financial Planning Association® (FPA®) is the primary membership organization for financial planning practitioners who want to master the practice of financial planning, and who are committed to shaping the future of the profession.

Applied Learning is the key to the UIndy School of Business. From managing a portfolio of real money in the UIndy Student Fund to working directly with clients on project management, UIndy students “learn by doing.” Both undergraduate and graduate courses are taught by dedicated faculty, many of whom have many years of real-world experience they bring to the classroom. In addition to the classroom, students gain valuable internship experiences at nearly 100 different businesses each year and are well-prepared to enter the job market or advance in their careers upon graduation.

Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning announces final cohort of Rural Early College Network schools

Five Indiana high schools will join the Rural Early College Network (RECN) to help students earn college credit while they complete their high school education. Each school will receive $120,000 over three years as they work with the University of Indianapolis Center for Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL) and a mentor high school. 

CELL established the Rural Early College Network through a $7.9 million grant from the federal Education Innovation and Research program administered by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Elementary and Secondary Education. RECN helps rural Indiana schools more quickly implement the Early College high school model. Early College targets underserved students and allows them to earn both high school diplomas and up to two years of credits toward bachelor’s or associate degrees through rigorous dual credit classes supported by wrap-around services.

A total of 20 schools will be participating in RECN, with these five schools being the final group to join the project:

Frontier Jr-Sr High School
Seeger Memorial Jr-Sr High School
Shoals Community High School
Southridge High School
Sheridan High School

“We are excited to welcome these high schools to the Rural Early College Network (RECN) project. Funding and support provided to these schools will help to develop Early College programming for underserved students, allowing them to earn a high school diploma with up to two years of college credits. Our team is excited to work with the educators at these five schools to support innovative opportunities for Hoosier students,” said Carey Dahncke, CELL executive director.

Recipient schools may use the funds for teacher credentialing for dual credit instruction, professional development, travel to RECN meetings and conferences, and other items that each school specifically needs to support the students and staff.  Schools also receive professional development on work-based learning and career readiness activities for students.  

About CELL
Created in 2001, the Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL) at the University of Indianapolis has served as the leading convener, catalyst and collaborator for innovative education change. CELL’s mission is for all people in Indiana to experience meaningful and high-quality education. CELL partners with schools and communities to improve outcomes for students of all ages by leading sustainable educational innovation and transformation across Indiana. Providing leadership that is both cutting-edge and action-oriented, CELL unites districts, schools, communities, universities and businesses to build a sense of urgency and form innovative collaborations for statewide educational and economic improvement. Learn more: cell.uindy.edu.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

University of Indianapolis hosts virtual 44th Annual Lugar Symposium

NPR’s Steve Inskeep to host annual symposium for high school juniors

INDIANAPOLIS—The 44th annual Richard G. Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow’s Leaders featuring NPR’s Steve Inskeep, hosted by The Richard G. Lugar Academy at the University of Indianapolis, will move to a virtual format to bring together hundreds of top high school juniors from Indiana for a day of discussion on public issues and world events on Saturday, December 5. 

Richard G. Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow's Leaders featuring NPR's Steve Inskeep on Saturday, December 7, 2019. (Photo by D. Todd Moore/ University of Indianapolis)

Richard G. Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow’s Leaders featuring NPR’s Steve Inskeep on Saturday, December 7, 2019. (Photo by D. Todd Moore/ University of Indianapolis)

Journalist, author and host of National Public Radio’s Morning Edition Steve Inskeep will be the keynote speaker. Inskeep will discuss the concept of public service and how students can serve the greater good, both now and in their future careers.

Part of the expansive legacy former Indiana Senator Richard G. Lugar created in his lifetime, more than 20,000 students have benefited from the symposium in over four decades. The Lugar Academy is committed to maintaining Sen. Lugar’s legacy by continuing with his signature event.

Students will select from a variety of breakout sessions on current topical issues, including the 2020 presidential election, systemic racism, crisis leadership and the role of the United States in international relations. In keeping with Senator Lugar’s tradition of evaluating issues based on merit, the Symposium ensures students are presented with a balanced view of the issues, rather than a partisan viewpoint.

The Lugar Symposium will start at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, December 5, 2020. Members of the public are encouraged to join the virtual keynote by registering via this link.

About the Lugar Academy
More than 20,000 promising students have participated in the Lugar Symposium during the past four decades, gaining wisdom, insight and access to some of the finest minds available. Principals from every high school in Indiana are asked to select three outstanding student leaders from their junior class to attend the Symposium. Sen. Richard G. Lugar (April 4, 1932 – April 28, 2019) served as a Distinguished Trustee, a former professor of political science and received an honorary degree from the University of Indianapolis, among 46 colleges and universities which bestowed Lugar with the honor during his lifetime. Lugar was a fifth-generation Hoosier who left the United States Senate as the longest-serving member of Congress in Indiana history. The symposium that bears his name was launched in 1977 as an opportunity to discuss with students topics of local and global importance.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

University of Indianapolis history faculty Edward O. Frantz collaborates with Indiana political mainstay John Mutz on new autobiography

“An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story,”

“An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story”

“An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story” from IHS Press chronicles life of former Indiana lieutenant governor

 

INDIANAPOLIS—A collaboration between Edward O. Frantz, professor and department chair of history at the University of Indianapolis, and longtime Indiana politician John Mutz, explores the role of Mutz’s career in shaping what the city of Indianapolis looks like today.

“An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story,” published by the Indiana Historical Society (IHS) Press, provides a comprehensive overview of Mutz’s expertise in politics, philanthropy and business. Mutz helped establish Indianapolis’ reputation as a sports business hub and was the person most responsible for bringing the Subaru plant to Lafayette, Ind., a move that reinvigorated manufacturing throughout the Hoosier state.

“John Mutz is one of the people who helped to dramatically transform Indianapolis,” Frantz said. “His character, emotional intelligence, and leadership have helped to inspire scores of Hoosiers; I am so happy to play a part in helping to tell his story.”

Photo of Prof. Frantz available here.

Mutz, who served Indiana in the General Assembly (1967-1971), State Senate (1972-1980) and as lieutenant governor of Indiana (1981-1989), is one of only two surviving architects of Unigov. He authored the bill that rewrote Indiana’s school funding formula and co-sponsored the bill that created White River State Park. His philanthropic achievements include establishing the Lumina Foundation, where he served as board chair (2002-2010), and serving as president of the Lilly Endowment (1989-1993), where he oversaw the major initiative Giving Indiana Funds for Tomorrow, resulting in $2 billion committed across the state.

In this book, Mutz collaborates with American historian Frantz, author of “The Door of Hope: Republican Presidents and the First Southern Strategy, 1877–1933,” and editor of “A Companion to the Reconstruction Presidents.” Working together, Mutz and Frantz have combined the perspective and experience of an accomplished leader with the insight of a political historian. Mutz’s gratitude about the life he has led is the motivating force behind “An Examined Life.” This book represents a culminating contribution to Indiana’s civic life by imparting the life experiences of a man who uniquely merged politics, business and philanthropy.

Edward O. Frantz, professor of history

Edward O. Frantz, professor of history

“John often talks about many of the events of his life being a series of happy accidents,” Frantz said. “This project was the happiest of accidents I could have ever hoped for. Given John’s experience in politics, philanthropy and corporate governance, this book is unique in that it is both a memoir and a look at some of the most consequential changes in modern Indianapolis. John’s life has provided me with a lifetime’s worth of lessons.”

“An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story” is available through IHS’s Basile History Market and other places books are sold.

About the Authors

John M. Mutz served as lieutenant governor of Indiana from 1981 to 1989. A recognized leader in politics, philanthropy and business, Mutz is the author of “Fundraising for Dummies.” Edward O. Frantz is an American historian and author of “The Door of Hope: Republican Presidents and the First Southern Strategy, 1877–1933,” and editor of “A Companion to the Reconstruction Presidents.”

**********************************

Title: An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story

Publisher: Indiana Historical Society Press

Pages: 223

Size: 6 x 9

Cover: Hardcover

Publication Date: September 2020

Cost: $24.95

ISBN: 978-0-87195-444-2

University of Indianapolis receives $100,000 grant from Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation to expand Art & Design facilities

A $100,000 grant from the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation will expand opportunities for University of Indianapolis students, faculty, staff and art lovers throughout the Midwest to connect with the fine arts. The grant will support a significant facility upgrade and expansion that meets the Department of Art & Design’s growing needs to accommodate more students and to continue to meet the accrediting standards set by the National Association for Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). 

Through the expansion, the Department’s space will increase by 73 percent from 15,000 square feet to 26,000. The project includes the renovation of an existing building on campus and a reorganization of space within the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center. The additional, repurposed building will include spaces for a sculpture studio (both wood and metal), ceramics, art therapy space, a new student gallery, studio classroom, two offices and storage space. Reorganization and updating of the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center will allow expansion of the printmaking studio, digital photography studio, animation/illustration digital studio and a studio classroom. 

“This initiative plays a critical role in helping the University of Indianapolis expand our facilities to accommodate the increasing enrollments in our Art & Design programs,” said President Robert L. Manuel. “We are grateful to the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation for their support of this project, which allows the University to grow its impact and build innovative connections between students, faculty, staff and the community.”

The University of Indianapolis Art & Design program is one of only 300+ schools in the nation to be accredited by the National Association for Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). The expansion will fulfill the Department of Art & Design’s growing program demands and continued accreditation requirements of the NASAD.

With programs in studio art, visual communication design, pre-art therapy and art education, the University of Indianapolis Department of Art & Design also offers concentrations in drawing, painting, ceramics, digital photography, printmaking, sculpture and animation/illustration. The expansion will provide the additional space required to facilitate the department’s expanding programs and to grow the department’s interdisciplinary collaborations both inside and outside of the University. During the last five years, innovative programs have connected students with regional and national networks of artists and community organizations. Faculty-led projects such as the “River Fish” sculpture along the White River and a hanging sculpture for the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra’s 2020 Beethoven Series have created hands-on learning experiences for students while further reinforcing the department’s reputation for artistic excellence.

“Students have shared that they choose UIndy’s Art & Design program due to its outstanding reputation for quality and supportive faculty. This expansion shows prospective and current students that the University highly values our Art & Design program and our students. This project also demonstrates the priority the University gives to providing access to art and cultural events on the southside of Indianapolis and growing our role as a vital community anchor,” said Mary Moore, interim dean of the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences.

About the University of Indianapolis Department of Art & Design
The University of Indianapolis Art & Design program is the largest Art & Design program at a private university in central Indiana. It is one of only 300+ schools in the nation to be accredited by the National Association for Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). The department, which will celebrate its centennial anniversary in 2023, has been educating students with the vision to teach them proficiency in the fundamentals of art, improve their understanding of artistic heritage and culture, enhance their critical thinking abilities, endow them with artistic skills, stimulate their imaginations and improve their knowledge base to further enhance the art community in Indiana and beyond. 

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

 

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