University of Indianapolis announces Dean’s List, Honor Roll for Fall 2020 semester

Dean's List and Honor Roll graphicThe University of Indianapolis has published a list of students who made the Dean’s List or Honor Roll for the Fall 2020 semester.

The online database can be found here: http://news.uindy.edu/honors.

The database includes a listing of the student’s name along with hometown and honors earned. The list can also be sorted by zip code to generate results representing your community.

Students named to the Dean’s List have completed at least 12 hours during a semester and earned a grade point average of 3.7 or higher. Honor Roll students have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours and earned a grade point average of at least 3.4 but less than 3.7. Semester Honor Rolls and Dean’s List encourage scholarship of high quality and give appropriate public acknowledgment to students whose work deserves recognition.


About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

University of Indianapolis Etchings Press announces 2020 Whirling Prize recipients

Etchings Press, the University of Indianapolis student-run publisher, has announced the recipients of the 2020 Whirling Prize.

The Whirling Prize welcomes submissions of published books related to specific themes that change annually. The 2020 prize focused on the theme of horror.

Laurel Radzieski

Laurel Radzieski

Laurel Radzieski was awarded the 2020 Whirling Prize in Poetry for her collection “Red Mother” (NYQ Books).

Joseph P. Laycock was awarded the 2020 Whirling Prize in Prose

Joseph Laycock (photo: Dan Addison)

Joseph Laycock (photo: Dan Addison)

for his book, The Penguin Book of Exorcisms” (Penguin Classics).

Author and cover photos available for download here.

Student judges would like to honor the following finalists in the 2020 contest:

  • “Enantiodromia” by Mike X Welch
  • “Lake County Incidents” by Alec Cizak
  • “Homesick” by Nino Cipri

Students enrolled in ENGL 479 reviewed submissions and selected winners in the categories of prose and poetry.

“The student judges explored and engaged with Horror this fall and ended the competition with a greater appreciation of the nuances of the genre, after having the opportunity to read the contest entries. It was an excellent learning experience,” said Liz Whiteacre, advisor of the 2020 Whirling Prize.

The winners will receive a $500 honorarium and broadsides celebrating their book designed by a Hullabaloo Press artist. They will each join student judges in conversation on episodes of the UIndy Potluck Podcast. For updates, follow @uindyetchings on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

About “Red Mother”
In “Red Mother,” Laurel Radzieski weaves a love story told from the perspective of a parasite. This series of short poems explores the intimacy, desire and devotion we all experience by following the sometimes tender, often distressing relationship that emerges between a parasite and its host. Radzieski’s poetry is playful, though often with sinister undertones. Far from romanticizing either role, “Red Mother” takes readers on a tour of their own innards, exposing the hooks and claws of all involved. Following the parasite’s life cycle, the book blurs the line between science and poetic license to create a fantastical romp not for the squeamish. Although parasites are not known as conversationalists, Radzieski’s guest has a lot to say.

About The Penguin Book of Exorcisms”
Believe it or not, fifty-seven percent of Americans believe in demonic possession. Spirit possession has been documented for thousands of years and across religions and cultures, even into our time. “The Penguin Book of Exorcisms,” edited by religious studies scholar Joseph P. Laycock, showcases a range of stories, beliefs and practices surrounding exorcism from across time, cultures and religions. Laycock’s exhaustive research incorporates scientific papers, letters and diary entries by the clergy, treatises by physicians and theologians, reports from missionaries and colonial officers, legal proceedings, and poetry and popular legends. The result is informative and entertaining, and proves that truth can indeed be scarier than fiction.

Call for 2021 entries
Student judges welcome recently published books of prose and poetry in response to the theme of nature published since January 2019. Students are employing a broad interpretation of these criteria in their reading and judging. The deadline for submissions is September 3, 2021. Details may be found on the Etchings website.

University of Indianapolis and Ivy Tech Community College Announce Transfer Agreements for four degree Programs

The University of Indianapolis and Ivy Tech Community College announced today a series of transfer agreements establishing a seamless transition for qualifying students between programs at Ivy Tech Community College and the University of Indianapolis. The transfer agreements include the following programs:

  • Ivy Tech Community College’s Associate of Science in Chemistry and the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree program at the University of Indianapolis
  • Ivy Tech Community College’s Associate of Science in Psychology and the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree program at the University of Indianapolis
  • Ivy Tech Community College’s Associate of Science in Business and the University of Indianapolis School of Business, Bachelor of Arts or Science degree programs in: Accounting, Business Administration & Management, Finance, Entrepreneurship, Information Systems & Applied Business Analytics, Marketing, Sports Marketing, and Operations & Supply Chain Management
  • Ivy Tech Community College’s Associate of Science in Human Services and the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences, Bachelor of Social Work degree program at the University of Indianapolis

The partnership will provide a basis for a cooperative relationship between the University of Indianapolis and Ivy Tech Community College to benefit students who desire to complete a bachelor’s degree in a variety of programs. This agreement will allow Ivy Tech students completing an associate degree program to move seamlessly to earning their bachelor’s degree at the University of Indianapolis by being admitted to the University with a junior standing, provided they meet other admissions criteria.

“The University of Indianapolis is excited to offer this opportunity and expand the number of students in our community who are able to attain bachelor’s degrees,” said Robert L. Manuel, president of the University of Indianapolis. “The partnership expands access to our high-quality degree programs to anyone who is ready and interested, and will assist individual students, regional economic development initiatives, and our society as a whole.”

Ivy Tech Community College provides students with a sound, comprehensive introduction to these fields and will prepare them for taking the next step to earning a bachelor’s degree.

“Ivy Tech is delighted to add these new seamless transfer opportunities with the University of Indianapolis,” said Sue Ellspermann, Ivy Tech President. “The opportunity to complete the first two years of a Bachelor’s degree at Ivy Tech and transfer all of that credit to University of Indianapolis will significantly reduce the total cost of degree completion and provide even more excellent transfer options for students who wish to complete their degree while staying within the Indianapolis metropolitan area.” 

According to the agreements, Ivy Tech graduates from the aforementioned associate degree programs may transfer to the University of Indianapolis and apply a minimum of 60 credit hours from that completed degree to the requirements for a corresponding bachelor of science or art degree in the Shaheen College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences, or the School of Business. 

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

About Ivy Tech Community College

Ivy Tech Community College is Indiana’s largest public postsecondary institution and the nation’s largest singly accredited statewide community college system, accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. Ivy Tech has campuses throughout Indiana and also serves thousands of students annually online. It serves as the state’s engine of workforce development, offering associate degree and short-term certificate programs, and trainings that align to the needs of the community. The College also offers courses and associate degree programs that seamlessly transfer to other colleges and universities in Indiana, as well as out of state, for a more affordable route to a Bachelor’s degree.

University of Indianapolis partners with the Financial Planning Association to present virtual Financial Planning Day Jan. 30th

INDIANAPOLIS—The University of Indianapolis’ School of Business and the Financial Planning Association will partner to present Financial Planning Day on January 30, 2021, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The event is open to members of the community for free financial planning services from certified financial advisors. Interview opportunities are available both virtually and in person with the University of Indianapolis’ Student Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) President Emily Muckerheide and Pro Bono Co-Director of FPA Chad Reed.

Financial Planning Day, hosted by the University of Indianapolis’ School of Business in partnership with the Financial Planning Association, helps bring the knowledge and expertise of certified financial planners (CFPs) to the Indianapolis community. Receive FREE advice, via Zoom, from Indy’s best CFPs to assist in an array of financial situations. Among the offered services include: credit/debt management, estate planning, government benefits, and personal budgeting. The Financial Planning Association is eager to help members of the community during these unprecedented times and UIndy is proud to live out its “Education for Service” motto through this event.

Learn more and register here.

The Financial Planning Association® (FPA®) is the primary membership organization for financial planning practitioners who want to master the practice of financial planning, and who are committed to shaping the future of the profession.

Applied Learning is the key to the UIndy School of Business. From managing a portfolio of real money in the UIndy Student Fund to working directly with clients on project management, UIndy students “learn by doing.” Both undergraduate and graduate courses are taught by dedicated faculty, many of whom have many years of real-world experience they bring to the classroom. In addition to the classroom, students gain valuable internship experiences at nearly 100 different businesses each year and are well-prepared to enter the job market or advance in their careers upon graduation.

Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning announces final cohort of Rural Early College Network schools

Five Indiana high schools will join the Rural Early College Network (RECN) to help students earn college credit while they complete their high school education. Each school will receive $120,000 over three years as they work with the University of Indianapolis Center for Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL) and a mentor high school. 

CELL established the Rural Early College Network through a $7.9 million grant from the federal Education Innovation and Research program administered by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Elementary and Secondary Education. RECN helps rural Indiana schools more quickly implement the Early College high school model. Early College targets underserved students and allows them to earn both high school diplomas and up to two years of credits toward bachelor’s or associate degrees through rigorous dual credit classes supported by wrap-around services.

A total of 20 schools will be participating in RECN, with these five schools being the final group to join the project:

Frontier Jr-Sr High School
Seeger Memorial Jr-Sr High School
Shoals Community High School
Southridge High School
Sheridan High School

“We are excited to welcome these high schools to the Rural Early College Network (RECN) project. Funding and support provided to these schools will help to develop Early College programming for underserved students, allowing them to earn a high school diploma with up to two years of college credits. Our team is excited to work with the educators at these five schools to support innovative opportunities for Hoosier students,” said Carey Dahncke, CELL executive director.

Recipient schools may use the funds for teacher credentialing for dual credit instruction, professional development, travel to RECN meetings and conferences, and other items that each school specifically needs to support the students and staff.  Schools also receive professional development on work-based learning and career readiness activities for students.  

About CELL
Created in 2001, the Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL) at the University of Indianapolis has served as the leading convener, catalyst and collaborator for innovative education change. CELL’s mission is for all people in Indiana to experience meaningful and high-quality education. CELL partners with schools and communities to improve outcomes for students of all ages by leading sustainable educational innovation and transformation across Indiana. Providing leadership that is both cutting-edge and action-oriented, CELL unites districts, schools, communities, universities and businesses to build a sense of urgency and form innovative collaborations for statewide educational and economic improvement. Learn more: cell.uindy.edu.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

University of Indianapolis hosts virtual 44th Annual Lugar Symposium

NPR’s Steve Inskeep to host annual symposium for high school juniors

INDIANAPOLIS—The 44th annual Richard G. Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow’s Leaders featuring NPR’s Steve Inskeep, hosted by The Richard G. Lugar Academy at the University of Indianapolis, will move to a virtual format to bring together hundreds of top high school juniors from Indiana for a day of discussion on public issues and world events on Saturday, December 5. 

Richard G. Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow's Leaders featuring NPR's Steve Inskeep on Saturday, December 7, 2019. (Photo by D. Todd Moore/ University of Indianapolis)

Richard G. Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow’s Leaders featuring NPR’s Steve Inskeep on Saturday, December 7, 2019. (Photo by D. Todd Moore/ University of Indianapolis)

Journalist, author and host of National Public Radio’s Morning Edition Steve Inskeep will be the keynote speaker. Inskeep will discuss the concept of public service and how students can serve the greater good, both now and in their future careers.

Part of the expansive legacy former Indiana Senator Richard G. Lugar created in his lifetime, more than 20,000 students have benefited from the symposium in over four decades. The Lugar Academy is committed to maintaining Sen. Lugar’s legacy by continuing with his signature event.

Students will select from a variety of breakout sessions on current topical issues, including the 2020 presidential election, systemic racism, crisis leadership and the role of the United States in international relations. In keeping with Senator Lugar’s tradition of evaluating issues based on merit, the Symposium ensures students are presented with a balanced view of the issues, rather than a partisan viewpoint.

The Lugar Symposium will start at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, December 5, 2020. Members of the public are encouraged to join the virtual keynote by registering via this link.

About the Lugar Academy
More than 20,000 promising students have participated in the Lugar Symposium during the past four decades, gaining wisdom, insight and access to some of the finest minds available. Principals from every high school in Indiana are asked to select three outstanding student leaders from their junior class to attend the Symposium. Sen. Richard G. Lugar (April 4, 1932 – April 28, 2019) served as a Distinguished Trustee, a former professor of political science and received an honorary degree from the University of Indianapolis, among 46 colleges and universities which bestowed Lugar with the honor during his lifetime. Lugar was a fifth-generation Hoosier who left the United States Senate as the longest-serving member of Congress in Indiana history. The symposium that bears his name was launched in 1977 as an opportunity to discuss with students topics of local and global importance.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

University of Indianapolis history faculty Edward O. Frantz collaborates with Indiana political mainstay John Mutz on new autobiography

“An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story,”

“An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story”

“An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story” from IHS Press chronicles life of former Indiana lieutenant governor

 

INDIANAPOLIS—A collaboration between Edward O. Frantz, professor and department chair of history at the University of Indianapolis, and longtime Indiana politician John Mutz, explores the role of Mutz’s career in shaping what the city of Indianapolis looks like today.

“An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story,” published by the Indiana Historical Society (IHS) Press, provides a comprehensive overview of Mutz’s expertise in politics, philanthropy and business. Mutz helped establish Indianapolis’ reputation as a sports business hub and was the person most responsible for bringing the Subaru plant to Lafayette, Ind., a move that reinvigorated manufacturing throughout the Hoosier state.

“John Mutz is one of the people who helped to dramatically transform Indianapolis,” Frantz said. “His character, emotional intelligence, and leadership have helped to inspire scores of Hoosiers; I am so happy to play a part in helping to tell his story.”

Photo of Prof. Frantz available here.

Mutz, who served Indiana in the General Assembly (1967-1971), State Senate (1972-1980) and as lieutenant governor of Indiana (1981-1989), is one of only two surviving architects of Unigov. He authored the bill that rewrote Indiana’s school funding formula and co-sponsored the bill that created White River State Park. His philanthropic achievements include establishing the Lumina Foundation, where he served as board chair (2002-2010), and serving as president of the Lilly Endowment (1989-1993), where he oversaw the major initiative Giving Indiana Funds for Tomorrow, resulting in $2 billion committed across the state.

In this book, Mutz collaborates with American historian Frantz, author of “The Door of Hope: Republican Presidents and the First Southern Strategy, 1877–1933,” and editor of “A Companion to the Reconstruction Presidents.” Working together, Mutz and Frantz have combined the perspective and experience of an accomplished leader with the insight of a political historian. Mutz’s gratitude about the life he has led is the motivating force behind “An Examined Life.” This book represents a culminating contribution to Indiana’s civic life by imparting the life experiences of a man who uniquely merged politics, business and philanthropy.

Edward O. Frantz, professor of history

Edward O. Frantz, professor of history

“John often talks about many of the events of his life being a series of happy accidents,” Frantz said. “This project was the happiest of accidents I could have ever hoped for. Given John’s experience in politics, philanthropy and corporate governance, this book is unique in that it is both a memoir and a look at some of the most consequential changes in modern Indianapolis. John’s life has provided me with a lifetime’s worth of lessons.”

“An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story” is available through IHS’s Basile History Market and other places books are sold.

About the Authors

John M. Mutz served as lieutenant governor of Indiana from 1981 to 1989. A recognized leader in politics, philanthropy and business, Mutz is the author of “Fundraising for Dummies.” Edward O. Frantz is an American historian and author of “The Door of Hope: Republican Presidents and the First Southern Strategy, 1877–1933,” and editor of “A Companion to the Reconstruction Presidents.”

**********************************

Title: An Examined Life: The John Mutz Story

Publisher: Indiana Historical Society Press

Pages: 223

Size: 6 x 9

Cover: Hardcover

Publication Date: September 2020

Cost: $24.95

ISBN: 978-0-87195-444-2

University of Indianapolis receives $100,000 grant from Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation to expand Art & Design facilities

A $100,000 grant from the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation will expand opportunities for University of Indianapolis students, faculty, staff and art lovers throughout the Midwest to connect with the fine arts. The grant will support a significant facility upgrade and expansion that meets the Department of Art & Design’s growing needs to accommodate more students and to continue to meet the accrediting standards set by the National Association for Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). 

Through the expansion, the Department’s space will increase by 73 percent from 15,000 square feet to 26,000. The project includes the renovation of an existing building on campus and a reorganization of space within the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center. The additional, repurposed building will include spaces for a sculpture studio (both wood and metal), ceramics, art therapy space, a new student gallery, studio classroom, two offices and storage space. Reorganization and updating of the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center will allow expansion of the printmaking studio, digital photography studio, animation/illustration digital studio and a studio classroom. 

“This initiative plays a critical role in helping the University of Indianapolis expand our facilities to accommodate the increasing enrollments in our Art & Design programs,” said President Robert L. Manuel. “We are grateful to the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation for their support of this project, which allows the University to grow its impact and build innovative connections between students, faculty, staff and the community.”

The University of Indianapolis Art & Design program is one of only 300+ schools in the nation to be accredited by the National Association for Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). The expansion will fulfill the Department of Art & Design’s growing program demands and continued accreditation requirements of the NASAD.

With programs in studio art, visual communication design, pre-art therapy and art education, the University of Indianapolis Department of Art & Design also offers concentrations in drawing, painting, ceramics, digital photography, printmaking, sculpture and animation/illustration. The expansion will provide the additional space required to facilitate the department’s expanding programs and to grow the department’s interdisciplinary collaborations both inside and outside of the University. During the last five years, innovative programs have connected students with regional and national networks of artists and community organizations. Faculty-led projects such as the “River Fish” sculpture along the White River and a hanging sculpture for the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra’s 2020 Beethoven Series have created hands-on learning experiences for students while further reinforcing the department’s reputation for artistic excellence.

“Students have shared that they choose UIndy’s Art & Design program due to its outstanding reputation for quality and supportive faculty. This expansion shows prospective and current students that the University highly values our Art & Design program and our students. This project also demonstrates the priority the University gives to providing access to art and cultural events on the southside of Indianapolis and growing our role as a vital community anchor,” said Mary Moore, interim dean of the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences.

About the University of Indianapolis Department of Art & Design
The University of Indianapolis Art & Design program is the largest Art & Design program at a private university in central Indiana. It is one of only 300+ schools in the nation to be accredited by the National Association for Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). The department, which will celebrate its centennial anniversary in 2023, has been educating students with the vision to teach them proficiency in the fundamentals of art, improve their understanding of artistic heritage and culture, enhance their critical thinking abilities, endow them with artistic skills, stimulate their imaginations and improve their knowledge base to further enhance the art community in Indiana and beyond. 

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

 

University of Indianapolis Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning partners with INvestEd, State Higher Ed commission to help Indiana dual credit teachers obtain credentials

The Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL) at the University of Indianapolis will partner with the Indiana Higher Education Commission (ICHE) and INvestEd to meet the need for qualified teachers to deliver dual credit coursework in Indiana’s K-12 schools.

Teach Dual Credit Indiana is a partnership between ICHE and INvestEd to ensure that Indiana high school teachers are equipped and qualified to teach dual credit courses. Dual credit courses allow students to earn college credit and high school credit at the same time—preparing them for college and saving them time and money when they get there. CELL will be administering the program, which includes providing the funding to postsecondary institutions for tuition and books for teachers who are seeking to fulfill dual credit credentialing requirements as set forth by the regional college accreditor Higher Learning Commission (HLC).

Beginning September 1, 2023, high school educators who teach dual credit courses are required to have a master’s degree and at least 18 credit hours of instruction in the subject they teach. The credentialing rules were put into place by HLC. Earlier this year, Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers requested and received an additional one-year extension from HLC for Indiana teachers to meet these requirements.

INvestEd is providing a $3 million grant for Hoosier teachers to receive the necessary credit hours, up to 18 in total. The grant could fully qualify between 200 and 700 teachers, depending on how many credits teachers take. There are currently more than 560 Indiana teachers who have master’s degrees but lack the 18 hours.

“We are thrilled to be partnering with the Indiana Commission for Higher Education and INvestEd on this project,” said Carey Dahncke, executive director of the University of Indianapolis Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL). “Ensuring student success in post-secondary endeavors, particularly when those are collegiate aspirations, has been central to our Early College and STEM Teach work. With the looming shortage of qualified teachers to deliver dual credit course work in Indiana’s K-12 schools – Teach Dual Credit Indiana is desperately needed. Soon teachers across the state will have access to graduate education opportunities at a wide range of Hoosier universities to ensure we have enough secondary teachers that meet the Higher Learning Commission’s requirements for teaching dual credit courses in Indiana’s high schools.”

“Indiana’s dual credit teachers can become fully credentialed to meet the HLC requirements at no cost to them, thanks to the support of INvestEd and through the state’s partnership with CELL,” said Indiana Commissioner for Higher Education Teresa Lubbers. “Hoosier students who have the opportunity to take dual credit courses in high school go to college at higher rates are more likely to succeed in college and to graduate on time, saving students and families time and money. Ensuring all students in Indiana have access to dual credit courses taught by credentialed teachers can also help close the state’s educational opportunity gaps, as the benefits of dual credit are seen across all races, ethnicities and socioeconomic statuses.”

CELL is encouraging postsecondary institutions to submit proposals to offer courses through Teach Dual Credit Indiana. Tuition for courses, along with books and materials, will be provided at no cost to dual credit teachers employed at Indiana public, including charter schools, and accredited private schools. Courses will be offered in the winter, spring and summer 2021 and may be offered in an online or hybrid mode of delivery.

Teachers with a master’s degree who need more credits can learn more about how to access grant funds and postsecondary institutions can review and submit a Request for Proposal at TeachDualCredit.org.

“CELL is excited to launch Teach Dual Credit Indiana and begin funding teachers to take the graduate courses necessary to meet credentialing requirements to teach dual credit classes in non-STEM fields such as English and Social Studies. Teach Dual Credit Indiana is a program similar to STEM Teach which provides funding for dual credit teachers in STEM fields. We look forward to continuing to serve teachers and schools so that they can provide ample dual credit opportunities to high school students. In the end, this results in making the transition to college easier and more affordable for students as they earn college credits while still enrolled in high school,” said Trish Wlodarczyk, director of strategic initiatives, STEM Teach IV, CELL. 

ICHE estimates dual credit completion saves Hoosier students $69 million in postsecondary tuition and fees annually. One-third of students who complete dual credit courses in Indiana are from low-income households.

About CELL
Created in 2001, the Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL) at the University of Indianapolis has served as the leading convener, catalyst and collaborator for innovative education change. CELL’s mission is for all people in Indiana to experience meaningful and high-quality education. CELL partners with schools and communities to improve outcomes for students of all ages by leading sustainable educational innovation and transformation across Indiana. Providing leadership that is both cutting-edge and action-oriented, CELL unites districts, schools, communities, universities and businesses to build a sense of urgency and form innovative collaborations for statewide educational and economic improvement. Learn more: cell.uindy.edu.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

University of Indianapolis announces world-renowned ecologist Nalini Nadkarni as 2020 honorary degree recipient

Nalini Nadkarni

Nalini Nadkarni

The University of Indianapolis will present an honorary degree to Nalini Nadkarni, forest ecologist and science communicator, during the December 2020 Commencement ceremonies.

A pioneer in the study of the Costa Rican rainforest canopy, Nadkarni has dedicated her career to ground-breaking research and public engagement. Her academic research interests include the ecological roles that canopy-dwelling plants play in forests at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and the effects of forest fragmentation and climate change on the biodiversity and ecosystem function of canopy communities. Her research is supported by the National Science Foundation, the National Geographic Society and the Mellon Foundation.

Nadkarni is recognized as a dedicated educator and communicator who uses nontraditional pathways to make scientific knowledge accessible to wider audiences and to raise awareness of nature’s importance to human lives. She has innovated bringing science education, conservation projects and nature imagery to the incarcerated. In 2003, she co-created the Sustainability in Prison Program in Washington State, and in 2011, created the Initiative to bring Science Programs to the Incarcerated (INSPIRE). These programs bring multiple benefits for inmates, scientists, correctional institutions, and the community.

“Throughout her career, Nalini Nadkarni has demonstrated a remarkable commitment to connecting her academic expertise with broader audiences while continuing her critical research on rainforest ecology. The impact of her work is immeasurable. The University of Indianapolis is deeply proud to recognize her career with an honorary degree and to highlight her shining example of our university mission, ‘education for service,’” said President Robert L. Manuel.

An Emeritus Professor at The Evergreen State College, Nadkarni currently is a professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Utah. She collaborates with a wide range of humanists, creative writers, poets, dancers, musicians and visual artists to better understand and communicate the relationships between nature and humans. Her work has included developing moss growing techniques with prisoners, as well as bringing artists, like musician and biologist G. Duke Brady, into the forest canopy to write and perform.

Nadkarni is deeply committed to public engagement with science. In 1994, she co-founded the International Canopy Network, a non-profit organization that fosters communication among researchers, educators, and conservationists concerned with forest canopies. Her work has been featured in media outlets including the Guardian, Natural History, Glamour, “Good Morning America,” Bill Nye the Science Guy and many more. She has given two TED talks (Conserving the Canopy and Life Science in Prison) and more than 25 endowed lectures around the world. She is the author of two books, “Between the Earth and Sky” (2002) and “Kingfisher Voyages: Rain Forest” (2006).

Nadkarni is the recipient of multiple honors and awards, including the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship (2001), the Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellowship (2004), the J. Sterling Morton Award from the National Arbor Day Foundation, the Grace Hopper Lifetime Achievement Award, the Public Service Award from the National Science Board (2010), the AAAS Public Engagement With Science Award (2011), the Monito del Giardino Prize for Environmental Action (2012), an Honorary Doctorate of Science from Brown University (2014), Time Magazine’s Best Inventions of 2014: “Blue Room, the prison room that helps inmates relax,” Washington State University’s William Julius Wilson Award for the Advancement of Social Justice (2015), Wings Worldquest, Women of Discovery Awards (2018) and Inspiring Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists (2019), among others.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

 

 

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