Alumnus designs Good Hall model for 2017 holiday card

Visual communication design graduate Daniel Del Real ’05 offered his creative talents for this year’s University of Indianapolis holiday card.

Daniel Del RealGood Hall was an easy subject choice for Del Real—it’s where he held his first public art show during his senior year and he attended classes there every semester as a student as well.

“UIndy has managed to keep that tradition going today,” Del Real said. “All students are still going into this building for classes during their time on campus.”

While designing the card, Del Real built a scale model of Good Hall and adorned the building with miniature holiday decorations, ribbons on the columns and artificial snow. He even provided lighting on the inside of the model. He said he drew his inspiration from a card he received from a friend depicting a Christmas village. Once the model was finished, he photographed it for the University’s holiday card.

“It’s really wonderful to give back to the University,” Del Real said. “My fours years at UIndy were some of the best years of my life. So, to see that it has come full circle, I was glad to create this for UIndy.”

Del Real explained his biggest challenge was getting the proportions right. To do this, he said he measured the windows on several images provided by the University to assign a scale for each detail of the building, including the bricks, molding, columns and steps. Watch this short video to hear about his creative process.  

Because renovations are underway to restore Good Hall’s two-story portico and six columns at the main entrance, Del Real said, “this is an opportunity for incoming students to really see the potential of the building with the portico.”

The scale model of Good Hall will be on display at the Krannert Memorial Library following the holiday break.

Del Real is the resident artist at the International Marketplace Coalition, working to forge relationships between businesses, community and artists through public art programs and installations that enrich the International Marketplace neighborhood on Indy’s northwest side.

He received the University’s Distinguished Young Alumni Award at the Honors & Recognition Dinner in September. He also partnered with current students to create greyhound vignettes that were on display at that Homecoming event.

Proposed Tax Plan Could Hurt Indiana Students

The proposed changes to our tax codes being considered by the U.S. Congress will negatively impact our regional economic competitiveness by limiting the ability for Hoosiers to earn a college degree. As for our tax code, clearly it is time to think about better ways to manage how and why we tax. But, in the case of the current tax changes under consideration, the sweeping impact to higher education will have a devastating effect to our communities in the long term.

Higher education serves as as catalyst for positive change in workforce development, economic revitalization and bolstering our quality of life. The more people earning a college degree or credential, the more competitive our region becomes in attracting businesses, creating new ones, filling workforce needs, and supporting an informed citizenry.

At a time when our country should be making higher education more accessible and affordable, these changes threaten many benefits that fundamentally impact the ability of students to attend college. The proposal, up for a vote by the U.S. Senate as early as Friday, will cost institutions, parents, and students an additional $65 billion over the next 10 years, according to the American Council on Education.

The impact of the proposed changes on higher education will make it more costly for universities to access debt to improve learning facilities, provide funding opportunities for students and create environments of innovation. More than 12 million people benefit from student loan interest deductions each year, which the proposed legislation would eliminate. This is money that not only helps students and families pay for college but also allows for more investment to support a strong economy. Students who receive tuition waivers now face the prospect of those funds being considered as taxable income. The proposal also would tax endowments at institutions across the country that support student success. In addition, tuition reimbursement programs–a valuable tool for attracting talent and helping university employees afford college for themselves and their children–also soon could be considered taxable income.

The proposed changes ultimately will have the effect of adding to the growing $1.4 trillion in student debt that continues to weigh heavily on college graduates today. They also will have a chilling effect on enrollments, which will create a long-term decline in our state’s talent base for the future.

The University of Indianapolis has a proud tradition of welcoming first-generation college students (about 40 percent of total enrollment each year). More than 86 percent of our alumni choose to live in Indiana, and our University offers more than $48 million dollars of its own money to help talented students earn a college degree. All of the other institutions of higher education in our state provide similar benefits to the region.

The proposal before Congress also will have consequences for our regional economic development well into the future. Indiana has a long-standing commitment to bolstering the intellectual capital in our state. We are recognized as a state that incubates technological innovations, attracts new business, and provides one of the most enviable standards of living in the country. These proposed changes will increase the chances that we will lose our economic momentum and slow the advances we have made in preparing a 21st Century workforce. These are the core engines of success in Indiana, and any future changes to the tax code should be mindful of the important role higher education plays in safeguarding them.

 

Robert L. Manuel
University of Indianapolis President

 

Contact
David Hosick
Director of Communication
317-410-5992