Sutphin Center for Clinical Care strengthens community partnerships

Dedication of the Sutphin Center for Clinical Care in the UIndy Health Pavilion on Thursday, August 24, 2017. Program and group photo at the end: Christopher Molloy VP for Advancement was MC with remarks from Stephen Kiley, Senior Vice President South Region for Community Hospitals, Dr. Stephanie Kelly, Dean College of Health Sciences (CHS), Ashley Boyer Mahin, NP '16, a family nurse practitioner, and Charles Sutphin. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Dedication of the Sutphin Center for Clinical Care in the UIndy Health Pavilion on Thursday, August 24, 2017. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

The Sutphin family legacy at the University of Indianapolis ushered in a new chapter with the dedication of the Sutphin Center for Clinical Care in the UIndy Health Pavilion in August 2017.

The Center commemorates Dudley and Mary Louise Sutphin and strengthens the University of Indianapolis’ commitment to building partnerships that create better health outcomes for underserved populations. The Center brings together critical services within the UIndy Health Pavilion, including physical therapy, medical and behavioral health clinics.

The Center, originally located in Fountain Square, will continue the University’s work to combine improved access to health care with advancement of education initiatives in the health professions.

“The Sutphin Center for Clinical Care provides an important place for our students, faculty, and community members to come together. We can extend our applied clinic teaching experiences, and offer support to enhance the health and wellness of our community at the same time,” said University of Indianapolis President Robert L. Manuel.  

By serving multifaceted needs through services such as rehabilitation, health and wellness and mental health, Manuel praised the interprofessional culture that serves as the backbone of the Sutphin Center’s philosophy. Students have the opportunity to work alongside Community Health Network clinicians and to collaborate with students in other health disciplines.

“As educators, we know students learn best in real-life environments, so the addition of the Sutphin Center in space just downstairs from classroom learning is a valuable resource for the UIndy health professions. Students will have opportunities for internships, focused learning activities, interprofessional learning and research that is right at their doorstep,” said Stephanie Kelly, dean of the College of Health Sciences.

Vice President for University Advancement Chris Molloy noted the longstanding relationship between the Sutphins and the University.

“The Sutphin family has been a longtime supporter of the University of Indianapolis in its mission to reach out to the community, and the Center positions the University to continue to make a positive impact,” said Molloy.

The Sutphin family has a long history of supporting the University of Indianapolis beginning with the establishment of the Sutphin Lectures in the Humanities, endowed in memory of Samuel B. Sutphin by his sons Dudley V. and Samuel Reid Sutphin. Charlie Sutphin, who is Dudley’s son and Samuel’s grandson, continues to support both the Sutphin Lectures and the Sutphin Center for Clinical Care.

At a recent dedication ceremony, Charlie Sutphin noted the strong ties between his family and the University. He shared the story of his father receiving an honorary degree in 1992.

“I saw how much that meant to him, and it sustained my ongoing interest in the University of Indianapolis,” Sutphin said.

Sutphin encouraged students to get involved in volunteer or outreach opportunities, noting the value of community connections.

“We should all strive to belong to a group that is greater than ourselves,” Sutphin said.

University of Indianapolis announces 2017-18 performing arts season

Fall lineup offers wide variety of world-class classical, jazz and piano concerts, theatre, fine arts and film

The University of Indianapolis delivers a broad range of diverse cultural activities to the Indianapolis metropolitan area with the announcement of the 2017-18 performing arts season. The campus serves as a destination point for vocal and instrumental music performances, theatre productions, art exhibitions, readings and lectures and highlights a progressive arts and musical culture in the region. Fall performances at UIndy include the Indianapolis Quartet, a celebration of Artist-in-Residence Raymond Leppard’s 90th birthday and pianist and Artist-in-Residence Drew Petersen.

The University has launched a new interactive website, events.uindy.edu, to coincide with the start of the fall performing arts season. See the website for event details and ticket information.

University Faculty Concert Series is sponsored by Katz, Sapper & Miller.

Joana Genova, second violinist, Indianapolis Quartet

Joana Genova, second violinist, Indianapolis Quartet

The Indianapolis Quartet, which returns Oct. 2 with a concert at Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, continues to showcase the elite musical talent in Indianapolis and the greater Midwest. The ensemble of world-renowned musicians welcomes new second violinist Joana Genova, who joins the University faculty, and fellow musicians Zachary De Pue, concertmaster of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, on violin; Michael Isaac Strauss, former principal violist for the ISO, on viola; Austin Huntington, principal cellist of the ISO, on cello with guest clarinetist Todd Palmer. Genova has an illustrious career as a chamber musician, orchestral player, teacher, and soloist performing throughout Europe and is a former concertmaster of the Amsterdam Bach Consort and a member of Amsterdam Sinfonietta.

The concert will feature major works associated with Vienna, from the Classical procedures in Beethoven’s G-Major Quartet, Op. 18, No. 2, to the lyrical intensity of Johannes Brahms in his A-minor quartet, Op. 51, No. 2. Three-time Grammy-nominated clarinetist Todd Palmer joins the Quartet for Mozart’s eloquent 1789 masterpiece, the Quintet for clarinet and strings, K. 581.
7:30 p.m., Oct. 2, Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center.

The Quartet, which formed in 2016, is the result of a collaboration between the University and the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. The project was made possible, in part, through a transformational gift by University trustee and philanthropist Yvonne Shaheen, namesake of the  Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences. This year, the Quartet also was awarded a $100,000 grant from the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation.

Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, a Viennese-style performance hall housed in the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center on campus, has hosted thousands of world-class performers since being built in 1994.

To arrange an interview or on-set performance with the Indianapolis Quartet, contact Sara Galer at galers@uindy.edu.

Faculty Artist Concert Series gala opening with Maestro Raymond Leppard presented by Katz, KSM, Sapper and Miller on September 19, 2016.

Faculty Artist Concert Series gala opening with Maestro Raymond Leppard presented by Katz, KSM, Sapper and Miller on September 19, 2016.

Maestro Raymond Leppard 90th Birthday Celebration features Artist-in-Residence Raymond Leppard, who also is conductor laureate of the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra. Maestro Leppard, one of the most respected international conductors of modern times, has appeared with multiple leading orchestras across the world in more than 60 years on the podium. The performance features the University of Indianapolis Festival Orchestra and Choral Ensemble, with Zachary De Pue on violin, Michael Isaac Strauss on viola, Kathleen Hacker, soprano, and Daniel Narducci, baritone. The event celebrates Maestro Leppard’s 90th birthday with music of Mozart, Schubert and Sir Edward Elgar.  –7:30 p.m, Sept. 18, Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center.

Drew Petersen, University of Indianapolis artist-in-residence and American Pianists Association Award winner

Drew Petersen, University of Indianapolis artist-in-residence, Christel DeHaan fellow and American Pianists Association Award winner

Drew Petersen, winner of the 2017 American Pianists Awards and the Christel DeHaan Fellowship of the American Pianists Association, will perform Sept. 25. Petersen has been named artist-in-residence for two years by the University of Indianapolis, where he will perform and teach with faculty and students as part of a unique partnership with the American Pianists Association. He  has been a prizewinner in major international competitions (Leeds, Hilton Head, Kosciuszko Foundation) and has been profiled in the New York Times, New York Magazine and the documentary Just Normal.7:30 p.m., Sept. 25, Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center.

Other fall highlights include the Kenny Phelps All-Stars Sept. 6, “Pressing On: The Letterpress Film” Sept. 20, “Frankenstein” starting with free previews Oct. 26 and the world premiere of “The Mary Shelley Project” by local playwright K.T. Peterson on Oct. 31.

See a complete list of the UIndy 2017-18 performing arts season at events.uindy.edu.

UIndy students engage with past through hands-on fieldwork

From the Texas borderlands to ancient Rome to back home in Indiana, University of Indianapolis students continue to unearth history, gain valuable field experience and make a global impact. baumslanding

Students participating in the University’s archaeological field school spent the summer excavating the Baum’s Landing site near Delphi in Carroll County, Ind. The group, working under the guidance of Dr. Christopher Moore, associate professor and chair of anthropology, studied early pioneer life in Indiana.

The field school immerses students in archaeology 40+ hours a week with a focus on excavation techniques as well as teamwork, critical thinking, community outreach and project design. The initiative also connects the community with Indiana history by opening the dig to residents, including local middle school students.

“We hope to develop a better understanding of how the Baums (who lived on the site from approximately 1820 to 1850) and their contemporaries established a new community identity as Hoosiers,” Moore said.

A Carroll County native, Moore founded the Wildcat Archaeological Research Project (WARP) in 2009 to investigate archaeology in Carroll County and surrounding areas, including Baum’s Landing. Among the goals for the excavation, Moore said, is learning details about the daily life, status and wealth of the pioneer family.

For the students, the experience provides intellectual and professional growth opportunities, including the development of leadership and supervision skills on everything from paperwork to excavation.

“This year’s field crew is exceptional. Over the last eight weeks, all of them have grown considerably, both in their knowledge and skills of archaeology and in their confidence,” Moore said.

Kaylee Blum

Kaylee Blum ’19

“The experience that I have gained from this project has helped me with my personal growth and my development as an archaeologist,” said archaeology student Kaylee Blum ’19, who has participated in several student digs. “There’s so much more to archaeology than I anticipated, but my time at UIndy has definitely been worth it. The hands-on experience that I have gained just as an undergraduate has been amazing beyond words.”

UIndy students can take part in numerous volunteer archaeological lab and field experiences starting in their freshman year, and applied, hands-on training is integrated into many archeology and anthropology courses. A public field archaeology event will be held at Skiles Test park in Indianapolis Sept. 16-17 and an archaeological field school is planned for next summer on Sapelo Island, Georgia.

“Students can get exposed to the challenges of real-world situations alongside the ideal scenarios that they read about in textbooks. This means that most students have some basic understanding of and practical skills in archaeological fieldwork before they start field school,” Moore added.

 

Global impact
Beyond Borders Team
Along with that real-life experience comes the opportunity to witness the community impact. Krista Latham, associate professor of biology and anthropology, leads a student forensic team comprised of biology majors on projects including the identification of individuals who died in the Texas borderlands, as well as assisting law enforcement during local crime scene investigations.

Latham’s work has gained national attention to the humanitarian crisis happening on the U.S. southern border. (Read more about the project here.) Latham and her team work to uncover remains from unmarked grave sites and identify the bodies of those who have died while making the journey to the United States. This year, four graduate students traveled to Texas with Latham to participate in the project, marking the sixth trip.

Graduate student Leann Rizor ’18 (human biology with focus in forensic anthropology) said the fieldwork has helped her to gain an appreciation of the magnitude of the crisis.

“I learned so much regarding the intricacies of the politics surrounding the crisis, and I have used this knowledge to talk about the crisis in a very informed way and to spread awareness,” said Rizor, who earned her bachelor’s degree in anthropology from the University in 2014.

International research opportunities

Jessica Gregory (center) and Jessica Chevrolet (left) in Chieti, Italy at the University Museum (Photo: Chris Schmidt)

Jessica Gregory (center) and Jessica Chevrolet (left) in Chieti, Italy at the University Museum (Photo: Chris Schmidt)

Research opportunities for UIndy students extend to the international arena. Chris Schmidt, professor of anthropology, worked with two UIndy graduate students in Italy this summer on his study of Herculaneum, an ancient Roman city destroyed when Mt. Vesuvius erupted in the year A.D. 79. Schmidt has been conducting research for several years at the site, focusing on what inhabitants ate, their ancestry and the way they died.

Schmidt was honored earlier this year with the 2017 Indiana Archaeology Award, along with Johnson County Commissioner Brian Baird and Johnson County attorney Kathleen Hash, for leading the Middle of the Road Grave project, which involved several UIndy students – including some graduate alumni who returned to participate. The goal of the project was to record, recover and reinter the seven individuals who were buried in the median of County Road 400 South.

“It is definitely a case where one person is being acknowledged for the others,” Schmidt said of the award. “It’s an award for the process and UIndy should be proud of that high level of professionalism.”

The site’s role in local folklore and regional history generated strong media interest, creating additional pressure on the excavation team. Nancy Kerlin Barnett and six others were buried at the site, which bears a historic marker commemorating their lives. While the topic of dealing with human remains is a sensitive one, Schmidt said by the end of the project, researchers had gained the respect of local residents.

“It was the best excavation experience I’ve ever had as a professional and working with the students, the state, the county and the museum,” he said.  “People know they can count on us to do it right.”

Written by Sara Galer, Senior Communications Specialist, University of Indianapolis. Contact newsdesk@UIndy.edu with your campus news.

UIndy Welcome Week: Slide show

The University of Indianapolis began Welcome Week with Move-In Day on Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017. Some 1,100 freshmen – UIndy’s largest class ever – will join the Greyhound student body for the fall semester.

The University will welcome more than 5,700 students for the fall 2017 semester, with more than 3,800 undergraduates, 450 School for Adult Learning undergraduates and 1,400 graduate students.

Mouse over the slide show to see photos from Move-In Day, Freshman Convocation and the Class of 2021 photo.

The University also welcomes more than 200 international students who represent roughly 68 countries. UIndy’s largest representations hail from China, Saudi Arabia and Canada. Other countries represented include: Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Belgium, Benin, Bermuda, Brazil, Cameroon, Chile, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Indiana, Indonesia, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Latvia, Liberia, Mexico, Nepal, Netherlands, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Peru, Poland, Romania, Russia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom and Zimbabwe.

 

Simulation exercise helps students focus on interprofessional teamwork

A man suddenly slips and falls in the stands at a basketball game at Nicoson Hall. He groans in pain as concerned onlookers jump to action. Athletic trainers quickly take their places around the patient and begin calling out instructions to protect his spine and head.

The sequence of events that follows–from the ambulance ride to the emergency room to post-trauma care and communication between medical professionals–plays out in a tightly choreographed event as trained health sciences students at the University of Indianapolis participate in a simulated emergency response scenario. The exercise allows the students a “real-life” opportunity to implement the interprofessional and collaborative training that is integral to today’s trending model of healthcare.

There’s a big push in all of our professions to work more interprofessionally. By giving students the opportunity to do that, that helps them to be more prepared for fieldwork, clinicals or internships,” said Alison Nichols, assistant professor of occupational therapy, one of several faculty members who helped to organize the simulation.

The carefully designed simulation provided students of several disciplines–nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, psychology and social work–a chance to collaborate at all levels of an emergency scenario. In this case, the patient simulated a serious injury at a campus event and was transported from Nicoson Hall to the UIndy Health Pavilion before being treated in the UIndy Simulation Center. Students coordinated the entire emergency response and treatment plan.

“I was amazed at how important it was for us to speak with each other and to know what each other was doing at all times. By communicating with each other, we could avoid repetition and streamline things for the patient,” said Mimi Chase ’19, a graduate student in social work.

That collaboration is an integral part of the unique and innovative partnership between Community Health Network and the University. Through an interprofessional and team-based approach to learning, students enter the workforce with beneficial experience of collaborating with a variety of healthcare specialities to best meet the patient’s needs amid an increasingly complex healthcare system.

“You are teaching students to look outside the boxes of their professions and look at the other members of the team so that they understand each other’s roles,” said Gurinder Hohl, director, UIndy-Community Health Network partnership.

Hohl explained how that philosophy can impact patient outcomes in a medical setting. Both from the patient and provider perspectives, it’s in everyone’s best interest to reduce hospital readmissions, she said. Effective communication across disciplines helps to improve that workflow.

“When a team is patient-centered, the added impact is that the patients manage their health better because they have resources that have been arranged for them,” Hohl said. If you don’t have that team-based handover, there are lost opportunities for patient care.”

Paige Buddenhagen ’19 and Jamal Edwards ’19, athletic training, worked on the patient in Nicoson before the ambulance arrived. Edwards was responsible for the patient’s head, which involved calling out instructions to his colleagues as they loaded the patient onto a spine board to avoid further injury, while Buddenhagen coordinated an ambulance.

“I definitely liked seeing the transition from EMS to nursing and how that all works,” Buddenhagen said. “Recognizing and responding in an efficient manner is critical to the patient’s health.”

Once the patient was admitted to the hospital, occupational and physical therapy students had the opportunity to collaborate and evaluate the patient’s abilities and needs.  Social work and psychology students had new roles to play when alcohol turned up as a factor in the case. Carrie Dettmer ’18, a student in the accelerated nursing program, explained that the team setting gave her confidence.

“When I came upon a situation with substance abuse with this particular simulation patient, I knew that I had the backup of social work and psych coming in behind me,” Dettmer said.

Nurses collaborated with psychologists and social workers to determine the resources available to help the patient with addiction issues.

Michael Craven ’20, clinical psychology doctoral candidate, played the role of staff psychologist at the hospital during the simulation.

“It’s the direction healthcare is going. Being able to have practice, learning what it’s like to work side by side with physical therapists, occupational therapists, social workers, prepares us incredibly to be able to function in that environment,” Craven said.

Written by Sara Galer, Senior Communications Specialist, University of Indianapolis. Contact newsdesk@UIndy.edu with your campus news.

New music faculty bring international success to classrooms and Indianapolis Quartet

The Department of Music in the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences is proud to announce the addition of widely acclaimed violinist Joana Genova as visiting instructor of violin/viola and director of Chamber Music Initiatives. Joana brings a wealth of international success as a musician, both in Europe and the United States and will support the momentum of the Indianapolis Quartet, one of the Midwest’s premiere string ensembles.

Joana, who is excited to join the UIndy family, has an active career as a chamber musician, orchestral player, teacher, and soloist. She first began playing the violin at age 6 in her native Bulgaria and made her solo debut at the age of 12 with the Plovdiv Chamber Orchestra and later was named the top prizewinner of the National Competition in Bulgaria. She earned a bachelor’s degree in music at the Conservatory of Amsterdam and a master’s degree in chamber music at the Rotterdam Conservatory in the Netherlands. She also is a former concertmaster of the Amsterdam Bach Consort and a member of Amsterdam Sinfonietta.

Much like other faculty in the Department of Music, Joana will help to expose music students to career opportunities and insight through the lens of professional musicians who have earned acclaim across the world. She will teach applied violin/viola courses and will co-direct the Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Ensembles with her husband, Ariel Rudiakov, who is recognized internationally as a violist and conductor.

“The Department of Music has a rich history of working with international musicians of the highest caliber,” said University Provost Stephen H. Kolison, Jr. “Joana’s success and reputation will provide wonderful advantages for our students and support the continued growth of the Indianapolis Quartet as one of the most dynamic and influential musical ensembles in the Midwest.”

In addition to her faculty duties, Joana will infuse a unique sound and musicianship to the Indianapolis Quartet, now in its second year but already recognized as a collection of world-class talent and an elite string ensemble. The Quartet, through its strong partnership with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, will continue its path to success and fulfill its vision as a prominent fixture in the national arts community. With funding support recently granted from the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation, the Quartet will continue to refine the artistic excellence of the ensemble by building on the repertoire of world-class music of the past, present, and future; performing in increasingly higher profile settings, and collaborating with musicians of the highest caliber. The Quartet’s goal is to enhance the cultural fabric of the city and region through both performance and educational outreach. 

She joins ISO concertmaster and violinist Zachary DePue, violist Michael Isaac Strauss and ISO principal cellist Austin Huntington in the Quartet. These musicians have earned international acclaim and are recognized among the most elite musicians in the region. After performing with Joana, Quartet members praised her musicianship and her professional and intelligent demeanor, which they said would help “raise the level of our artistry during this crucial time for The Indianapolis Quartet’s development.” The Quartet is next scheduled to perform in October.

Alumni breakfast recognizes nearly 300 Greyhounds employed at Eli Lilly

Nearly 300 University of Indianapolis alumni have worked for Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly and Company, a global healthcare leader and Fortune 500 company. The University held a special gathering this month to recognize their impact and the connections they’ve made worldwide. Several UIndy faculty and staff members reconnected with their former students at an alumni breakfast.

A brief program featured UIndy Board of Trustee member and Lilly employee Stephen Fry, UIndy President Rob Manuel and students Tyler Walden and Danielle Sparling, both of whom interned at Lilly. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

A brief program featured UIndy Board of Trustee member and Lilly employee Stephen Fry (pictured), UIndy President Rob Manuel and students Tyler Walden and Danielle Sparling, both of whom interned at Lilly. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

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First WeatherSTEM unit in Indiana installed at UIndy

When it comes to weather, the forecast in Indianapolis can be pretty unpredictable from one day to the next. A new weather station installed at the University of Indianapolis this week will help meteorologists and the community try to make more sense of incoming weather data. weatherstem_2

A solar-powered WeatherSTEM unit providing up-to-the-minute weather data on temperature, wind speed, humidity, rainfall, barometric pressure and many other statistics was installed atop the roof of the Schwitzer Student Center in mid-July. The system also has a sensor in the ground to report soil moisture and ground temperature.

The data from the unit is available now on an interactive website, an app, Facebook and Twitter – allowing the UIndy community and general public to monitor the weather near campus and receive alert notifications. The information is available 24 hours a day and will be used by different groups across campus for safety and research purposes.

The WeatherSTEM station is the result of UIndy faculty and student collaborations to bring new technology to monitor and research weather patterns and atmospheric conditions. Recent Earth-Space Science grad Carly Nicholson ’17 began discussing the idea of a weather station with associate professor Tim Duman nearly three years ago.

As a student, Nicholson branded her campus weather updates with the phrase “Stay Weather Safe.” But it was more than just a tagline. She said, “it’s a lifelong devotion to environmental awareness.”

This spring, she authored a grant to help find financial support for a WeatherSTEM unit. It didn’t take long for UIndy alumnus Bob Green ’70 to take action.

From left: Carly Nicholson '17, Dr. Tim Duman and Luke Hunnewell of WeatherSTEM.

From left: Carly Nicholson ’17, Dr. Tim Duman and Luke Hunnewell of WeatherSTEM.

“UIndy is now a hub of meteorological data. The campus and surrounding community have the opportunity to become more intimate with the weather they experience day to day with use of the WeatherSTEM website, app and social media,” says Nicholson who is currently pursuing her master’s in public affairs and environmental science at IU Bloomington.

Green’s gift to support the WeatherSTEM station is in honor and memory of Dr. William Gommel, a professor of Mathematics & Earth-Space Science at the University from 1965 to 1992.

“I have a hunch that Professor Gommel would be pleased to know that one of his favorite topics – meteorology – has an ongoing presence on the UIndy campus in the form of a live weather data system,” said UIndy alumnus Bob Green ’70.

Members of the community are invited to attend a special dedication ceremony of the WeatherSTEM weather station during Homecoming Weekend on Friday, September 29. Register now.

UIndy sends largest faculty delegation to service learning symposium

Transforming communities through service learning was the focus of this year’s 7th International Symposium on Service Learning, held at the National University of Ireland in Galway. The University of Indianapolis co-hosted the event with NUI Galway and Stellenbosch University (South Africa). screen-shot-2017-07-11-at-1-00-36-pm

UIndy had the largest faculty delegation attending the symposium, and several faculty members presented research on the impact of service learning and community engagement. Marianna Foulkrod, director of Service Learning & Community Engagement, served as co-chair.
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Renovations underway on Good Hall main entrance

The oldest and most iconic building on the University of Indianapolis campus is getting a facelift. 

The front entrance to Good Hall, which has been cordoned off for the past term, is undergoing a restoration process that began in June and will continue through 2018. Renovation plans include refurbishing the building’s two-story portico and six columns at the main entrance. The campus landmark will also receive structural renovations to transform Good Hall into a learning environment that is more aligned with the needs of today’s students.

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