Indiana legislature honors undefeated Greyhounds Football team

The University of Indianapolis Greyhounds Football team was honored on the floor of the Indiana Statehouse on Thursday, celebrating an undefeated and record-breaking regular season.

Fans across the city and region got behind the Greyhounds in 2017 as they pursued a perfect 11-0 regular season. Despite a loss in the first round of the playoffs to Harding University, the program’s success — as well as that of other sports in 2017– helped to solidify University of Indianapolis athletics as one of the elite programs in Division II.

“Our athletics programs continue to succeed because our coaches, staff and the families of our student athletes create an exceptional environment for students to excel, both on and off the field. This undefeated season is another chapter in the growth of our athletic programs and the excitement they add to the UIndy campus experience,” said University President Robert Manuel.

Student athletes at the University earned a cumulative GPA of 3.26 last semester–a testament to how hard they work to achieve athletic and academic goals, Manuel added.

Indiana Rep. Jack Sandlin (R-Indianapolis) ‘78, ‘94 facilitated the recognition Thursday by the Indiana Legislature. Representing the football team were captains Jake Purichia, Andrew Walker, Aeneas White and Ruben Holcomb, along with coaches and athletics administrators.

“Coming downtown and being in this building to get recognized was special,” Purichia said. “I’m proud of our coaches, staff and players for what we’ve accomplished.”

“It was a huge honor getting recognized for the great season we had,” Holcomb added. “It was my last season so going out in such a successful way means a lot.”

The 2017 season was the first undefeated regular season since 1953. The team also set new records for the most wins in a season (11), consecutive wins (15) and scoring offense (38.2 ppg). The Greyhounds matched team and Great Lakes Valley Conference marks for fewest interceptions thrown (4) and garnered a conference record 14 GLVC Player of the Week awards, while leading the nation in the fewest sacks allowed (0.5 per game).

The Hounds spent a total of eight consecutive weeks in the Top 10, peaking at a program high No. 5 as they went on to capture their fifth GLVC title in six years.

The football success was just one of many accolades enjoyed by UIndy sports teams in 2017. Greyhounds earned the sixth consecutive GLVC All-Sports Trophy, presented annually to the university demonstrating the best all around performance in the league’s 20 sponsored sports. Other team achievements in 2017 include:

  • Men’s soccer were named GLVC Conference Champions.
  • Women’s Golf broke individual, team and conference records on the way to earning the fourth-consecutive top-five finish in the NCAA tournament.
  • Women’s tennis student-athletes Hanna Volikova and Alina Kislitskaya won the first ITA national doubles championship in program history.
  • Men’s and Women’s Diving currently are ranked in the Top 10 in Division II programs.
  • 253 Greyhound student-athletes were named to the GLVC All-Academic team.

“Our athletics success continues to produce benefits in recruitment and retention of students,” said Sue Willey, vice president for Intercollegiate Athletics at the University. “Being honored at the statehouse raises the profile of the team and the University as a whole. It’s a great honor and another positive development for the program that will motivate our student athletes and teams to continue their success.

Football Coach Bob Bartolomeo, who brought back 17 seniors this year, said the undefeated season was special because it has happened only twice since the program began.

“When you look at all the divisions and schools playing college football, it’s extremely difficult and takes a lot of work and effort to accomplish an undefeated season. That’s something we’re quite proud of,” said Bartolomeo, who also was named GLVC Coach of the Year.

Willey said she is excited about the future of the programs and their impact on the growth of the University.

Undergrad research experience prepares Honors College students for IU School of Medicine

Two seniors from the Ron & Laura Strain Honors College will pursue medical degrees at the Indiana University School of Medicine in fall 2018. Lauren Bryant ’18 (biology and psychology) plans to focus on child and adolescent psychiatry, and Casey Wendorff ’18 (biology major, chemistry minor, pre-med concentration) will concentrate on sports medicine, specializing in the knee, foot and ankle.

Bryant and Wendorff recently presented research posters at the National Collegiate Honors Council conference in Atlanta, Georgia. Both students point to unique research opportunities gained by participating in Honors College that set the stage for their success.

“Honors College challenges you and sets you apart from other students because it shows that you are not afraid to push yourself to the next level,” Wendorff said.

“The competition is fierce for those coveted post-graduate positions at medical, vet, and graduate schools,” said Kevin Gribbins, assistant professor of biology and Honors project advisor to both students. Gribbins said UIndy’s emphasis on pre-professional training and research launched Bryant and Wendorff to the top of the list at the institutions they applied to.

Bryant appreciated Gribbins’ focus on showing students how to use their academic research as leverage during the medical school application process.

“He talked to me about how I can market that wherever I choose to go,” she said.

Lauren Bryant and Casey Wendorff took part in a study abroad trip to the Galapagos Islands.

Lauren Bryant and Casey Wendorff took part in a study abroad trip to Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands with Profs. Gribbins and Stemke.

As the number of student applications rise for medical and graduate schools, Gribbins said institutions look for experiences that set applicants apart. UIndy’s Department of Biology, in tandem with Honors College, provides a way for students like Bryant and Wendorff to distinguish themselves through a graduate school-caliber research program for undergraduates.

“Lauren and Casey are great examples of that work. They not only have the grades and the MCAT scores but they have research credentials and peer-reviewed publications that make them stand out among other applicants for medical school,” Gribbins said.

Both students highlighted the opportunities they had at UIndy to develop and highlight the skills they will apply during their medical careers.

“My undergrad work provided me with the critical foundation of the principles, techniques and trends that I will learn and apply in medical school,” Wendorff said. “Also, the knowledge and applications that I learned through classes in chemistry, physics, psychology and biology set me up to perform exceptionally well on the MCAT, which was key in being admitted to medical school.”

Bryant appreciates the atmosphere of healthy competition that offers students the chance to excel. “All of the professors are very much into showcasing all of our researchers,” Bryant said.

Personalized mentorship formed a key aspect of the UIndy experience for Bryant and Wendorff. In addition to research opportunities and academic support throughout their undergraduate studies, those relationships led to letters of recommendation crucial to the application process.

Dr. Gribbins was very instrumental in helping me achieve my goals as he worked with me during research,” said Wendorff, who received an athletic scholarship during his senior year for cross country and track.

“My coaches, Kathy Casey and Brad Robinson, both instilled a hard work ethic in me,” he added.

“When I hit a snag, I always had a professor or advisor, someone reaching out their hand. I didn’t even have to go find them. Someone was already saying if you need me, here’s how to find me,” Bryant said.

Doug Stemke, associate professor of biology and Bryant’s pre-med advisor, was another mentor.

Lauren is the type of person you want your physician to be. She is bright, always well-prepared, friendly, communicates well and leaves no stone unturned. She’s always improving herself,” Stemke said.

Just as students benefit from UIndy’s teacher-student ratio, faculty take pride in student accomplishments.

“The greatest part for me is the opportunity to work with such amazing students in an atmosphere where we get to know our students as more than students, and we can advise them more closely to make sure they reach their very best as an undergraduate and that they have every opportunity to succeed once they leave UIndy. I think that is what we do very well in the biology department at UIndy!” Gribbins said.

University hosts 50th annual regional theatre festival

About 1,400 theatre enthusiasts from Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Wisconsin gathered at the University of Indianapolis recently for the 50th annual Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF).

The Department of Theatre hosted the week-long festival for Region III in January 2018. It was one of eight regional events across the country.

The festival included theatrical performances, workshops, scholarship competitions for acting, design and stage management students, along with professional networking opportunities.

“It’s a lot of fun to be immersed in theatre for a week,” said Penny Sornberger, associate professor of costume design. “It opens up opportunities for our students to meet fellow students from other schools, form new bonds, network with professionals in the field and get feedback on their work.”

About 30 University theatre students volunteered for and competed in the festival. *See a complete list of student competitors below.

Notable achievements included:

  • Carly Wagers ‘20 was a semifinalist in the Regional Design Projects Competition, ranking in the top 10 percent of 200 entries.
  • Zech Saenz ’19 won the Design Storm Competition for directing “The Most Wretched Deathbed Fever Dreams of Edgar Allan Poe.”
  • Daisy Grey ‘19 (director) and Jade Lynch ‘19 (sound design) were runners-up for their work on “La Boheme.”

Six theatre faculty members were instrumental in organizing activities: Penny Sornberger, Brad Wright, James Leagre, Casey Kearns, Christian McKinney and Jodi Bush.

During the festival, University Production Manager Christian McKinney received the Region III Faculty Service Award. Peers throughout Region III voted, selecting McKinney as the winner for her expertise in planning the event.

“It’s great to be recognized for all the hard work that went into this festival,” McKinney said. “The reason we do this is for the students. The experiences they gain and the contacts they make at this festival will help them far beyond their time here at UIndy.”  

Festival organizers persevered despite severe winter weather that threatened to interrupt scheduled events.

“We feel the festival was very successful, even with all the weather issues,” Sornberger said. “The show must go on. We’re theatre folks; that’s what we do!”

 

Congratulations to all University theatre students who competed:

 

Irene Ryan Scholarship Auditions:  

     Stephen Cox ‘18 & partner Carly Wagers ’20

     Mary Schreier ‘19 & partner Thomas Tutsie ’20

     Katie Carter ’20 & partner Clayton Rardon ’21

     Zech Saenz ’19 & partner Kelly Casey ’19

 

National KCACTF Awards for Theatrical Design Excellence Competition   

    Jade Lynch ‘19;  Sound Design for “Frankenstein”

 

National KCACTF Allied Design and Technology Award Competition

     Liesel Schmitz ‘20;  Creature Arm design for “Frankenstein”

     Pat Kizer ‘19;  Special Effects Makeup for “Frankenstein”

 

10-minute Play Festival

     Stephen Cox ‘18 Director; “Little Debbie”

 

Regional Design Projects Competition

     Emily Hart ‘19;  Costume Designs; “Eurydice”

     Carly Wagers ‘20; Costume Designs; “La Boheme”

 

Design Storm Competition

     Pat Kizer ’19; Make up Designer; “Eurydice”

     Kristine Storms ‘18; Costume Designs; “His Dark Materials”

     Daisy Grey ‘19; Director; “La Boheme”

     Jade Lynch ‘19; Sound Design; “La Boheme”

     Elizabeth Hollbrook ’18; Director; “Henry V”

     Emma Rund ‘20 ; Dramaturgy; “Henry V”

     Emily Hart ’19; Costume Designs; “Henry V”

     Zech Saenz ’19; Director; “The Most Wretched Deathbed Fever Dreams of Edgar Allan Poe”

Mayor Ballard to host summit for high school sophomores on campus

University of Indianapolis Visiting Fellow and former Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard will lead “Embracing the Future,” an on-campus discussion for high school sophomores.

Embracing the Future: Gregory A. Ballard Summit
10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, March 3
Ransburg Auditorium of Esch Hall

Mayor Ballard will deliver a keynote address, and students may choose to attend two afternoon sessions that touch on topics important to their personal and professional futures. The sessions will involve influential leaders from a variety of industries across Indianapolis. Topics include the “Future of Sports,” “Innovation,” “Fail Fest: Celebrating Failure’s Role in Innovation” and “Oil and National Security.”

All attendees also will have their photo taken with Mayor Ballard and are invited to participate in a Q & A session. Lunch is provided, and the event is free. It is an invitation-only event.

Registration is now open! Teachers and administrators are encouraged to nominate three outstanding sophomore high school students who have an interest in sports, technology, business or the environment. Click here to submit nominations. All successful nominees will be contacted in February.

Learn more about the event.

imc_17_ballardsummit

 

School of Nursing to host statewide convention

The University of Indianapolis School of Nursing will host the Indiana Association of Nursing Students (IANS) 2018 Convention on campus January 26 – 27, 2018.

About 400 nursing students from across the state are expected to attend. The theme for the event will be “Nursing School Survival Guide.” Workshops will prepare students for a successful career and provide valuable networking opportunities with peers and with representatives from various community partners in the healthcare field.

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Jane Toon, associate professor of nursing, helped organize the event. She said it’s exciting to host this conference because it’s the first time the University will host an event of this type and magnitude.

“We are honored to be asked to host this event since it means that UIndy is well-respected in the community at large, as well is within the healthcare field,” Toon said. “UIndy has had its own Student Nurse Association for many years, but this brings the University’s involvement in a student-led nursing association to a whole new level.”

The graduate program in the School of Nursing at the University of Indianapolis is ranked among the best graduate nursing programs in the country, according to U.S. News and World Report. Nursing graduates work at many of the regional hospitals and contribute to Indiana’s role as a national leader in healthcare and medicine. The School of Nursing also partners closely with Community Health Network for learning opportunities and community treatment options, some available at the UIndy Health Pavilion.

UIndy Student Nurse Association board members put in many hours outside of the classroom to help with planning and facilitation of this conference. One board member, Kasandra Strunk, was elected to the Indiana Association of Student Nurses board and has been instrumental in planning the conference and promoting it among her peers.

“Opportunities like this help our students develop into future nursing leaders,” Toon said.

The conference will have large and small group opportunities for learning. Some sessions will relate directly to nursing school, such as a review for the national nursing licensure exam, general test taking tips, and stress management techniques. Other sessions will assist students in planning their future nursing careers, such as panel discussions with nurses in a variety of specialties and how to plan for graduate school.  

Learn more about the convention.

UIndy expands summer camp options

Camps like “Drone Mission Mania,” “Ultimate Obstacle Courses,” and “Superhero Missions” are just a few examples of the exciting new summer camps that will be available at the University of Indianapolis in Summer 2018.

Rachelle Merkel Diaz, director of summer programs, said the camps offered by the University stand out from other options across Indianapolis because they are devoted to specific activities, allowing kids to explore an interest at a deeper level.

“When I started working here a few years ago, I heard comments like ‘Oh, I had no idea there were summer camps here,’” Merkel Diaz said. “Now we’re changing the conversation to ‘what camps do you have this year?’”

The University will offer about 50 summer camp options in 2018, and registration is now available. Programs are geared toward kids ages six to eighteen and usually last four to five days.

More than 1,000 kids attended a summer camp at the University in 2017, and that number is expected to continue to grow.

“We’re also seeing students return for multiple sessions. It’s nice to see them come back, because it tells us they’re really enjoying the experiences,” she added.

Merkel Diaz said summer programs are important for the University because they help the community become more familiar and more engaged with the campus. Additionally, a busy campus all year long helps to support retail businesses in the neighborhood.

“By expanding what we’re doing in the summer, we’re building relationships with students early on,” she said. “Hopefully they want to come back again, not just in the summer, but as future students.”

Beyond 2018, the vision is to continue growing University offerings to include more science and arts camps and to expand the interest areas to draw in a wider range of participants, Merkel Diaz said.

“We would like to continue broadening partnerships with community schools and organizations to re-engage the south side and promote the University as a resource hub for unique and interesting events all year long,” she added.

 

New opportunities in 2018 include:

  • An engineering camp will introduce campers to hands-on experience with designing, building and racing their own radio-controlled cars. Students in grades 9 – 12 will work on the project using computer-aided designs, 3D printing and laser cutting technology. 
  • A variety of drone-themed camps. The University is partnering with Drobots instructors, who will lead a variety of day camps for kids in grades 3 – 5 and grades 6 – 8 who are interested in learning to fly drones. Find details about drone camps here.
  • Overnight team camps for high school soccer, women’s basketball and men’s basketball players. Teams will have the opportunity to stay overnight in the residence halls for several days, be mentored by college athletes and get feedback from University coaches.
  • A camp for high school students interested in learning about the field of physical therapy. The program will be hosted by MICI-AHEC on the University’s campus and include several field trips. See camp details.

 

Returning favorites in 2018 include:

  • Grand Camp, a camp with cross-generational activities for grandparents and grandkids to enjoy together. Learn more.
  • Theatre camp “From Story to Stage,” which allows campers to get hands-on experience with playwriting, acting, costume design and more.
  • The 24th annual Piano Camp, designed for beginners and intermediate students age 7 – 12. The weeklong day camp ends with a recital in Ruth Lilly Performance Hall for family and friends to enjoy.
  • STEM camps like Math Beyond Numbers (for grades 6 – 8) and Radical Robotics, a partnership with Center Grove High School that allows their robotics club to host on-campus activities that are open to the general public. 

 

See a complete list of 2018 summer camp options.

Journalism students address community issue through Indy Star partnership

starinvestigative_story

A unique partnership between the University of Indianapolis and the Indianapolis Star provided journalism students with valuable hands-on experience in the field–and the opportunity for a byline in Indiana’s newspaper of record.

Students in the Investigative Reporting course published a story in the Indy Star that shed light on how the City of Indianapolis Mayor’s Action Center handles complaints. The months-long investigation, published in December 2017, examined data from the Mayor’s Action Center and found, for example, that poorer neighborhoods wait longer for pothole fixes.

Jeanne Criswell, associate professor and director of the Department of Communication’s journalism program, taught the course, which brought together 14 students to work with the Indianapolis Star’s Alvie Lindsay, news and investigations director, and Tim Evans, investigative reporter and consumer advocate. Criswell said the Indy Star journalists served as role models, mentors and editors as students applied their skills in information gathering, verification and analysis and publication.

“The Indianapolis Star partnership and the expectations of its dedicated journalists gave the students an invaluable, project-based professional experience and inspired them to produce some insightful investigative reporting,” Criswell said.

Read the investigative story here.

The students who contributed were Zoë Berg (Reflector editor-in-chief), Erik Cliburn (Reflector managing editor), Tyler Conrad, Laken Detweiler, Chelsea Faulk, Kaley Gatto, Tanner Gurin, Anthony Lain, Emily Mills (WICR operations manager), Elisha Sellars, Skylar Sigman, Kieffer Simpson, Dallas Thacker and Ryan Wright-Jordan.

The University’s Department of Communication has enjoyed a long history of experiential learning with the Indianapolis Star, including guest lectures and hosting students for on-site visits.

Publication wasn’t guaranteed, Criswell noted. The course was designed to allow students to collaborate with the Indy Star journalists on the project and only “if the resulting work merited, to publish that content both in print and online.”

Meeting the expectations for publication was a clear goal for the students, who praised the department for offering real-life experience and the opportunity to work with professional journalists.

“Working with the Indianapolis Star, I wanted to do my best in order to make my work worth being in the paper. Now, after looking at the printed and online version of our story, it makes me feel accomplished as a student and proud to have had this opportunity,” said Kaley Gatto, ’18 (communication major, experience design minor), who handled still photography for the project.

Dallas Thacker, ’17 (communication), created a graphic that accompanied the story. He came to appreciate how much effort goes into an investigative reporting project.

“The idea to have this type of class where you work directly with professionals in the career paths that we’re looking to pursue is absolutely outstanding,” Thacker said.

Criswell said the department consistently collaborates with a wide variety of news organizations for internships, guest lectures, consultations and judging. Faculty also work with the news media on a regular basis in their roles with various journalism organizations such as the Indiana Collegiate Press Association, Indiana Association of School Broadcasters, Society of Professional Journalists and others.

 

IndyGo to Host Red Line Transit Discussion on Campus

IndyGo will host a Transit Talk open house at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 30 on the University of Indianapolis campus to answer questions and give updates about the Red Line rapid transit project and other upcoming improvements.

A Red Line station is expected to open in 2019 near the University campus along Shelby Street, just north of Hanna Avenue.It will be one of 28 stops along the initial 13-mile route. Electric-powered, wifi-equipped buses will pick up passengers every 10 minutes, from 5 a.m. to 1 a.m., every day of the year.

Construction of the IndyGo’s Red Line also was a key improvement recommended from an intense neighborhood study conducted as part  of the South Indy Quality of Life Plan. The University has been one of the anchor organizations supporting these efforts.

scavenger-46

Having the Red Line on campus will support neighborhood growth and better connect students to downtown activities and additional networking opportunities. The University is a major employer on the south side and hosts more than 200 cultural attractions and events each year. In addition to providing more access to campus, the Red Line also will help students and residents in the area connect to downtown and other destination points across the city.

Traffic impacts on the south side are expected to be minimal, according to the IndyGo website.

IndyGo Transit Talk
6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 30
Schwitzer Student Center, University of Indianapolis
1400 E. Hanna Ave.

The Jan. 30 event is one of nine upcoming Transit Talks that will be hosted around the city of Indianapolis in early 2018, around the same time that Red Line construction will begin.

See the full list of upcoming Transit Talks.

 

Exhibition of women illustrators reveals limitless possibilities in a growing field

From digital animation to traditional illustrated media, a new exhibition at the University of Indianapolis celebrates the work of female artists from around the globe who make their living as illustrators.

“Illustration: Women Making A Mark” is an invitational exhibition of contemporary, award-winning illustrators that examines the practice of traditional and digital illustration across various genres, including editorial, publishing, advertising and merchandising. The exhibition, which is co-sponsored by Talbot Street Art Fair, runs from Jan. 16 through Feb. 9 in the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center gallery, with an opening reception from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. on Jan. 22, followed by an Artist Talk with animator/filmmaker Jordan Bruner.

Randi Frye, assistant professor of art & design, curated the exhibition with the goal of creating an eye-opening experience for viewers. The featured artists boast an extensive client list, including news outlets such as The New York Times, Vanity Fair, and The Washington Post and book publishers like Harper Collins, Random House and Houghton Mifflin.

“The field of illustration has historically been a predominantly male-dominated field. However, many of these women included in the exhibition have decades of experience as prominent illustrators and have forged the way as leaders and mentors for the emerging artists who are part of the exhibition,” Frye said.

The exhibition also highlights the Department of Art & Design’s newest concentration within the studio art degree, animation/illustration, as it demonstrates the exciting possibilities for students who wish to blend their love for figurative art and storytelling.

“Animation and illustration are used to visually enhance narratives, which can range from advertising campaigns to graphic novels to animated films. With these possibilities in mind, the newest concentration offers our students the opportunity to leverage traditional and/or digital media and apply it to a broad range of genres and career possibilities,” Frye said.

The exhibition will feature animation reels, hand-painted art and mixed media from more than a dozen international artists from the United States, Italy and Canada, who range from emerging illustrators to women with decades of experience.

A discussion with artist Jordan Bruner will follow the reception, beginning at approximately 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 22 (Room 115, Christel DeHaan Fine Art Center). Bruner, an Emmy Award nominee based in New York, is a filmmaker and animator who has created music videos, commercials for Paul McCartney and Google, and animation for the documentary Waiting for Superman.

Prints will be available for purchase at the Jan. 22 reception.

See the full artist listing here.

 

From engineer to STEM teacher: Program sparks career transformation

Jas'Minique Potter

Jas’Minique Potter ’18

Jas’Minique Potter ’18, a student in the University of Indianapolis Teach (STEM)³ Program, discusses the built-in mentorship, preparation and support that foster an exciting career change from engineering to teaching.

Jas’Minique (Jazz) Potter ’18 (MAT) is always amazed when she asks students what they think engineers do.

“A lot of people think I get my hands dirty or I’m working with a train – things they learned from watching television shows. But it’s so much more than that,” Potter said. “There’s engineering in everything – even in the chair you’re sitting in.”

As an engineer for Rolls-Royce Corp. in Indianapolis, Potter designed structural components for aircraft engines. Now she is translating that knowledge and field experience to her dream career of teaching STEM to high school students through the University of Indianapolis Teach (STEM)³ Program.

Her goal is to prepare students for the workforce of the future.

“It’s about getting students to think about how technology impacts the world and the jobs they’ll have when they’re older,” Potter said.

The Teach (STEM)³ Program, funded through the National Science Foundation Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, focuses on preparing secondary-level (middle/high school) STEM educators. The program meets a growing local and national need by bringing professionals from STEM-related fields to pursue a teaching career.

Potter joined the program in 2017 after working for several years as a design engineer at Rolls-Royce, a leading industry supplier for aircraft engines and other industries. She will graduate in 2018 with a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT). The Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program includes a stipend which allows candidates to complete the intensive, one-year program without undue financial hardship. Candidates must commit to serve as middle or high school STEM teachers after graduation.

“I felt like this program was a perfect combination of things to help me get to my dream to become an educator. I was trying to find the time to transition into the education field and really pursue my passion,” Potter said.

The University’s Teach (STEM)³ program is designed for career changers who have a STEM-related degree coupled with a passion for pursuing a teaching career. The program includes a clinical residency, a unique graduate experience that offers candidates the opportunity to partner with a master teacher in a classroom throughout an entire school year while simultaneously completing their coursework to obtain the MAT and teaching license. Potter is teaching a geometry course to sophomores at Ben Davis High School in Indianapolis for her residency.

“One of the things that stuck out to me about the program was that it was a one-year program that would get me the experience in the field prior to graduating and offered a stipend to fund my tuition,” Potter said.

With a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and professional experience at Rolls-Royce, Potter is excited to apply her skills and knowledge in the classroom. Teach (STEM)³ allows her to do that immediately.

“The residency portion of this program has further reinforced my decision in choosing this program because I’m technically doing my first year of teaching with the support and feedback of mentors, professors, fellow teachers at Ben Davis and even fellow Scholars who are in the program with me,” Potter said. “I literally get to take things I learn in class and directly apply them in the classroom and get feedback on the application.”

That experience is a key component of the program.

As a career changer entering the teaching profession, Jazz brings a wealth of practical knowledge she will be able to use to engage students in real-world math experiences as she designs engaging lessons,” added Deb Sachs, Teach (STEM)³ Program director and assistant professor.

“I’ve learned so much in the program about how to get my students engaged and involved,” Potter said, noting that her coursework and the clinical residency focus on addressing the needs of students from different backgrounds who have a variety of learning preferences. “Through the clinical residency, this program allows me to learn how to be an effective educator.”

Jas'Minique Potter with Dr. Frankie Cooper

Jas’Minique Potter with Dr. Frankie Cooper

Potter was one of four students from across the state to receive a scholarship by the Indianapolis Alliance of Black School Educators at the 10th Annual IABSE Education Forum. Her scholarship was named in honor of Dr. Frankie Cooper, former IABSE president, whom she had the honor of meeting at the forum.

Before discovering the Teach (STEM)³ Program, Potter said she was “honestly scared to just take that leap of faith and go after my dreams and my passion.” Now that she is running at full steam through the program? “It was just amazing to see doors open when you take that leap of faith.”

Written by Sara Galer, Senior Communications Specialist, University of Indianapolis. Contact newsdesk@uindy.edu with your campus news.

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