Artist-in-Residence Drew Petersen creates unique learning opportunities for piano students

Drew Petersen master piano class - February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Drew Petersen master piano class – February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

INDIANAPOLIS – Music students at the University of Indianapolis are reaping the benefits of a new artist-in-residence program that connects them with unique learning experiences and a global professional network.

Drew Petersen, 2017 American Pianists Awards winner, Christel DeHaan fellow and University of Indianapolis artist-in-residence, has held masterclasses, private coachings, lectures and performances as part of the partnership between the American Pianists Association and the University.

Petersen returns this week to offer another masterclass for students and the community on Wednesday, Feb. 14, followed by a solo repertoire and concerto collaboration with the University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra on Friday, Feb. 16 (sponsored by Katz, Sapper & Miller. Register here.)

These experiences have the power to inspire students in ways that can serve as a catalyst for significant growth in their musicianship and career aspirations,” said Brenda Clark, Department of Music chair.

Learn more about the University of Indianapolis Department of Music programs.

Drew Petersen master piano class with UIndy students at CDFAC on the Ruth Lilly Perfomance Hall stage on Wednesday, February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

The public is invited to observe Petersen’s next masterclass, scheduled from 5-7 p.m. on Wednesday at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center (Ruth Lilly Performance Hall). No registration is required.

A cum laude graduate of Harvard University in social sciences, Petersen pursued undergraduate and graduate studies in music at the Juilliard School. He also has been a prizewinner in major international competitions and has been profiled in the New York Times, New York Magazine and the documentary Just Normal.

Petersen said interacting with the talented music students on campus has been one of the biggest rewards of his new connection to the University.

“Whenever I interact with the students and faculty, I am reminded that each day at UIndy is an opportunity to explore great music together and examine and innovate the best ways we can share it with the community. I’ve been having a great time, and I look forward to all that lies ahead,” Petersen said.

Drew Petersen master piano class with UIndy students at CDFAC on the Ruth Lilly Perfomance Hall stage on Wednesday, February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Students also have enjoyed Petersen’s mentorship. During her masterclass with Petersen, Carrie Atkinson ’18 (music – piano) was inspired by his remarkable playing technique and personable approach.

“Drew brought an excitement to the music that was inspiring to see as well as some wonderful insights to the music that reinforced what my teachers had already been instructing me in,” Atkinson said.

Richard Ratliff, professor of music, said Petersen’s fall 2017 performance on campus demonstrated the kind of grace under pressure that he encourages in his students.

“After our week with Drew, students approached the remainder of the semester with energy and enthusiasm. Students now realize that such mastery is a step-by-step process,” Ratliff explained.

Cole Snapp ’18 (music – piano, composition concentration) had a private lesson and a masterclass with Petersen and found both experiences to be motivational.

“Having an amazingly proficient pianist like Drew coach me was extremely valuable. He was able to bring things to my attention that I would not have otherwise thought. In a Zoltan Kodàly piece I was working on, he asked me to play the climactic section louder and louder until I was literally throwing my whole weight into the keys,” Snapp said.

“Since Drew is not much older than our students, his command in public presentation really made an impact. His expertise in a wide variety of repertoire — from the 18th century to the present — was apparent to everyone as he worked with students and spoke insightfully about the music he performs and is planning to record,” Ratliff said.

Atkinson said she’s grateful for the partnership between the APA and the University.

“I think that it is so enriching to get to work with musicians of his calibre. Drew is one of the top pianists on the scene right now, and getting to work with him was a very valuable and fresh experience. The best part, for me, was seeing how excited he got about the music,” she said.

Written by Sara Galer, Senior Communications Specialist, University of Indianapolis. Contact newsdesk@uindy.edu with your campus news.

Olympic connections abound at the University of Indianapolis

The University of Indianapolis celebrates Olympic connections as the 2018 Games get underway in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Here’s a look at UIndy Olympians past and present.

Sotia Neophytou

Sotia Neophytou

Sotia Neophytou ’20 (business management) is a member of the women’s swim team and an Olympian who competed in the 2016 Rio Summer Games. She was the only female Cypriot to represent her country, swimming 1:02.83 in her heat for the 100 butterfly.

Dalton Herendeen ’15 competed for Team USA Paralympics men’s swimming in the London Games in 2012 and in Rio 2016 (achieving fourth overall in Rio).

Photo shows Olympian Dick Nalley, who competed in the 1980 Lake Placid Games.

Photo shows Olympian Dick Nalley, who competed in the 1980 Lake Placid Games.

Dick Nalley ’77, a football and track standout for the Greyhounds in the 1970s, competed in the 1980 Winter Games in Lake Placid, finishing fifth overall in the two-man bobsled. Nalley, who became a firefighter with the Indianapolis Fire Department, won the bench press gold medal at the Calgary World Police and Fire Games and the silver medal at the Sweden World Police and Fire Games. He was also eight-time Indiana State Bench Press champion. He passed away in 2002.

Randy Heisler 86, finished 17th in the discus in the 1988 Summer Games in Seoul, South Korea. Heisler was a track and field letter winner from 1981 through 1984, a three-time NCAA Division II National Champion and All-American from 1982 to 1984 and an NCAA Division II record holder. He was honored as University of Indianapolis Outstanding Male Athlete in 1984 and represented the United States 13 times in international competitions. He was one of the top throwers in the country for many years in the 1980s and 1990s, including the U.S. World Championship team in 1987.

Orel Oral

Orel Oral

Orel Oral ’04 represented his native Turkey in the 2000 and 2004 Summer Games, swimming in the 200-meter individual medley. Oral was a seven-time national champion for the Greyhounds in the early aughts. He is a seven-time NCAA Division II national champion and was named Swimmer of the Year in Turkey in 2003 and 2004.

Matt Royer ‘11, Greyhound throws coach, qualified for the 2012 U.S. Olympics Trials in the hammer throw, but did not make it to the Olympics. He was a three-time All-American for the Greyhounds.

Ned Shannon, the Greyhounds’ head athletic trainer, works with the University’s 23 sports and as an instructor in the athletic training curriculum. He is an approved clinical instructor in the Athletic Training Education Department and the main athletic trainer for football and wrestling. Shannon has participated as a volunteer athletic trainer for the 2005 and 2006 USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships, 2001 World Fire and Police Games, 1998 USOC athletic trainer for the Goodwill Games in New York City, volunteer athletic trainer at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and in that same year participated as a staff athletic trainer at Games of the XXVI Olympiad in Atlanta, Georgia.

Local Rev. Rob Fuquay and Grammy-winning musician Bela Fleck to receive honorary degrees

The University of Indianapolis will present honorary degrees to two individuals who are connecting communities through their work and artistry during the institution’s May 5 Commencement ceremony:

Rev. Rob Fuquay

Rev. Rob Fuquay

Rev. Rob Fuquay, author and senior pastor of St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Indianapolis, and Béla Fleck, Grammy Award-winning banjo player and composer will be honored.

In addition to receiving degrees, Fuquay will present the keynote address to more than 1,400 graduates, and Fleck will perform a song on the banjo.

“Commencement is designed to celebrate and recognize the hard work at improving lives and enhancing communities,” said University President Robert L. Manuel. “Both of these recipients have spent their careers carving new paths and inspiring others with their craft.”

The University of Indianapolis has a rich history rooted in the United Methodist Church. Fuquay, head of the 6,000-member St. Luke’s Church — one of the largest in the denomination, is recognized as a rising thought leader in the church’s mission and vision to serve its many communities.

The Department of Music at the University of Indianapolis is recognized nationally for its world-class faculty and the talented students who compete for acceptance into the program. The University partners with local professional orchestras to provide a unique learning and performing environment in one of the top-rated facilities in the Midwest. Fleck credits many diverse influences and teachers for helping him to perform his music to audiences across the world.

“These honorary degree recipients reflect the University’s mission as a community-first institution that welcomes diverse thought and influences to advance its vision. We look forward to welcoming them to campus,” Manuel said.

Background

Rev. Fuquay, who has called Indianapolis home since 2011, formerly served as the senior pastor of Williamson’s Chapel United Methodist Church in Mooresville, NC. He is the fifth senior pastor appointed at St. Luke’s. As the author of several books and course guides on religious topics, Fuquay is considered a thought leader on innovative subjects designed to bring religion and inspiration to the entire community, not just his congregation. Throughout his career, Fuquay has served various congregations with his gifts of strong preaching, leadership development and visioning.

Béla Fleck (photo courtesy Jim McGuire)

Béla Fleck (photo courtesy Jim McGuire)

Béla Fleck, commonly described as the world’s best banjo player, has received 16 Grammy Awards, music’s top honor — and has been nominated in more Grammy categories than any other musician. He is best known for his eclectic musical pursuits and introducing the banjo to all genres of improvisational music.

He is lauded internationally as a solo artist as well as from his work with successful groups such as New Grass Revival and Bela Fleck and the Flecktones. Through collaborations with artists such as Sam Bush, Chick Corea, Branford Marsalis, Victor Wooten, Dave Matthews and many others, Fleck has reinvented the image and sound of the banjo.

Business students lead the way for Straight Answer Saturday Feb. 10

INDIANAPOLIS – The Student Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) at the University of Indianapolis is spearheading a community event designed to help Indianapolis residents with free legal and financial questions.

sasStraight Answer Saturday, held in the Schwitzer Student Center on the University of Indianapolis campus from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Feb. 10, 2018, is a free event that allows the general public to meet with attorneys and financial planners in one-on-one consultations. Professionals can answer questions about wills, power of attorney, saving for retirement, debt, taxes and more. Pre-register here.

The University has partnered with  the Indiana Secretary of State Connie Lawson’s Office, the Indiana State Bar Association and the Financial Planners Association of Greater Indiana to host the event. Representatives from the following agencies will also be available: Social Security Administration, Indiana Better Business Bureau, Indiana Legal Services, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, Senior Medicare Patrol, AARP, Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center, CollegeChoice 529 and Indiana Department of Child Services.

“No judgment. No sales pitches. Just straight answers. That’s our goal for Straight Answer Saturday,” said Lawson. “My office created this event to ensure the citizens of Indiana can get legal and financial help in a stress-free environment, free of charge.”

Alex Yurack

Alex Yurack

As project manager for Straight Answer Saturday, SBLA Vice President Alex Yurack ’20 (finance) has gained valuable professional skills. Yurack was responsible for room set-up, food, security, parking and managing a large group of freshman business students to volunteer at the event.

“SBLA has been great for me because I have matured and grown comfortable in a business environment. Learning how to conduct myself in a business professional while I am still in college is a great thing. It’s better to learn that now than to start once I have graduated,” Yurack said.

Learn more about UIndy School of Business programs.

Kelly Griese, senior investor education coordinator for the Indiana Secretary of State, said the University has provided much more than a venue for Straight Answer Saturday.

“The School of Business brings so much more to the table. SBLA members are young professionals, and their work is exceptional. I can’t say enough great things about UIndy’s support of Straight Answer Saturday and how professional and driven these students are,” Griese said.

Matt Will, professor of finance, acts as an advisor to the SBLA. He emphasized the benefits for students as they gain real-life experience in event planning and project management, as well as providing Indianapolis residents with access to free professional advice.

“We do this in part because it is education for service. It’s for the community around the university and all over the city. It’s also a great networking opportunity for our students to meet FPA or Bar Association members,” Will said.

Shelby Winner

Shelby Winner

Mentorship is a key part of the process, from faculty and industry professionals to fellow students. SBLA President Shelby Winner ’19 (accounting), ’20 (MBA) guided Yurack through the planning process. She appreciates the guidance she received from faculty.

“Dr. Will has been a great mentor through this program. He truly wants what is best for his students, and through SBLA he has given his students the opportunity to learn how to be successful through real-life experiences,” Winner said.

 

UIndy professor: 5 things to know about women’s heart health

anne_mejia_downs_0220Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, according to The Heart Foundation.

During Women’s Heart Week in February, Anne Mejia-Downs, associate professor with the University of Indianapolis Krannert School of Physical Therapy, shares five things to know about women’s heart health:

1. Women are usually more concerned about cancer, especially breast cancer. However, more women are affected by and die from heart disease than any kind of cancer. That’s why “Go Red For Women Day” is Feb 2nd – to remind women that heart disease is not just a man’s disease. In addition, many of the habits that will help to reduce your risk of heart disease also decrease the risk for cancer, so you get a “two for one.” Stop smoking, maintain a healthy weight, and get physically active to decrease your risk of both conditions.

2. African-American women have higher rates of heart disease and death from heart disease than Caucasian women do, so it’s especially important for these women to take steps to lower their risk.

3. Estrogen is thought to lower the risk of heart disease in women, so more men get heart disease at younger ages. But after menopause, women “catch up” to men, and even overtake them. In fact, more older women die of heart disease than men. At age 45, one out of nine women have heart disease, but at age 65, it increases greatly to one in three women.

4. The “typical signs of a heart attack” that are so often portrayed in the media (pain in the middle of the chest and pain radiating down the left arm) may not be typical for women. Women may feel breathlessness, stomach pain, exhaustion, and/or back pain. So don’t dismiss symptoms that make you feel something is wrong.

5. Many factors that increase the risk of heart disease are actually riskier for women than men, including smoking, diabetes, depression and anxiety, and low HDL (the healthy type of cholesterol).

University of Indianapolis announces 2018 Black History Month events

blackhistory17The University of Indianapolis celebrates Black History Month with a full calendar of events during February 2018, including a trivia night, an Open Mic Dialog and a formal dinner. Organized by the Black Student Association, events throughout the month are designed to increase awareness of the  achievements of African-Americans and their pivotal role in United States history.

A new addition this year to the robust line-up is the collaboration between BSA and the Office of Equity & Inclusion (OEI) for Feb. 15th’s Open Mic Dialog on healthy relationships. Plans are in the works to involve several student organizations in programming for that event, said Darin Sills ’19 (visual communication design), president of the Black Student Association.

“This is a great opportunity to partner with the Black Student Association and other student groups to spark conversation about what it means to be in a healthy relationship,” said Sean Huddleston, vice president of equity and inclusion. He noted the growing interest in OEI’s Open Mic Dialog sessions, which were launched in the fall of 2017.

Recording artist, TEDx and motivational speaker Shaun Boothe will be guest speaker at the Black History Month Dinner: “A Legacy of Excellence” on Feb. 28th. Boothe is the creator of the critically acclaimed “The Unauthorized Biography Series” which celebrates historical figures through biographical rap songs.

Sills encouraged the campus community to participate in Black History Month events regardless of ethnic background or identity.

“Events that we organize aren’t just for a strictly African-American audience. We want everyone to come to all events,” Sills said.

Schedule of events:

Jan. 31/Feb. 1: Stop by the BSA table in the Schwitzer Student Center to answer Black History Month trivia questions and pick up a sweet treat!

Feb. 2: Celebrating Black History Month: Heroes
6:00 – 8:00 p.m., Garfield Park Arts Center

Feb. 5: David Otunga (Diversity Lecture Series)
9:00 p.m., UIndy Hall

Feb. 7: BSA general body meeting
9:00 p.m., UIndy Hall A

Feb. 8: Praise and worship
9:00 p.m., The Chapel

Feb. 14: Anti-Valentine’s Day
9:00 p.m., Trustees Room

Feb. 15: Love and Hip Hop UIndy (open mic dialog with Office of Equity & Inclusion)
9:00 p.m., UIndy Hall A

Feb. 21: Black History trivia
9:00 p.m. Shreve Atrium, Student Engagement Center

Feb. 24: Black Panther film screening
Location to be announced

Feb. 27: Neil Holborn – Spoken word artist
9:00 p.m., UIndy Hall A

Feb. 28: Black History Month Dinner: “A Legacy of Excellence” with speaker Shaun Boothe
7:00 p.m., UIndy Hall A

 

Indiana legislature honors undefeated Greyhounds Football team

The University of Indianapolis Greyhounds Football team was honored on the floor of the Indiana Statehouse on Thursday, celebrating an undefeated and record-breaking regular season.

Fans across the city and region got behind the Greyhounds in 2017 as they pursued a perfect 11-0 regular season. Despite a loss in the first round of the playoffs to Harding University, the program’s success — as well as that of other sports in 2017– helped to solidify University of Indianapolis athletics as one of the elite programs in Division II.

“Our athletics programs continue to succeed because our coaches, staff and the families of our student athletes create an exceptional environment for students to excel, both on and off the field. This undefeated season is another chapter in the growth of our athletic programs and the excitement they add to the UIndy campus experience,” said University President Robert Manuel.

Student athletes at the University earned a cumulative GPA of 3.26 last semester–a testament to how hard they work to achieve athletic and academic goals, Manuel added.

Indiana Rep. Jack Sandlin (R-Indianapolis) ‘78, ‘94 facilitated the recognition Thursday by the Indiana Legislature. Representing the football team were captains Jake Purichia, Andrew Walker, Aeneas White and Ruben Holcomb, along with coaches and athletics administrators.

“Coming downtown and being in this building to get recognized was special,” Purichia said. “I’m proud of our coaches, staff and players for what we’ve accomplished.”

“It was a huge honor getting recognized for the great season we had,” Holcomb added. “It was my last season so going out in such a successful way means a lot.”

The 2017 season was the first undefeated regular season since 1953. The team also set new records for the most wins in a season (11), consecutive wins (15) and scoring offense (38.2 ppg). The Greyhounds matched team and Great Lakes Valley Conference marks for fewest interceptions thrown (4) and garnered a conference record 14 GLVC Player of the Week awards, while leading the nation in the fewest sacks allowed (0.5 per game).

The Hounds spent a total of eight consecutive weeks in the Top 10, peaking at a program high No. 5 as they went on to capture their fifth GLVC title in six years.

The football success was just one of many accolades enjoyed by UIndy sports teams in 2017. Greyhounds earned the sixth consecutive GLVC All-Sports Trophy, presented annually to the university demonstrating the best all around performance in the league’s 20 sponsored sports. Other team achievements in 2017 include:

  • Men’s soccer were named GLVC Conference Champions.
  • Women’s Golf broke individual, team and conference records on the way to earning the fourth-consecutive top-five finish in the NCAA tournament.
  • Women’s tennis student-athletes Hanna Volikova and Alina Kislitskaya won the first ITA national doubles championship in program history.
  • Men’s and Women’s Diving currently are ranked in the Top 10 in Division II programs.
  • 253 Greyhound student-athletes were named to the GLVC All-Academic team.

“Our athletics success continues to produce benefits in recruitment and retention of students,” said Sue Willey, vice president for Intercollegiate Athletics at the University. “Being honored at the statehouse raises the profile of the team and the University as a whole. It’s a great honor and another positive development for the program that will motivate our student athletes and teams to continue their success.

Football Coach Bob Bartolomeo, who brought back 17 seniors this year, said the undefeated season was special because it has happened only twice since the program began.

“When you look at all the divisions and schools playing college football, it’s extremely difficult and takes a lot of work and effort to accomplish an undefeated season. That’s something we’re quite proud of,” said Bartolomeo, who also was named GLVC Coach of the Year.

Willey said she is excited about the future of the programs and their impact on the growth of the University.

Undergrad research experience prepares Honors College students for IU School of Medicine

Two seniors from the Ron & Laura Strain Honors College will pursue medical degrees at the Indiana University School of Medicine in fall 2018. Lauren Bryant ’18 (biology and psychology) plans to focus on child and adolescent psychiatry, and Casey Wendorff ’18 (biology major, chemistry minor, pre-med concentration) will concentrate on sports medicine, specializing in the knee, foot and ankle.

Bryant and Wendorff recently presented research posters at the National Collegiate Honors Council conference in Atlanta, Georgia. Both students point to unique research opportunities gained by participating in Honors College that set the stage for their success.

“Honors College challenges you and sets you apart from other students because it shows that you are not afraid to push yourself to the next level,” Wendorff said.

“The competition is fierce for those coveted post-graduate positions at medical, vet, and graduate schools,” said Kevin Gribbins, assistant professor of biology and Honors project advisor to both students. Gribbins said UIndy’s emphasis on pre-professional training and research launched Bryant and Wendorff to the top of the list at the institutions they applied to.

Bryant appreciated Gribbins’ focus on showing students how to use their academic research as leverage during the medical school application process.

“He talked to me about how I can market that wherever I choose to go,” she said.

Lauren Bryant and Casey Wendorff took part in a study abroad trip to the Galapagos Islands.

Lauren Bryant and Casey Wendorff took part in a study abroad trip to Ecuador and the Galapagos Islands with Profs. Gribbins and Stemke.

As the number of student applications rise for medical and graduate schools, Gribbins said institutions look for experiences that set applicants apart. UIndy’s Department of Biology, in tandem with Honors College, provides a way for students like Bryant and Wendorff to distinguish themselves through a graduate school-caliber research program for undergraduates.

“Lauren and Casey are great examples of that work. They not only have the grades and the MCAT scores but they have research credentials and peer-reviewed publications that make them stand out among other applicants for medical school,” Gribbins said.

Both students highlighted the opportunities they had at UIndy to develop and highlight the skills they will apply during their medical careers.

“My undergrad work provided me with the critical foundation of the principles, techniques and trends that I will learn and apply in medical school,” Wendorff said. “Also, the knowledge and applications that I learned through classes in chemistry, physics, psychology and biology set me up to perform exceptionally well on the MCAT, which was key in being admitted to medical school.”

Bryant appreciates the atmosphere of healthy competition that offers students the chance to excel. “All of the professors are very much into showcasing all of our researchers,” Bryant said.

Personalized mentorship formed a key aspect of the UIndy experience for Bryant and Wendorff. In addition to research opportunities and academic support throughout their undergraduate studies, those relationships led to letters of recommendation crucial to the application process.

Dr. Gribbins was very instrumental in helping me achieve my goals as he worked with me during research,” said Wendorff, who received an athletic scholarship during his senior year for cross country and track.

“My coaches, Kathy Casey and Brad Robinson, both instilled a hard work ethic in me,” he added.

“When I hit a snag, I always had a professor or advisor, someone reaching out their hand. I didn’t even have to go find them. Someone was already saying if you need me, here’s how to find me,” Bryant said.

Doug Stemke, associate professor of biology and Bryant’s pre-med advisor, was another mentor.

Lauren is the type of person you want your physician to be. She is bright, always well-prepared, friendly, communicates well and leaves no stone unturned. She’s always improving herself,” Stemke said.

Just as students benefit from UIndy’s teacher-student ratio, faculty take pride in student accomplishments.

“The greatest part for me is the opportunity to work with such amazing students in an atmosphere where we get to know our students as more than students, and we can advise them more closely to make sure they reach their very best as an undergraduate and that they have every opportunity to succeed once they leave UIndy. I think that is what we do very well in the biology department at UIndy!” Gribbins said.

University hosts 50th annual regional theatre festival

About 1,400 theatre enthusiasts from Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and Wisconsin gathered at the University of Indianapolis recently for the 50th annual Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF).

The Department of Theatre hosted the week-long festival for Region III in January 2018. It was one of eight regional events across the country.

The festival included theatrical performances, workshops, scholarship competitions for acting, design and stage management students, along with professional networking opportunities.

“It’s a lot of fun to be immersed in theatre for a week,” said Penny Sornberger, associate professor of costume design. “It opens up opportunities for our students to meet fellow students from other schools, form new bonds, network with professionals in the field and get feedback on their work.”

About 30 University theatre students volunteered for and competed in the festival. *See a complete list of student competitors below.

Notable achievements included:

  • Carly Wagers ‘20 was a semifinalist in the Regional Design Projects Competition, ranking in the top 10 percent of 200 entries.
  • Zech Saenz ’19 won the Design Storm Competition for directing “The Most Wretched Deathbed Fever Dreams of Edgar Allan Poe.”
  • Daisy Grey ‘19 (director) and Jade Lynch ‘19 (sound design) were runners-up for their work on “La Boheme.”

Six theatre faculty members were instrumental in organizing activities: Penny Sornberger, Brad Wright, James Leagre, Casey Kearns, Christian McKinney and Jodi Bush.

During the festival, University Production Manager Christian McKinney received the Region III Faculty Service Award. Peers throughout Region III voted, selecting McKinney as the winner for her expertise in planning the event.

“It’s great to be recognized for all the hard work that went into this festival,” McKinney said. “The reason we do this is for the students. The experiences they gain and the contacts they make at this festival will help them far beyond their time here at UIndy.”  

Festival organizers persevered despite severe winter weather that threatened to interrupt scheduled events.

“We feel the festival was very successful, even with all the weather issues,” Sornberger said. “The show must go on. We’re theatre folks; that’s what we do!”

 

Congratulations to all University theatre students who competed:

 

Irene Ryan Scholarship Auditions:  

     Stephen Cox ‘18 & partner Carly Wagers ’20

     Mary Schreier ‘19 & partner Thomas Tutsie ’20

     Katie Carter ’20 & partner Clayton Rardon ’21

     Zech Saenz ’19 & partner Kelly Casey ’19

 

National KCACTF Awards for Theatrical Design Excellence Competition   

    Jade Lynch ‘19;  Sound Design for “Frankenstein”

 

National KCACTF Allied Design and Technology Award Competition

     Liesel Schmitz ‘20;  Creature Arm design for “Frankenstein”

     Pat Kizer ‘19;  Special Effects Makeup for “Frankenstein”

 

10-minute Play Festival

     Stephen Cox ‘18 Director; “Little Debbie”

 

Regional Design Projects Competition

     Emily Hart ‘19;  Costume Designs; “Eurydice”

     Carly Wagers ‘20; Costume Designs; “La Boheme”

 

Design Storm Competition

     Pat Kizer ’19; Make up Designer; “Eurydice”

     Kristine Storms ‘18; Costume Designs; “His Dark Materials”

     Daisy Grey ‘19; Director; “La Boheme”

     Jade Lynch ‘19; Sound Design; “La Boheme”

     Elizabeth Hollbrook ’18; Director; “Henry V”

     Emma Rund ‘20 ; Dramaturgy; “Henry V”

     Emily Hart ’19; Costume Designs; “Henry V”

     Zech Saenz ’19; Director; “The Most Wretched Deathbed Fever Dreams of Edgar Allan Poe”

University of Indianapolis launches leadership program for high school sophomores

INDIANAPOLIS – The University of Indianapolis is launching a leadership development program for Indiana high school sophomores next month with a statewide discussion that will bring together more than 275 high school sophomores from around the region with interests in technology, business, environment and sports.

The event, “Embracing the Future,” hosted by University of Indianapolis Visiting Fellow and former Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard, will promote leadership skills by encouraging students to embrace change in a positive way; and is one of series of initiatives throughout the year designed to prepare the next generation of Indiana’s leaders. Students who attend will have been nominated by their high schools.

“Learning to deal with change and not being afraid of failure are essential leadership qualities that are crucial to successful careers and lives,” Ballard said. “This event is designed to raise awareness of these issues as students consider potential careers and the impact they want to have on the world.”

The sessions focus on influential leaders from a variety of local industries. Topics include the “Future of Sports,” “Innovation,” “Fail Fest: Celebrating Failure’s Role in Innovation” and “Oil and National Security.”

In addition to “Embracing the Future,” University initiatives such as the Lugar Academy encourage high school students to pursue skills in leadership and service. Retired Sen. Richard Lugar, who has hosted the Richard G. Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow’s Leaders on campus for more than 40 years, works with students to identify the most pressing current events and political issues of our time.

Ballard, the former two-term Republican mayor of Indianapolis,  now serves as a Visiting Fellow for the Institute for Civic Leadership and Mayoral Archives at the University of Indianapolis. He mentors students and creates programming to help them develop leadership and civic management skills.

The goal of the Institute is to connect the community with Indianapolis’ civic history by working closely with previous mayors and their staffs to collect and preserve photos, documents and other resources that were critical in establishing Indianapolis as a world-class city. The Mayoral Archives are available digitally at uindy.historyit.com. The Institute hosts the annual Richard M. Fairbanks Symposium on Civic Leadership each year at the University, at which civic leaders and community builders examine a topic important to the future growth of the city.

Nomination details

Teachers and administrators are encouraged to nominate three outstanding sophomore students from their respective high schools who have an interest in technology, business, sports or the environment. Click here to submit nominations. All successful nominees will be contacted in February.

Ballard will deliver a keynote address, and students may choose to attend two afternoon sessions that touch on topics important to their personal and professional futures. The “Embracing the Future” event will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. , Saturday, March 3, in the Ransburg Auditorium of Esch Hall, 1400 E. Hanna Ave.

Learn more about the event.

imc_17_ballardsummit

 

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