Hullabaloo 2020 celebrates four years of on-campus letterpress printing

Hullabaloo 2020 logo

Hullabaloo 2020 logo

Reception for invitational exhibit features studio open house, gallery reception, guest artist lecture

The Hullabaloo Press at the University of Indianapolis is celebrating its four-year anniversary with an exhibition of contemporary letterpress printers and bookmakers, January 21 through February 7 at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center Gallery. An opening reception on Monday, January 27 will feature:

  • Print Shop Open House, 3-5 pm. Make your own print and see presses running.
  • Gallery Reception, 4-6 pm. Featuring “New Impressions,” an international juried exhibition, letterpress prints with Indiana connections and UIndy originals
  • Artist Lecture, 6:15 pm with Stephanie Carpenter from the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum, the world’s largest collection of wood type

Printers from around the United States were invited to display a collection of their letterpress work. Exhibitors were selected for their Indiana connections, preservation of historical practices, contemporary innovations, or unique practices we wish to showcase on campus, explained event organizer Katherine Fries, assistant professor in the Department of Art & Design.

Fries said she hopes the exhibit and reception will build awareness about the printmaking studio at the University of Indianapolis and that “letterpress is for everyone.” Any enrolled student can take a letterpress class to satisfy fine arts applied credits, she added.

This free, non-ticketed event is open to the public. Learn more about Hullabaloo 2020.

 

Crowd packs the house for Letterpress Hullabaloo

A standing-room only crowd turned out Monday evening at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center for the opening reception of “Letterpress Hullabaloo,” a celebration of the history and modern expression of printmaking.

Letterpress Hullabaloo is an invitational exhibition of contemporary printers and bookmakers that examines the continuing practice and historical context of letterpress, the original technique of printing with an inked, raised surface. Printers from around the United States were selected for this exhibition based on their Indianapolis connections, preservation of historical practices, contemporary innovations and/or unique experiences or techniques. The opening reception with hands-on exhibits and a presentation/lecture by Erin Beckloff, Co-Director of "Pressing On: The Letterpress Film" on on January 23, 2017. (Photo by D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Letterpress Hullabaloo  (Photo by D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Curious visitors had a chance to try their hand at printmaking and assist in the traditional craft of bookbinding. Letterpress fans strolled through the gallery to chat with Indiana-based printmakers and peruse colorful posters. It was all to celebrate an antiquated technology that has newfound meaning in the digital age.

Erin Beckloff, an assistant professor in graphic design at Miami University of Ohio who directed and produced the documentary “Pressing On: The Letterpress Film,” spoke to a capacity audience about how the passion of a small but dedicated community is keeping the art, design and craft of letterpress alive. Some significant figures in the letterpress community operate right here in Indiana.
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University of Indianapolis Etchings Press announces 2020 Whirling Prize recipients

Etchings Press, the University of Indianapolis student-run publisher, has announced the recipients of the 2020 Whirling Prize.

The Whirling Prize welcomes submissions of published books related to specific themes that change annually. The 2020 prize focused on the theme of horror.

Laurel Radzieski

Laurel Radzieski

Laurel Radzieski was awarded the 2020 Whirling Prize in Poetry for her collection “Red Mother” (NYQ Books).

Joseph P. Laycock was awarded the 2020 Whirling Prize in Prose

Joseph Laycock (photo: Dan Addison)

Joseph Laycock (photo: Dan Addison)

for his book, The Penguin Book of Exorcisms” (Penguin Classics).

Author and cover photos available for download here.

Student judges would like to honor the following finalists in the 2020 contest:

  • “Enantiodromia” by Mike X Welch
  • “Lake County Incidents” by Alec Cizak
  • “Homesick” by Nino Cipri

Students enrolled in ENGL 479 reviewed submissions and selected winners in the categories of prose and poetry.

“The student judges explored and engaged with Horror this fall and ended the competition with a greater appreciation of the nuances of the genre, after having the opportunity to read the contest entries. It was an excellent learning experience,” said Liz Whiteacre, advisor of the 2020 Whirling Prize.

The winners will receive a $500 honorarium and broadsides celebrating their book designed by a Hullabaloo Press artist. They will each join student judges in conversation on episodes of the UIndy Potluck Podcast. For updates, follow @uindyetchings on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

About “Red Mother”
In “Red Mother,” Laurel Radzieski weaves a love story told from the perspective of a parasite. This series of short poems explores the intimacy, desire and devotion we all experience by following the sometimes tender, often distressing relationship that emerges between a parasite and its host. Radzieski’s poetry is playful, though often with sinister undertones. Far from romanticizing either role, “Red Mother” takes readers on a tour of their own innards, exposing the hooks and claws of all involved. Following the parasite’s life cycle, the book blurs the line between science and poetic license to create a fantastical romp not for the squeamish. Although parasites are not known as conversationalists, Radzieski’s guest has a lot to say.

About The Penguin Book of Exorcisms”
Believe it or not, fifty-seven percent of Americans believe in demonic possession. Spirit possession has been documented for thousands of years and across religions and cultures, even into our time. “The Penguin Book of Exorcisms,” edited by religious studies scholar Joseph P. Laycock, showcases a range of stories, beliefs and practices surrounding exorcism from across time, cultures and religions. Laycock’s exhaustive research incorporates scientific papers, letters and diary entries by the clergy, treatises by physicians and theologians, reports from missionaries and colonial officers, legal proceedings, and poetry and popular legends. The result is informative and entertaining, and proves that truth can indeed be scarier than fiction.

Call for 2021 entries
Student judges welcome recently published books of prose and poetry in response to the theme of nature published since January 2019. Students are employing a broad interpretation of these criteria in their reading and judging. The deadline for submissions is September 3, 2021. Details may be found on the Etchings website.

University of Indianapolis Etchings Press announces 2018 Whirling Prize recipients

Etchings Press, the University of Indianapolis student-run publisher, has announced the recipients of the 2018 Whirling Prize.

The Whirling Prize welcomes submissions of published books related to specific themes that change annually. The 2018 prize focused on the theme of disability.

Christine Stewart-Nunez

Christine Stewart-Nunez

Christine Stewart-Nunez was awarded the 2018 Whirling Prize in Poetry for her collection “Bluewords Greening.”

Mira T. Lee received the 2018 Whirling Prize in Prose for her novel “Everything Here Is Beautiful.”

Mira T. Lee

Mira T. Lee

University of Indianapolis Department of English students reviewed 38 submissions and selected winners in the categories of prose and poetry.

“The competition this year was intense, and I was impressed by the judges’ attention to each entry and their conversations about craft, intention, and disability,” said Liz Whiteacre, advisor of the 2018 Whirling Prize. “It is always a pleasure to see a team of thoughtful readers engage with the prize submissions, and the students did an outstanding job, growing both their critiquing skills and their understanding of disability literature.”

The winners will receive a $500 honorarium and 25 copies of a letterpress broadside designed by student artists of UIndy’s Hullabaloo Press. Posters will be available for purchase in March 2019. Winners and judges will record an episode for The Potluck Podcast: UIndy & the Arts, which will be available to listeners in March 2019. For updates, follow @uindyetchings on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.

Call for 2019 entries
The theme for the 2019 Whirling Prize will focus on issues central to space. Students are employing a broad interpretation of this criteria in their reading and judging and are especially interested in reading books with a focus on relationships with our universe. All writers focusing on related topics who have published their books since January 1, 2017, are welcome to participate. The deadline for submissions is September 2, 2019. Details may be found on the Etchings Press website.

Faculty and students collaborate to bring “Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne” back to print

When Jennifer Camden, professor and associate chair of English, assigned “The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne” to her class she didn’t realize the journey she was about to inadvertently embark on. “Students told me they couldn’t find the novel,” she said. “I had a copy of the last scholarly edition, from the 1990s, but it was now out of print.”

To her students’ credit, they found digitized copies of original editions of the novel from the 18th century, but according to Camden, those editions were poorly produced and often full of errors.

“In those cases, the students didn’t have any of the typical scholarly apparatus, like footnotes, to define archaic words or offer historical context,” she said.

Camden, who is also the Beverley J. Pitts Distinguished Professor of the Ron and Laura Strain Honors College, initially considered putting together a proposal for a new edition through a major publisher, but while presenting on the novel at a conference she met a scholar who told her such an update had already been unsuccessfully pitched to several publishers.

“I approached my colleagues in English who teach the Etchings courses at UIndy about whether we might consider publishing an edition through Etchings Press,” she said. “The advent of print-on-demand publishing meant that we could do so with relatively little seed money.”

Camden and her colleagues, including assistant professor Liz Whiteacre, Katherine Fries, and Randi Frye combined work from several of their classes to publish the novel. The process for publishing the novel was emblematic of the collaborative spirit of the University as it stretched across multiple courses across disciplines. 

Students learned how to produce a scholarly edition of the novel in ENGL 420: Critical Editions, taught by Camden. Students in ART 193: Beginning Illustration and ART 430: Advanced Illustration, taught by Randi Frye, illustrated key scenes from the novel. Assistant professor of English Liz Whiteacre’s ST 299: Book Publishing and Promotion course took files from the preceding courses to create the master design file of the book, completed its editing, and developed marketing materials to promote it. 

One of the students who worked on the project was Ali Viewegh ‘23 (English major, Professional Writing minor, Ron and Laura Strain Honors College), her role was to read the novel, identify passages that needed further explanation, research and then create footnotes for those pages. “I really enjoyed working with my class with this project, it required a lot of teamwork,” she said. “This project required all of us to work together, ask questions, and explore early English, Scottish, and sometimes even Swiss culture.”

Katherine Fries, associate professor of Art & Design and director of Hullabaloo Press, is working with the National Library Bindery Company of Indiana to provide an opportunity in the near future for students to hand-bind a limited, commemorative art edition of the novel and learn more about bookmaking.

This student-friendly edition of Ann Radcliffe’s first novel, now available for purchase on Amazon, includes illustrations and footnotes produced by students at University of Indianapolis, as well as an introduction by Dr. JoEllen DeLucia (Central Michigan University), who guides readers through this early Gothic novel. Set in medieval Scotland, “The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne” explores revenge and features warring clans, imprisoned heroes and heroines, a shipwrecked Count, stolen inheritances and many of the hallmarks of Radcliffe’s later Gothic fiction.

Book cover photo available here.

The novel was published through Etchings Press at the University of Indianapolis. “Before work on this project began, we’d been having discussions on how to expand the work that students are doing with Etchings and continue our collaboration with Hullabaloo Press,” Camden said. “Those two goals were able to serendipitously come together in this project!”

“We think this illustrated and annotated novel is one that English course instructors and literature lovers alike will enjoy,” said Whiteacre.

Viewegh added that working on a project like this helped her and her classmates hone their researching skills. “I think this project was important because it allowed the other students and I to work through researching dated and hard to find topics,” she said. “It allowed us to improve our research and comprehension skills, which was especially helpful with reading such a dated text like Ann Radcliffe’s first novel.”

“I am super happy that I was able to be a part of the class that researched and created the footnotes, and I’m proud of all of the other classes that worked so hard on the project, also!”

 

 

 

 

University of Indianapolis collaboration brings out-of-print novel into 21st century

University of Indianapolis faculty and students have collaborated to publish a previously out-of-print novel by Ann Radcliffe, “The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne (1789).” The project brought together faculty and students in the fields of English and the Studio Arts to publish an illustrated, scholarly edition of Radcliffe’s novel.

“We think this illustrated and annotated novel is one that English course instructors and literature lovers alike will enjoy,” said Liz Whiteacre, assistant professor of English.

This student-friendly edition of Ann Radcliffe’s first novel, now available for purchase on Amazon, includes illustrations and footnotes produced by students at University of Indianapolis, as well as an introduction by Dr. JoEllen DeLucia (Central Michigan University), who guides readers through this early Gothic novel. Set in medieval Scotland, “The Castles of Athlin and Dunbayne” explores revenge and features warring clans, imprisoned heroes and heroines, a shipwrecked Count, stolen inheritances and many of the hallmarks of Radcliffe’s later Gothic fiction.

Book cover photo available here.

Work for the publishing of the novel stretched across multiple courses at the University of Indianapolis. Students learned how to produce a scholarly edition of the novel in ENGL 420: Critical Editions, taught by Jennifer Camden, the Beverley J. Pitts Distinguished Professor of the Strain Honors College, professor and associate chair of English.

Students in ART 193: Beginning Illustration and ART 430: Advanced Illustration taught by Randi Frye (Franklin College), who was at the time assistant professor of Art & Design, illustrated key scenes from the novel. 

Assistant professor of English Liz Whiteacre’s ST 299: Book Publishing and Promotion course took files from the preceding courses to create the master design file of the book, completed its editing, and developed marketing materials to promote it. 

Katherine Fries, associate professor of Art & Design and director of Hullabaloo Press, is working with the National Library Bindery Company of Indiana to provide an opportunity in the near future for students to hand-bind a limited, commemorative art edition of the novel and learn more about bookmaking.

The novel was published through Etchings Press at the University of Indianapolis. “Before work on this project began, we’d been having discussions on how to expand the work that students are doing with Etchings and continue our collaboration with Hullabaloo Press,” Camden said. “Those two goals were able to serendipitously come together in this project!”

About Etchings Press

Etchings Press is the University of Indianapolis’ teaching press and publishing laboratory. Students engage with writers from the campus community and across the world, publishing a bi-annual literary and fine arts magazine, the Floodgate Poetry Series and three books each spring, producing a literary podcast, judging literary contests, and collaborating with UIndy’s Hullabaloo Press. Learn more: etchings.uindy.edu 

About Hullabaloo Press

Hullabaloo Press is the printmaking studio in the Department of Art & Design at the University of Indianapolis. Established in 2016, the mission of the printmaking program is to empower students, regardless of major, to explore and develop their unique artistic vision through printmaking. Printmaking and letterpress courses focus on the artistic development of studio artists and designers, community projects and collaborations, as well as the growth and maintenance of the physical printshop and letterpress studio and its equipment. Learn more: https://uindy.edu/cas/art-design/hullabaloo-press/ 

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

Greyhounds volunteer at the world’s largest collection of type

Wisconsin trip 6A group of Greyhounds recently spent five days as specialized volunteers at the world’s largest collection of type, thanks to a Shaheen Service Learning/Community Engagement Grant.

The Hamilton Wood Type and Printing Museum in Two Rivers, Wisconsin is the only museum of its kind, dedicated to the preservation, study, production, and printing of wood type.

Five advanced printmaking students, along with Assistant Professor Katherine Fries and Assistant Bursar Andrea Stranak, participated in the Spring Term Trip. They helped clean, catalog and organize the massive wood type, woodcut, and printing collection.

Wisconsin trip 5

“It was a remarkable exchange for the students that allowed them to engage a rare collection, learn about and participate with its preservation, and directly apply skills learned in class to the service of the print, letterpress, and design communities,” said Fries.

The project enabled the first of hopefully many UIndy students to take part in a transformational experience where two mottos meet and merge: UIndy’s “Education for Service” and the letterpress mantra “Preservation Through Production” – meaning that to preserve letterpress you have to actively engage the processes and physically use the equipment, Fries explained.

Hamilton, while internationally recognized by academic and print communities for their massive and one of a kind holdings of letterpress knowledge and equipment, relies heavily on volunteers.

“Our students in the four short years since the start of our program have proven themselves knowledgeable, skilled, and service-minded – making them ideal volunteers. This is an excellent example of how our programs can prepare students to not only excel in their discipline but to give back to it,” Fries added.

Learn more about the Hullabaloo Press at the University of Indianapolis

A University first: Kalia Daily ’18

Kalia DailyIn May 2018, Kalia Daily will be the first student to graduate with a concentration in printmaking from the studio art program. (She also has a concentration in painting and a minor in art history.)

“When I first came to UIndy, I must admit I was not confident in my abilities as an artist. Through the instruction of many of my professors, specifically Jim Viewegh and Katherine Fries, I was able to see my work grow and mature in ways that I never imagined,” she said.

The studio art program is designed so that all art students start at the beginning, learning the basics.

“I was introduced to artistic ideas that helped me see my work more critically, thus making it easier to pinpoint areas I needed to work in most,” Daily explained. “I was able to build upon those technical lessons to then enter into a realm where you can achieve certain conceptual ideals.”

Slideshow: Meet the Class of 2018!

She also said it was useful to learn how to operate the University’s new Vandercook Press because of its popularity in the printmaking world.

“It can produce quality work in little time, so it was important for me to learn how to operate a press that is so common in other print shops.”

Learn how UIndy art students, including Kalia Daily, received real-life client experience by collaborating with the Department of Theatre

"Happy Place" by Kalia Daily

“Happy Place” by Kalia Daily

Daily is a student employee in the print studio, an Art & Design Student Academy Club Leader, and a leader and mentor to upper and underclassmen alike.

“I am tremendously proud of what we call the ‘founding printers’ of the department,” said Katherine Fries, art & design professor. “Kalia and her peers have really brought this program to life. Their hard work, spirit, and dedication have seen the program through the first years of growth and for that they will always be part of the print program and Hullabaloo Press.”

Graduation can be a bittersweet moment, marking the end of one chapter and the start of another, but Fries sees it differently.  

“This is one of the many reasons I love UIndy: because students like Kalia come here and make wonderful things happen on our campus! Commencement is a magnificent time to look back at what was achieved and look forward to what still can be,” she said.

After graduating, Daily plans to enroll in the University’s Masters of Arts program, continue building her portfolio and pursue a Masters in Fine Arts Degree later in her career.

"Senses" by Kalia Daily

“Senses” by Kalia Daily

“Without the introduction and attention from the art & design faculty and staff, I would not be the artist I am today and I am forever grateful for their guidance and expertise.”

See Daily’s senior exhibition April 16 – 20 in the Student Gallery, Schwitzer 011.

 

UIndy professor’s artwork welcomes race fans to Indianapolis

As downtown Indianapolis welcomes thousands of race fans leading up to the Indianapolis 500, the talent of Katherine Fries, art faculty at the University of Indianapolis, will be showcased on the Indianapolis ArtsGarden.

"Welcome Race Fans" by Katherine Fries, University of Indianapolis assistant professor of art and design

“Welcome Race Fans” by Katherine Fries

Fries, assistant professor of art and design at the University, is one of five local artists commissioned to create signs welcoming fans to Indianapolis at locations across the city. The project connects Indianapolis’ thriving arts culture with the historic Indianapolis 500 and celebrates the history, culture and excitement of the month of May.
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