Interprofessional Education Week emphasizes benefits of multidisciplinary learning

SimulationExerciseCollaboration is key in today’s healthcare settings, and the inaugural Interprofessional Education Week at the University of Indianapolis will highlight the benefits of this approach for students, faculty, medical professionals and patients alike.

Taking place Oct. 1-5, 2018, with many events open to the public, Interprofessional Education (IPE) Week is the brainchild of organizers from the College of Health Sciences, the School of Nursing and the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences. Students will have the opportunity to participate in classroom and extracurricular activities to learn about trending topics in various healthcare fields.

While many interdisciplinary events are hosted each academic year, this marks the first time that organizers are bringing them together in a single week.

“Interprofessional practice and education are critical components of working in healthcare. It’s very rare that we as healthcare professionals work in a silo, where we don’t interact with anyone else,” said Alison Nichols, assistant professor of occupational therapy and IPE Week organizer.

IPE Week features a kick-off event Oct. 1, and panel discussions on topics including addiction, health disparities and ethics, which are all open to the public. Dr. Brenda Howard, an assistant professor of occupational therapy who serves on the Ethics Commission for the American Occupational Therapy Association, will speak about the importance of ethics and how that affects everyone, regardless of their profession.

Other events are aimed specifically at students in healthcare-related fields, including a home assessment, an emergency simulation and the Diabetes Escape Room.

Briyana Morrell, assistant professor of nursing and IPE Week organizer, said the goal is to encourage students to consider how they will address various patient needs alongside colleagues in other professions.

“We have found that some students do not even know what another profession is, what those professionals do, or settings in which they work,” Morrell explained. “These purposeful learning activities break down barriers and facilitate learning about quality healthcare while learning about each other.”

Nichols provided the example of an inpatient rehabilitation floor of a hospital, where a patient might come into contact with a physician, nurses, occupational and physical therapists, a social worker, pharmacists, speech language pathologists, and more. She said everyone on the patient’s team needs to work together – and IPE Week helps students recognize the benefits of collaboration.

“All of us engage in ethical behavior and decision-making; we all need to recognize the roles that each member of the team can play; we all need to be able to communicate effectively; and we all have to be able to collaborate in order to give the patient the best client-centered care possible,” Nichols explained.

The interprofessional perspective pays dividends for faculty as well as student success. Emergency simulations held in 2016 and 2017 have served as the basis for several scholarly pursuits for UIndy faculty, and dozens of faculty have presented posters or talks on IPE at regional, national and international conferences.

“Many of the faculty who are organizing this event also have an article in press, another under review, and a final one near submission. What’s more, these events have helped faculty learn about each others’ professions, programs, students, and work,” Morrell said.

Morrell encouraged the entire campus community to be part of the inaugural IPE Week.

“Even if you think you know a lot about healthcare, you may find you don’t know as much as you think and have room to learn and grow.  It will benefit you, your profession, other students, and your patients,” she said.

The Interprofessional Education Week planning committee would like to thank the following sponsors: Lambda Epsilon Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honor Society, the University of Indianapolis Center for Aging & Community, the Central Indiana Oncology Nursing Society and Community Health Network. Additional thanks to Zoll for cardiac resuscitative equipment.

Schedule of events (contact Alison Nichols with questions.)

Monday, Sept. 17

Event Location Time Audience
Diane Healey Geriatrician Lecture R.B. Annis Theatre, Health Pavilion 4 p.m. Public. L/P credit available.

Monday, Oct. 1

Event Location Time Audience
Panel discussion: Addictions R.B. Annis Theatre, Health Pavilion 9-11 a.m. Public
Kickoff event: Conceptions and Misconceptions: What do you Know about the Many Healthcare Professions? R.B. Annis Theatre, Health Pavilion noon-1 p.m. All healthcare students
Mock trial R.B. Annis Theatre, Health Pavilion 2-4 p.m. Public
Ask ProEdge: Resume and Career Coaching Health Pavilion atrium 9-11 a.m.
1-3 p.m.
All students

Tuesday, Oct. 2

Event Location Time Audience
Home assessment CLC apartment 8:30-11 a.m. Invitation only
Emergency simulation Health Pavilion and Nicoson Hall gym Noon-3 p.m. Invitation only for nursing and athletic training students
Virtual Dementia Tour CAC Apartment Round 1: 5-6:30pm

Round 2: 6:30-8pm

Public

RSVP to adriank@uindy.edu

Wednesday, Oct. 3

Event Location Time Audience
Home assessment CLC apartment 8:30-11 a.m. Invitation only
Panel discussion: Solving Ethical Problems Interprofessionally R.B. Annis Theatre, Health Pavilion 10-11:30 a.m. Public
Panel discussion: Interprofessional Practice: A Case Study with Community Health Network R.B. Annis Theatre, Health Pavilion 5:30-6:30 p.m. Public
Diabetes Escape Room Simulation Space, Health Pavilion 1-3 pm Invitation only
IPE Ask the Recruiter (with ProEdge) R.B. Annis Theatre, Health Pavilion 3-4:30 p.m. All students

Thursday, Oct. 4

Event Location Time Audience
Home assessment CLC apartment 8:30-11 a.m. Invitation only
Emergency simulation Health Pavilion 8-11 a.m.
12-3 p.m.
Invitation only for nursing and athletic training students
Panel discussion: Addictions R.B. Annis Theatre, Health Pavilion 6-8 p.m. Public
Women in Leadership: Strategies and Successes (LP credit) UIndy Hall B 6-8 p.m. Public

(note related to sport industry)

Friday, Oct. 5

Event Location Time Audience
Panel discussion: Health Disparities R.B. Annis Theatre, Health Pavilion 9-10 a.m. Public
Diabetes Escape Room Simulation Space, Health Pavilion 1-3 pm Invitation only
Breaking Down Stereotypes with OT and PT Across Campus; HEAL 208 12-1pm Current OT and PT students only

 

University of Indianapolis hosts Inaugural Chief Diversity Officers Symposium

The University of Indianapolis will host the Inaugural Chief Diversity Officers Symposium Sept. 11-13, 2018. The event is organized by CoopLew, a collaboration of national diversity researchers, experts and former chief diversity officers focused on developing transformative diversity leadership.

University of Indianapolis Officer of Inclusion and Equity Sean Huddleston explained that the decision to host the symposium aligns with the goal of positioning the University as a recognized diversity, equity and inclusion leader.

“We believe that by serving as a convener and major contributor for these types of conversations and events, UIndy can help organizations and institutions connect to research theory and practices centered on advancing innovative strategies for leveraging their diversity,” Huddleston said.

Around 20 chief diversity officers from higher education institutions across the country will be immersed in strategic approaches to finance, budgeting and strategic diversity fundraising.

“More and more, this is becoming an area of responsibility and focus for higher education chief diversity officers to help bolster their efforts while mitigating budget and funding limitations,” explained Huddleston. “However, there hasn’t been a great deal of training emphasis offered on fundraising for CDOs to match the increasing demand for these skills. This symposium will offer a particular focus on developing fundraising skills and strategies.”

CoopLew approached Huddleston earlier this year at the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education conference about the possibility of hosting their 2nd annual CDO Bootcamp for new higher education chief diversity officers in February 2019.

“We agreed to host the bootcamp, but recognized an additional opportunity to host their inaugural CDO symposium as well. We discovered lots of mutual benefit and decided to move forward with hosting both events,” Huddleston said.

Huddleston expects the number of symposium participants to grow in future years, and is looking into the University hosting the event annually.

Marc Milne discovers new species of spider in Indiana cave

Marc Milne, assistant professor of biology at the University of Indianapolis, outside the Stygeon River Cave in southern Indiana.

Marc Milne, assistant professor of biology at the University of Indianapolis, outside the Stygeon River Cave in southern Indiana.

Marc Milne, assistant professor of biology, has a knack for discovering new spider species. His latest publication, “A new species of spider (Araneae, Linyphiidae, Islandiana) from a southern Indiana cave” appeared in Subterranean Biology 26: 19-26. His work was covered by Fox News, MSN Australia and New Zealand, the CBC in Canada and highlighted in the Pensoft blog.

While it’s hard to put a number on the species Milne has discovered (some of these creatures belong to groups that haven’t been examined in 80 years), he said the most common group in which he finds new species is “Linyphiidae – sheet-web weaving spiders – the ones that build the webs that you can see early in the morning in your yard when the dew covers their webs,” Milne explained.

Milne’s work takes him from the sand dunes of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore to the dark caves of southern Indiana, and many nature preserves in between. New species he’s focusing on now are Ceraticelus sp. from the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore – found in the sand in the leaves near the dunes of Porter County, Lophomma sp. from leaf litter at Glacier’s End Nature Preserve  in Johnson County and Agyneta sp. from leaf litter in Yellowwood State Forest in Brown County.

Although Milne’s spiders are just a few centimeters long, he said there’s much to learn from these tiny creatures, which tend to be understudied because they’re harder to identify.

“These small organisms often play critical roles in our environment such as decomposition and the consumption of dangerous vectors of disease – like how spiders consume tons of mosquitoes each year,” he said.

 Islandiana lewisi

Islandiana lewisi

Milne’s latest cave-dwelling discovery, Islandiana lewisi, occurred in a matter of hours exploring the Stygeon River Cave, thanks to his colleague, Dr. Julian Lewis, an independent isopod taxonomist who was familiar with the cave. The new species, named for Dr. Lewis, may be the only species of spider living inside the cave.

“Cave-dwelling spiders are poorly known because not many scientists are also cavers,” Milne said. “Also, many caves are rarely visited and therefore underexamined. Conducting research on cave organisms can oftentimes yield interesting findings.”

Milne’s work involves frequent collaboration with undergraduate students. One group is currently working on research to add more records of known spider species living in Indiana. (Officially, Indiana has 454 spider species. After the publication of the upcoming research, there will be over 550.)

“I enjoy working with engaged students, because they make the work fun for me. It’s also great that they learn new techniques, get the opportunity to present their research, and have a leg-up on competition when it comes to applying for grad school or professional school,” Milne said.

Lucas Frandsen ‘19 (human biology, physical therapy concentration) is one of the students collaborating on the spider records project.

“The hope is we can take this data and use it to conserve habitats,” Frandsen said, noting that the research is important to anyone working within environmentalism and conservation. He also said he’s gaining useful professional skills in the process.

“I’ve written manuscripts before, but the standard we’re pushing this manuscript to is much higher so we can get it published. Dr. Milne asked me to do a lot of the writing and he’s been providing feedback. It’s definitely been a new and exciting experience.”

Read more about Milne’s research projects with undergraduate students.

Written by Sara Galer, University of Indianapolis senior communications specialist. Send your story ideas to newsdesk@uindy.edu.

 

 

University of Indianapolis Beyond Borders Team installing water stations in Texas borderlands

waterstation600BROOKS COUNTY, Texas – The University of Indianapolis Beyond Borders Team continues its humanitarian and scientific mission this month with the installation of water stations in South Texas. Led by Krista Latham, director of the University of Indianapolis Human Identification Center and associate professor of biology and anthropology, the team continued its collaboration with the South Texas Human Rights Center with the goal of preventing migrant deaths by installing the water stations.

Latham’s research and field work has brought national attention to the humanitarian crisis happening at the border. Since 2013, Latham and her graduate students on the Beyond Borders Team have been working with other organizations and universities to uncover remains from unmarked grave sites and identify the bodies of those who have died while making the journey to the United States.

Latham explained that the water stations are an important extension of the project’s ongoing work in South Texas.

Follow the Beyond Borders blog.

“Our work would not be necessary if there were not so many deaths in the desert due to overheating and dehydration.  This could partly be prevented by providing life-saving water. I believe our humanitarian aid contributions to this crisis are expressed in many different ways,” she said.

The group’s current trip to Brooks County involved the team successfully raising $750 to cover the cost of supplies for ten water stations. The students will prepare and set up the water stations at various locations throughout the county, which covers 944 square miles of brush land and desert.

“It is our hope that the donation and our work in setting up the new water stations will save countless lives,” Latham said.

The Beyond Borders Team will also participate in searches for the remains of those who died while crossing the border. If remains are located, Latham’s group will assist in recovering the remains so they can be identified and repatriated home.

As forensic specialists we volunteer a very specific skill set that contributes to the identification and repatriation of the unidentified migrants in the Texas Borderlands, but on a broader scale we are working to promote basic human rights. We are treating these individuals with dignity in death as we work towards giving them a name and a memory,” Latham said.

waterstation2For the students on the Beyond Borders Team, the trip is an opportunity to participate in a real world application of scholarly knowledge, skills and humanitarianism.  

“This opportunity represents hands-on training in the practice of global citizenship by empowering the students to utilize their education in a way that operates to promote a sense of common humanity and social responsibility. Promoting human rights and working for social justice in this unique situation will provide UIndy students the opportunity to grow professionally and personally,” Latham said.

Angela Zimmer, who is pursuing a master’s degree in human biology, is a team rookie on the trip.

“We are so proud of all we were able to achieve, but the reason for our work here has not been lost on us. The water stations we built today may save lives. The searches we conduct may help bring loved ones back to their families. Did we put in a lot of work today? Absolutely, but our work here is not finished. We’ve reached one goal but we’re only just getting started,” she said.

Follow the Beyond Borders blog.

 

Sociology Chair Amanda Miller garners national attention with housework study

Amanda Miller

Amanda Miller

A new study by University of Indianapolis sociology faculty member Amanda Miller finds that not only are today’s couples sharing the housework more so than couples of the past, but how those tasks are divided could make all the difference in determining a happy relationship.

“Stalled for Whom? Change in the Division of Particular Housework Tasks and Their Consequences for Middle- to Low-Income Couples” by Daniel L. Carlson (University of Utah), Amanda Miller (University of Indianapolis) and Sharon Sassler (Cornell University) appeared in the April 2018 issue of Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World. The research, which focused on specific household tasks, followed up on the group’s 2016 publication that found couples who divide the housework tend to have better sex lives than those who don’t. Both studies received attention from national media, including Marie Claire and  The Chicago Tribune.

The new study asked couples about their attitudes towards the division of household chores like dishwashing, meal preparation, cleaning, shopping, laundry, home maintenance and bills. Researchers found that dishwashing mattered the most to women in determining relationship satisfaction, while men were more concerned about shared shopping. For couples who didn’t share the dishwashing, this chore was the biggest source of discontent among women.

Amanda Miller, associate professor and chair of sociology, said the study offers several important findings.

“Certainly over time, from the early 1990s to the mid-2000s, conventional divisions of labor lead to less satisfaction and egalitarian divisions of labor lead to greater satisfaction,” Miller said.

For couples, it means that sharing chores does a lot more than just getting the task accomplished.

“What we think is happening is that it’s really fostering a sense of teamwork in the couple. Whenever you prepare meals together or do the dishes together, that’s time to reflect on the day and spend some time enjoying one another’s company. You feel like you’ve accomplished something together,” Miller said.

Learn more about the University of Indianapolis sociology program.

Another key idea is that shared shopping can stand-in for shared decision-making. Looking beyond day-to-day decision-making at the grocery store, Miller said there are implications for how financial power is divided within the relationship.

“Who gets to negotiate how much we’re spending, particularly on the larger purchases? When that’s mutually decided, perhaps that’s likely to lead to greater relationship satisfaction,” Miller explained.

The study included low- to moderate-income couples, a significant factor that demonstrates the division of household labor isn’t limited to college-educated, higher-income couples.

“This is really showing that gender egalitarianism is diffusing throughout the population,” Miller said.

As more couples divide household chores, Miller said there’s pressure to “keep up with the Joneses.” Women from previous generations who typically worked during the day would come home to face the chores without much help from their husbands, Miller said. At the time, the situation was the same for their friends. But today’s trend of sharing tasks creates a new set of expectations for couples.

Now when you look around and you see that many of your friends’ husbands are doing a big share of the housework and childcare, it feels particularly negative for you if you are the one who’s the outlier,” Miller explained.

She emphasized that there’s no “right way” of dividing household chores.

Quite frankly, the right way to do this is the way that both members of a couple want to do it. They need to make sure they’re on the same page of what they want this arrangement to look like,” she said.

Read more about the research here.

Written by Sara Galer, University of Indianapolis senior communications specialist. Send your story ideas to newsdesk@uindy.edu.

Graduate Real Estate Development students present inaugural capstones

From left to right: Mike Patarino, instructor and advisory board member, Justin Williams, Anne McKinley, Logan Brougher, and Eric Harvey, program director.

From left to right: Mike Patarino, instructor and advisory board member, Justin Williams, Anne McKinley, Logan Brougher, and Eric Harvey, program director.

The first cohort of students in the Master of Professional Studies in Real Estate Development program presented their capstone projects in April, just a week after students in the program won the NAIOP Urban Land Institute University Challenge for the second consecutive year.

Anne McKinley, Logan Brougher and Justin Williams showcased the final efforts of their degree in front of peers, family, and industry professionals. Each was tasked with selecting one of four options for their project:

    • A real estate development project proposal
    • Solving a critical problem with an industry partner
    • Creating a white paper that contributes to industry practice
    • A 7.5-week field experience

“This is an opportunity to showcase the skills they’ve learned and built upon in each course. It’s a culmination of their experience and backgrounds and what they want to do in the future,” said Eric Harvey, program director. “It’s an opportunity to propel them in the career of their choosing.”

Each of the students’ presentations showcased a different opportunity to innovate real estate development in the state of Indiana. For Justin Williams and Anne McKinley, that meant creating real development proposals from the ground up. Williams focused on tax credit-eligible low-income housing in the city square of Lebanon, Indiana. “Lebanon Lux” would support the influx of labor projected to join the city by 2022.

McKinley proposed Oak Ridge Springs, an amenity-rich neighborhood in the fast growing city of Westfield in Hamilton County. McKinley didn’t have to look far for inspiration when envisioning Oak Ridge Springs.

“I was really developing a neighborhood for myself,” McKinley says. “Driving around Carmel, I didn’t really find anything that fit my needs. Then I stumbled across this plot of land and the deal was made for me.”

The site plan for McKinley’s Oak Ridge Springs

The site plan for McKinley’s Oak Ridge Springs

During his first year in the program, Logan Brougher found an internship at Greenstreet Ltd., an Indianapolis-based real estate development firm. He has since progressed to full-time associate, and presented his project experience with Fort Wayne Electric Works, a reimagining of the General Electric campus in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The project, a joint venture with Greenstreet and Cross Street Partners, will transform the abandoned 39-acre space into a mixed-use district of “innovation, culture and community.”

Jeff Kingsbury, managing principal of Greenstreet Ltd., spoke highly of what the MPS has done for Logan.

“As [Logan] progressed in the program, he was able to immediately bring his learning from the classroom into the office,” Kingsbury said. “It was great for us an employer, and I think it was good for the program to have engaged working professionals in the classroom.”

Harvey reflected on the growth he has seen in the first cohort of graduates.

“They are brilliant people—that’s obvious. They’ve picked up technical real estate knowledge and are running with it. That was evident in their presentations, because if you ask any of the board members here, they would say these are real life projects that could be completed today. And that’s the goal of the program.”

Applications are currently being accepted for the fall 2018 Real Estate Development cohort. Eric Harvey can be reached at harveye@uindy.edu. Apply here.

Written by Logan McGrady, Communications Specialist for Graduate and Adult Learning Enrollment.

Institute for Postindustrial Leadership forges ties with local business

postindustrial750A new approach to leadership training is generating buzz at the University of Indianapolis. The Institute for Postindustrial Leadership presents a new paradigm for leadership in the 21st century, and local businesses are already reaping the benefits.

The Institute, led by School of Business faculty Terry Schindler, assistant professor of management, and Matthew Chodkowski, adjunct professor, conducts research, and offers training and consulting. On May 14th, the Institute will host the Leadership in the Twenty-First Century Breakfast Seminar designed for human resources professionals. Held at the Schwitzer Student Center on the University of Indianapolis campus, this event introduces HR professionals to basic concepts and research findings. (Contact Terry Schindler for more information.)

The seminar is just one example of how the Institute is engaging with the central Indiana business community. The Institute for Postindustrial Leadership supports a new paradigm of leadership principles – separating leadership from management by debunking traditional myths of leadership that have remained virtually unchallenged since the 1920s.

“Leadership is being redefined, reconceptualized, indeed revolutionized – and most people are not even aware of it,” said Chodkowski, who designed the Institute’s LEAD Program – The Journey of Discovery, a series of leader education and development workshops.

Today’s business world is complex, and in order to be effective, organizations need to look beyond the traditional model of management training. According to research conducted by the Institute for Postindustrial Leadership, it turns out that a leader’s style, which is highly regarded in the traditional leadership research approach, is not all that important. The leadership paradigm has a more direct effect on leader behavior, subordinates’ perceptions of leadership behavior and organizational culture.

“When you ask people about leadership, they’re really thinking about the leader’s traits and characteristics, not the process of leadership. This is a leader-centric view of leadership. We say the leader doesn’t equal leadership,” Schindler said.

“Our approach doesn’t focus on trying to change the leader’s behavior. It focuses on cognition and mental models and neuroscience. We want to change underlying assumptions about the way people think,” Chodkowski explained.

The Institute sets out to challenge those assumptions through its research and training programs. Their first research project was conducted at Caterpillar Remanufacturing Division in Franklin. Other clients include the Japanese firm Nidec in Shelbyville and Endress & Hauser in Greenwood.

At Caterpillar, the Institute worked with facility manager Don Kinsey and human resource manager Kevin Poad, who saw the partnership as an opportunity to engage their organization in an exciting research project and involve their managers in a unique personal growth and professional development experience. What followed was a nine-month project which included survey feedback, leader education, one-on-one leader coaching, and a master class customized specifically for Caterpillar to address the application of postindustrial principles, the integration of functions and departments, and the alignment of business strategy with organizational culture.

“The LEAD Program was certainly a journey of discovery for me and my team in Franklin,” Kinsey said. “This workshop introduced our organization to contemporary principles and practices that we have internalized as a daily practice.”

Related: New UIndy institute promoting a radically different approach to leadership (Indy Star)

The Institute, which was formed in 2017, is seeking to grow its partnership opportunities.

“We’re looking for more research partners and organizations who might want to investigate exposing their leaders to the postindustrial paradigm through a workshop methodology,” Schindler said.

In addition to building relationships with new community business partners, the Institute also welcomes nonprofits as well as University faculty and students who are interested in learning about the paradigm.

“We’re looking at all sectors for potential research partnerships. We’d love to form learning alliances in the service, finance, and health sectors, for example,” Chodkowski said.

Learn more here.

University of Indianapolis meets growing national need with Addictions Counseling masters and certificate programs

Featured speakers at the press conference included (from left) President Robert L. Manuel; Paul Babcock, Director of Indianapolis Office of Public Health and Safety; Rachel Halleck, Senior Director of Behavioral Health Services at Volunteers of America; State Senator James Merritt; Anita Thomas, Dean of the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences, and Norma Hall, dean of the School of Nursing. Photo:  D. Todd Moore.

Featured speakers at the press conference included (from left) President Robert L. Manuel; Paul Babcock, Director of Indianapolis Office of Public Health and Safety; Rachel Halleck, Senior Director of Behavioral Health Services at Volunteers of America; State Senator James Merritt; Anita Thomas, Dean of the College of Applied Behavioral Sciences, and Norma Hall, dean of the School of Nursing. Photo: D. Todd Moore.

INDIANAPOLIS – The University of Indianapolis is supporting the nationwide fight against addiction with the introduction of two new graduate programs in Addictions Counseling.

The Master of Arts in Addictions Counseling and the Interprofessional Certificate in Addictions fill a growing need locally and nationally to combat the addiction crisis. According to data from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs adds up to more than $740 billion annually in costs related to crime, lost work productivity and healthcare.*

“The University of Indianapolis recognizes the urgent need to address addiction and the toll it takes on communities in Indiana and throughout the nation. These programs offer students the opportunity to develop the professional skills necessary to reverse the effects of addictions and to help patients lead healthy, fulfilling lives,” said University of Indianapolis President Rob L. Manuel.

The Master of Arts in Addictions Counseling at the University of Indianapolis provides an interdisciplinary focus that blends psychology, social work, and counseling into a complete behavioral healthcare curriculum. The Interprofessional Certificate in Addictions provides unique training in addictions and highlights a holistic approach that emphasizes interprofessionalism.

“Medical providers have the opportunity to learn about counseling, and social workers and counselors can learn about medical and drug management. The curriculum is designed to help all students view their work with patients holistically,” said Norma Hall, School of Nursing dean.

“The curriculum for the certificate was built following research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse which shows greater improvement when health and behavioral health approaches are combined with employment and family components,” said Anita Thomas, College of Applied Behavioral Sciences dean.

The University of Indianapolis Master of Arts in Addictions Counseling will prepare individuals interested in working with clients diagnosed with substance abuse. No specific prerequisites are needed, and graduates become eligible for an addictions counselor license.

Learn more about the program.

*NIDA Trends & Statistics, 2018

About the University of Indianapolis

The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private, liberal arts university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. UIndy is ranked among the top Midwest Universities by the U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of more than 5,500 undergraduates, 1,300 graduate students and 400 continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100 undergraduate degrees, more than 35 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. With strong programs in the health sciences, engineering, business and education, UIndy impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” www.uindy.edu.

 

Enhanced summer class offerings accelerate student growth

canalsummer500The University of Indianapolis has a variety of summer classes on offer for 2018, and it’s not just UIndy students who can benefit. Students can choose from more than 200 classes in a variety of subjects, including general education courses eligible for transferable credit.

Summer term runs from May 15 to August 18, with options for face-to-face, online or hybrid classes. Most classes run for seven weeks over the Summer I and II sessions and cover a wide variety of disciplines, including English, history, biology, mathematical sciences and many more. The cost is $325 per credit hour.

Browse summer course offerings here.

Summer classes are an excellent opportunity for University of Indianapolis students who are looking to balance out their schedule or get caught up, or for visiting students home for the summer, said Mary Beth Bagg, Associate Provost for Academic Systems.

Bagg pointed out the advantages for student-athletes with tight in-season schedules or students who are anticipating a particularly challenging semester. Students participating in crossover programs, which combine the first year of graduate coursework with the student’s final year as an undergraduate, can accelerate their time frame by enrolling in summer classes.

“Students can budget time and credit hours in a way that considers the ebb and flow of their studies,” Bagg said.

Ellen Miller, Associate Provost for Research & Graduate Programs, explained that more students are taking advantage of summer classes to create the opportunity for double majors or an extra minor. She said academic departments examine summer enrollment data to make informed decisions about which classes to offer, including upper level as well as introductory courses.

“We’ve been looking at our constellation of offerings to identify key courses we should add. If a department knows there’s always a course with a waitlist, we might offer a section of that in the summer,” Miller said.

Miller noted that an increasing number of external students are enrolling in University of Indianapolis summer classes, providing UIndy students with the chance to gain perspective from new classmates. With a streamlined process for external students to apply for admission, those students should also check with their university’s registrar to determine which credits are transferable. (See details here.) Current UIndy students do not need to apply for admission and may register for classes via MyUIndy.

With more course sections available in an online format, there is even more flexibility. Whether a student is from Indiana or out of state, online classes are an option that can be accessed from any location. Miller observed that students from all over the country are participating in UIndy’s online programs during the summer.

“For UIndy students who are going home for the summer, wherever home may be, they can live at home and work, and still take an online class,” Miller said. She noted that online classes tend to fill up quickly, as do on-the-ground science labs.

Miller urged students to start thinking about their summer coursework and apply now before classes fill up.

“It’s a great way to catch up or get ahead,” she said.

Schedule and deadlines (for most classes):

Summer I start date:  Monday, 5/14
Summer I end date:  Friday, 6/29
Deadline to add a 7-week Summer I course:  Friday, 5/18
Deadline to withdraw from a 7-week Summer I with a grade of W: Friday, 6/8

Summer II start date:  Monday, 7/2
Summer II end date:  Friday, 8/17
Deadline to add a 7-week Summer II course:  Friday, 7/6
Deadline to withdraw from a 7-week Summer II with a grade of W:  Friday, 7/27

Browse summer course offerings here.

1 4 5 6 7 8 10