Carey Dahncke named new CELL executive director

Carey_DahnckeThe University of Indianapolis has named Carey Dahncke as executive director of the Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL). Dahncke will begin work on August 31, 2020.

Dahncke brings 28 years of experience as an educator, having taught in secondary and elementary classrooms—including a year in rural England as part of the Fulbright program. Dahncke transitioned into urban education in 1997 when he joined Indianapolis Public Schools to engage in school improvement work as a new principal. In 2006 he was recruited to help Christel DeHaan’s fledgling charter school. Under his leadership, the single school grew into an award-winning network serving impoverished children and adults across the city.  Most notably, in 2013 he was named by MetLife and NASSP as one of ten national Breakthrough Principals for dramatically improving the academic outcomes of students living in poverty.  

Since 2001, CELL has engaged in education transformation efforts to make Indiana a national model for educational excellence. Its efforts have focused on bringing Early College opportunities to high school students across the state, as well as the STEM Teach initiative aimed at increasing the number of highly qualified science, technology, engineering and mathematics teachers for Indiana schools. 

“CELL’s work has been integral in connecting Indiana school districts with innovative strategies to engage the most pressing education issues of our time,” said Robert L. Manuel, University of Indianapolis president. “The University is thrilled to welcome Carey Dahncke to this pivotal leadership role. Carey’s dedication to servant leadership and educational transformation will help lead CELL’s future evolution within the University of Indianapolis.”  

“I look forward to joining the University of Indianapolis, as I’ve long been an admirer of the mission and its work,” Dahncke said. “For many years, CELL has been at the center of educational innovation across the region. Now, during these unprecedented times, the need to support dynamic educational leadership in Indiana couldn’t be more vital. Building on CELL’s phenomenal success, I am eager to help schools expand outstanding educational opportunities for all Hoosier students.”

As executive director of CELL, Dahncke will oversee strategic planning, staffing, budgeting, advocacy, school and government relations and other statewide initiatives, including the Education Workforce Innovation Network, STEM Teach, the Lilly Endowment Comprehensive Counseling Initiative and Early College High School. Dahncke will report to Interim Vice President and Provost Mary Beth Bagg, and will work closely with School of Education Dean John Kuykdendall on collaborative initiatives.

Immediate past CELL Executive Director Janet Boyle will continue to direct the Rural Early College Network project. Under Boyle’s leadership, CELL secured several key grants for important initiatives, including the $7.9M federal grant through the Education Innovation and Research program and a $2.4M award from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education. Boyle also led the statewide Early College initiative and created the STEM Teach initiative in partnership with Independent Colleges of Indiana.

“I would like to express my gratitude for Janet Boyle’s leadership and innovation. Janet’s work has ensured CELL’s strong presence at regional and national levels, which has allowed us to connect with educational leaders across the country and explore how our educational system can respond to the complexities of our world,” President Manuel said.

UIndy and Vincennes University announce transfer agreement for accelerated public health education and promotion program

The University of Indianapolis and Vincennes University announced today a transfer agreement establishing a seamless transition for qualifying students between Vincennes University’s Associate of Science in Education with Health Promotion and Health Education Concentration to the University of Indianapolis Bachelor of Science in Public Health Education and Promotion – Accelerated Bachelor’s Program.

The partnership will provide opportunities for adults looking to develop professional skills in the area of public health and meet an urgent need in our communities. The need for public health education specialists is on the rise in a myriad of public health areas including weight management, disease and illness prevention, proper nutrition, exercise and more.

“The University of Indianapolis is excited to offer this opportunity at a time when the need for professionals in this field continues to grow,” said Robert L. Manuel, president of the University of Indianapolis. “The partnership expands access to a high-quality public health degree and will fulfill critical regional demands for public health professionals.”

Vincennes University provides students with a sound, comprehensive introduction to a health and wellness related career and prepares them to potentially gain employment in a variety of settings, including public and private education, national, state and local health agencies and private industry. 

“VU is proud to work once more with the University of Indianapolis on an innovative program,” said Chuck Johnson, president of Vincennes University. “This partnership represents a commitment by both institutions to developing and delivering affordable, accessible pathways to rewarding careers to both adult and traditional students.”

The transfer agreement aims to provide an opportunity for non-traditional students who are not directly out of high school and who fall under the category of “adult learner.” According to the agreement, Vincennes University graduates from the associate of science degree program of study in Education and Health Promotion and Health Education concentration may transfer to the University of Indianapolis and apply a minimum of 60 credit hours from that completed degree to the requirements for the bachelor of science degree in Public Health Education and Promotion – Accelerated Bachelor’s Program. 

Students who enroll in the Public Health Education and Promotion program at the University of Indianapolis have access to major health resources and hospital systems within miles of campus and will work alongside faculty members to conduct research on various health topics. The program provides a solid foundation for those who look to advance their education with a graduate degree in occupational or physical therapy.

About the College of Health Sciences

UIndy’s College of Health Sciences offers nationally ranked programs within the Krannert School of Physical Therapy and the School of Occupational Therapy, as well as highly regarded programs in kinesiology, gerontology, athletic training and other health professions, preparing students for a wide variety of health and sports-related professions. The College is distinguished through rigorous academics, research, applied learning in clinical settings, and highly competitive internships. With associate to doctoral level degree offerings, programs within the College educate all levels of students to positively impact the health of the community. Graduate certificate and special certification programs also are available.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 6,000 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

About Vincennes University

VU is state-supported with campuses in Vincennes and Jasper, the Aviation Technology Center and American Sign Language program in Indianapolis, Early College Career and Technical Education Centers, and additional sites such as the Gene Haas Training and Education Center in Lebanon, the Logistics Training and Education Center in Plainfield, and the Gibson County Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Logistics in Fort Branch. VU offers online degrees and classes to students who need access to college courses and flexibility through its Distance Education. A leader in dual credit and career and technical education statewide, VU also offers instruction at military sites throughout the nation. In addition to offering a wide range of associate degree and certificate programs, it also offers bachelor’s degree programs. VU’s tuition and fees are the lowest among Indiana campuses with residence halls. Founded in 1801, VU is Indiana’s first college and is the only college in the nation founded by an individual who would later become President of the United States. William Henry Harrison, the ninth U.S. President, founded VU while serving as governor of the Indiana Territory. More information is available at www.vinu.edu.

University of Indianapolis announces Dean’s List, Honor Roll and Annual Honor Roll

The University of Indianapolis has published a list of students who have been named to the Dean’s List or Honor Roll for Semester II, and/or the Annual Honor Roll of the 2019-20 academic year.

Searchable online listings of students named to the Dean’s List, Honor Roll or Annual Honor Roll are available at http://news.uindy.edu/honors. Visit this page to verify information or search for other students from your area, and feel free to bookmark the link for future reference. The site lists students alphabetically by last name and also offers the ability to search by hometown or zip code.

Students named to the Dean’s List have completed at least 12 hours during a regular semester and earned a grade point average of 3.7 or higher. Honor Roll students have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours and earned a grade point average of at least 3.4 but less than 3.7. Annual and Semester Honor Rolls and Dean’s List encourage scholarship of high quality and give appropriate public acknowledgment to students whose work deserves recognition.

University of Indianapolis named College of Distinction for 4th consecutive year

Indianapolis—The University of Indianapolis has been recognized for its honorable commitment to engaged, experiential education by Colleges of Distinction, which is celebrating its 20-year anniversary as a one-of-a-kind guide for college-bound students. Colleges of Distinction boasts its longstanding support for student-centered schools that traditional rankings often overlook. As an institution whose primary goals are based on student success and satisfaction, the University of Indianapolis confirms its honor as one of the renowned Colleges of Distinction for the fourth consecutive year. 

While higher education has changed over the last 20 years, Colleges of Distinction’s selection process has stayed consistent—conducting in-depth research and detailed interviews with the schools themselves about each institution’s freshman experience and retention efforts alongside its general education programs, career development, strategic plan, student satisfaction and more—and accepting only those that adhere to the Four Distinctions: Engaged Students, Great Teaching, Vibrant Community, and Successful Outcomes. Overlaid in the last few years have been a look into High-Impact Practices. This model prioritizes the opportunities institutions have for students that make for a fulfilling, individualized college experience.

Along with being honored as a College of Distinction with fewer than 400 other institutions across the United States, for its high-impact approach to education, the University of Indianapolis has received specialized recognition for its Business, Education, Nursing, and Engineering programs. These additional accolades were borne out of a need for college curricula that are comprehensive not only in course material, but also in practical- and soft-skills development. 

The University of Indianapolis has also received special recognition for its Career Development program. Schools awarded the Career Development badge have shown that they are well equipped to help their students graduate with confidence. The badge recognizes schools with comprehensive four-year plans, advising, and more. The University of Indianapolis offers numerous resources through its Professional Edge Center, providing unparalleled support throughout every stage of career exploration, development, and application.

About Colleges of Distinction

Since 2000, Colleges of Distinction has been committed to honoring schools throughout the U.S. for true excellence in higher education. The member schools within the Colleges of Distinction consortium distinguish themselves through their dedicated focus on the undergraduate experience. Its website provides dynamic college profiles, customized tools, and resources for students, parents, and high school counselors. For more information, and to learn how to become a College of Distinction, visit CollegesofDistinction.com.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 6,000 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

University of Indianapolis nurse practitioner program earns top ranking from Learn.org

Indianapolis—The University of Indianapolis was recently named to Learn.org’s list of the 50 best schools at which to pursue a nurse practitioner degree. The category includes programs offered in hybrid format (on-campus, online and clinical experiences). The University ranked #16 on the list and was the only program in Indiana to be ranked.

Learn.org, which began its rankings in 2003, considered hundreds of universities across the country and selected the University of Indianapolis based on academic and career resources, the quality of education, faculty, flexibility, cost, residency requirements, program length and more.

“We are very pleased to see our program earn this recognition, and be one of a handful of schools in the Midwest represented,” said Dr. Norma Hall, dean of the School of Nursing. “Our nurse practitioner graduates specialize in aiding those in vulnerable or underserved populations, the importance of which has been highlighted as our healthcare system has strained under the realities of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

The University of Indianapolis nurse practitioner program is offered in hybrid format, which includes an online component as well as clinical hour requirements in diverse settings that allow students to develop skills under a variety of circumstances. The program can be completed in three years. University of Indianapolis graduates have achieved a 100% pass rate on the AANP national FNP Certification Exam.

Earlier this spring the University of Indianapolis School of Nursing online programs made the U.S. News & World Report’s Top 100 Schools in 2020, moving up 57 points in the Best Online Master’s in Nursing Programs category from 118 to 61. The master’s program in nursing also was recognized in the rankings at 112.

About the School of Nursing

The UIndy School of Nursing is known for its leading-edge programs at all degree levels that consistently rank among the top in the state, with high passing rates on state licensing exams. UIndy also offers the only Neonatal Nurse Practitioner master’s degree program in the state.

Our faculty bring decades of clinical experience in a wide range of specialties. Many are doctorally prepared and have excellent reputations for their leadership roles in health care communities locally, nationally and internationally. UIndy’s “Education for Service” motto is deeply embedded in the nursing curriculum. Students will find service-learning components in many of our courses, along with a variety of volunteer and mission opportunities each year. Learn more: uindy.edu/nursing.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 6,000 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

University of Indianapolis R.B. Annis School of Engineering graduates first cohort

The R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis recently graduated its first cohort of students. Fifteen students received their diplomas in May, having completed programs in computer science, mechanical engineering, industrial and systems engineering and software engineering. The University created the engineering program in 2016 to address rising workforce demand and announced the R.B. Annis School of Engineering in 2017, made possible through a generous gift from the R.B. Annis Educational Foundation.

“I am grateful to our faculty for creating an innovative curriculum and real-life learning opportunities that have established the R.B. Annis School of Engineering as a formidable and competitive program that honors the creative spirit of Robert B. Annis,” said Robert L. Manuel, University of Indianapolis president. “Congratulations to the first cohort on their incredible achievements.”

“The R.B. Annis School of Engineering has significantly enhanced the landscape of the University of Indianapolis,” said Debra Feakes, Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences dean. “By structuring our engineering program within the arts and sciences, UIndy offers boundless opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration that further prepares our students for the professional world.”

A student works in the engineering machine shop at the R.B. Annis School of Engineering

A student works in the engineering machine shop at the R.B. Annis School of Engineering.

With the launch of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering in 2017, the graduation of this cohort is an important step towards program accreditation. The first group of R.B. Annis School of Engineering programs coming up for accreditation through the national Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) includes mechanical engineering, industrial and systems engineering, and software engineering.  

ABET evaluates programs based on student performance, educational objectives, program curriculum and other factors. The accreditation process necessitates the program have a graduating class so that the ABET may evaluate the cycle of a completed program. Accreditation status is retroactive to the program’s first graduating class.

In 2023 the next group of programs to undergo the accreditation process includes electrical engineering, computer engineering, general engineering and computer science.

Students in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering, one of only two stand-alone engineering programs in the city of Indianapolis, have access to many unique experiences that supplement their classroom work under world-class faculty. The DesignSpine curriculum emphasizes project-oriented courses integrated with hands-on experiences. Students who study a broader variety of subjects develop valuable communication skills such as business and technical writing, public speaking and presentation readiness. This unique educational experience encourages students to immerse themselves in the engineering world by challenging themselves to think bigger, imagine greater and continuously work to improve and expand their knowledge.

As part of the School of Engineering’s unique DesignSpine curriculum, students in the third year of the program take part in a business pitch competition where they work in interdisciplinary teams to design and pitch a product, process or service in collaboration with industry mentors. Teams present their work to stakeholders from within and outside of the School of Engineering, including mentors from organizations such as Citizens Energy Group, Huntington Bank, and Anthem NGS. Students in the program also have access to the Engineering Makerspace, a unique environment for project-oriented learning and student research.

Alum Paul Corsaro announced as men’s basketball head coach

Corsaro-FW-head-shotThe University of Indianapolis is proud to welcome back Paul Corsaro as its next men’s basketball head coach. A UIndy alumnus, Corsaro previously served as an assistant coach for the Greyhounds for six seasons prior to spending the last two years in the same capacity at Purdue Fort Wayne.

“I am excited to bring a member of the Greyhound family back to UIndy to lead the men’s basketball program,” said Scott Young, Senior Associate Athletics Director and future Vice President of Intercollegiate Athletics. “Paul checks all the boxes we were looking for in our next head coach. We were looking for someone familiar with the city of Indianapolis and UIndy, and someone who has a passion and energy for the game of basketball.”

An Indianapolis native and graduate of local Roncalli High School, Corsaro’s time on the UIndy bench coincided with some of the most successful seasons in school history. He aided the Greyhounds during four 20-win seasons as an assistant, including four consecutive NCAA tournament berths from 2013-16. He helped guide the Hounds to a combined 49 wins in 2013-14 and 2014-15 campaigns, with the latter’s 25 victories good for the most by a Greyhound squad in 50 years. The ’14-15 club spent nine weeks ranked in the top 10, including a two-week stay at No. 1, before earning the program’s first-ever “Sweet Sixteen” berth.

Corsaro moved on to Purdue Fort Wayne as an assistant under head coach Jon Coffman in 2018. The Mastodons amassed 32 wins in Corsaro’s two seasons, including a third-place finish in The Summit League in 2018-19.

“I am truly honored to be named head men’s basketball coach at the University of Indianapolis,” Corsaro stated. “I want to thank President Manuel, Scott Young and Dr. Sue Willey for believing in me and giving me this opportunity. Thank you to my parents and my entire family, both immediate and extended, for their unwavering love and support.

“I also would like to thank Stan Gouard. Stan was my coach and my boss while at UIndy, and he has continued to be a mentor and friend. It is a privilege to be his successor.”

“Finally, thank you to Jon Coffman and Purdue Fort Wayne for giving me two memorable years with their program and helping aid in my preparation for this new opportunity. I am so excited and cannot wait to get started.”

As a two-sport student-athlete at UIndy, Corsaro earned three varsity letters playing basketball for Gouard and three more as a member of the Greyhound football team (2009-10, ’12). He was a part of Gouard’s first NCAA Tournament team in 2011 and a member of the Hounds’ first DII football playoff team in 2012. He still holds the modern football program record for most rushing touchdowns by a quarterback with eight in 2010.

Corsaro graduated with a bachelor’s degree in communication in 2012 and a master’s in business administration in 2014, both from UIndy.

Young added: “The expectations for the program will remain the same under Paul’s leadership. Our student-athletes will continue to win as students, win as people and win as athletes.”

WHAT THEY’RE SAYING ABOUT CORSARO

UIndy Vice President of Intercollegiate Athletics Dr. Sue Willey…

“I’m thrilled for Paul to be returning to UIndy to be our next basketball coach. Paul was such a tremendous and hard-working student-athlete before becoming an assistant coach in 2012, and was instrumental in our team’s success while he was here. This is his dream job; he’s a Greyhound through and through. I’m excited to see him grow the tradition here and continue this legacy.”

 

Former UIndy head coach Stan Gouard…

“Paul gave his heart and soul to me, our program, the community, and UIndy for nine years. He was a vital part of the successes we had during his tenure as a student-athlete and assistant coach. He made our program better every day with his love and passion for UIndy. I am certain that he will make UIndy and the community better. He is a very special coach and person to me and my family.”

 

Fort Wayne head coach Jon Coffman…

“I’m so excited for Paul because UIndy is his dream job. He is going to work relentlessly and bring so much passion towards the program because of his deep roots to both the University and the city.  And who could be better to sell UIndy than a two-sport alum that holds two degrees from the University. I could see him continuing the success that he helped to create there for the next 30 years. Paul brought great passion, organization, energy, work ethic and discipline to the Mastodon program over his two years. I have no doubt that he is going to do a great job at his alma mater.”

University of Indianapolis selects Scott Young as Vice President for Intercollegiate Athletics

Scott Young

Scott Young

The University of Indianapolis has named Scott Young to serve as the next Vice President for Intercollegiate Athletics. Young will assume the role on September 1, 2020, following the retirement of Sue Willey, who served in the position for 17 of her 45 years of service to the University.

Young’s selection for the cabinet position follows a nationwide search to fill the top leadership role for the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. During his 26-year career at the University of Indianapolis, Young has served in numerous roles within the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics, most recently as Senior Associate Athletic Director for Compliance. His achievements include regulating all compliance for 23 NCAA sports programs at the University, oversight of the Sports Medicine and Sports Information Departments and multiple athletic programs, and serving as tournament director for NCAA playoff games and tournaments.

“Scott demonstrates an equal commitment to the University of Indianapolis and to the principles of excellence that define our campus culture,” said President Robert L. Manuel. “Scott’s dedication to accountability and clear communication, combined with his innovative ideas for growing our athletics program both in terms of public awareness and in breadth, will be a vital asset in University initiatives including recruitment and retention.”

During the past two decades, Scott has excelled at each of his positions serving the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics, and I’m sure that will continue in this important leadership role,” said Sue Willey, Vice President for Intercollegiate Athletics. “Scott is a dedicated UIndy person through and through. His love for the institution will be a constant support for athletics and the University.”

“I would like to thank Dr. Manuel and the search committee for this tremendous opportunity to lead UIndy athletics, the place I have called home for the past 26 years. I also would like to thank Sue Willey for her incredible mentorship and support, which have helped foster me into the leader I am today,” Young said. “The standards for UIndy athletics will continue to be for our student-athletes to win as students, win as people, and win as athletes.”

President Manuel also noted Sue Willey’s legacy that catapulted University of Indianapolis athletics to national recognition and countless accolades, including 90 Academic All-America honorees, a mark that is in the top ten in NCAA Division II. 

“I would like to express my gratitude to Sue Willey for her many years of service to the University of Indianapolis and for her remarkable accomplishments that have positioned the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics to continue to climb to new heights,” President Manuel said. “Scott is ideally suited to build on the high standards of success that Sue established.”

Young received a Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training from the University of Indianapolis in 1999 and obtained his Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction from the University in 2002. 

His previous roles include assistant head baseball coach and coordinator of game-day operations. As a member of the 2000 coaching staff, Young was inducted into the UIndy Athletics Hall of Fame in 2012 with the entirety of the 2000 baseball squad. He has also served as an adjunct instructor in the University’s kinesiology department, and prior to joining the baseball coaching staff, he served as an athletic trainer working with baseball, basketball, football, wrestling, and soccer.

About the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics
The University of Indianapolis Department of Intercollegiate Athletics is nationally recognized as one of the top overall athletic programs in NCAA Division II. With nearly 700 student-athletes, the department boasts a 3.32 GPA for all 23 sports. Notable achievements include top-10 finishes in the Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup seven out of the last eight years, Great Lakes Valley Conference All-Sports Trophy wins for eight consecutive years and women’s golf national championships in both 2015 and 2018. The department’s mission is to provide opportunities for participation in intercollegiate athletics in an environment that encourages the achievement of athletic excellence and good sportsmanship while maintaining the proper balance between participation in athletics and the educational and social life common to all students. Learn more: athletics.uindy.edu.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 6,000 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

 

 

University of Indianapolis occupational therapy and physical therapy programs ranked among national top 50 by U.S. News & World Report

The annual U.S. News & World Report graduate school rankings were released this week and UIndy’s occupational therapy and physical therapy programs both ranked in the top 50 programs in the nation. Both programs were each recognized as the top-ranking programs in Indiana.

The University of Indianapolis occupational therapy (OT) program, which offers both master’s and entry-level doctoral degrees, ranked 29 out of 198 OT schools. The Doctor of Physical Therapy program ranked 42 out of 239 physical therapy programs across the country. 

“We are excited to have our two largest graduate programs listed in the top 20 percent of graduate programs in their respective fields,” said Dr. Stephanie Kelly, dean of the College of Health Sciences. “The rankings, which are based on the quality of the academics we offer, are a testament to the faculty who work together to ensure our students are well-prepared to take their place in the healthcare industry when they graduate.” 

Among the notable aspects of both programs is the Community Patient Resource Group (CPRG). CPRG brings community volunteers living with a range of disabilities into the classroom with students, who receive real-world experience working with patients with various diagnoses from as early as the first month of their program. 

Nursing programs also recognized
University of Indianapolis School of Nursing online programs made the U.S. News & World Report’s Top 100 Schools in 2020, moving up 57 points in the Best Online Master’s in Nursing Programs category from 118 to 61. The master’s program in nursing also was recognized in the rankings at 112.

Update on University of Indianapolis campus events

The University of Indianapolis shared the following message about campus events with supporters of the arts as well as the campus community. Get the latest updates on the University of Indianapolis’ response to COVID-19.

The University of Indianapolis appreciates your support and interest in the many arts and cultural events hosted on campus throughout the year. We are sharing this message with you to keep you informed about the University’s response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

First, it is important to know that we still do not have any confirmed cases of COVID-19 infections within our UIndy community. Even without an active case, we believe that we must do our best to help prevent the community spread of the disease.

We have been in constant communication with many experts in the field to determine our best course of action regarding our policies on group activities. Pursuant to the guidance and advice provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Indiana State Department of Health, and World Health Organization (WHO), the University has made the difficult decision to suspend all campus events until it is deemed safe to return to business as usual. This includes all scheduled performances at the Ruth Lilly Performance Hall in the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center.

These events include, but are not limited to, all intercollegiate athletic events, practices, and competitions; lectures and performances (L/P events); RSOs (registered student events); intramurals; music performances; arts and culture events; campus activities; speakers series; prospective student events; celebrations/parties; University staff and faculty meetings containing more than 50 individuals; church/worship services; seminars, camps and conferences; and any event the University is hosting on behalf of another organization.

We are heartbroken that we have to suspend all of these events. We know how hard students, faculty and visiting guest artists have practiced, rehearsed, and planned for these. Wherever possible, we hope to reschedule as many of these events as we can. Thank you for your patience and understanding.

Please check events.uindy.edu for updates.

 

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