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For further information on the university or any items posted here, contact media relations director Scott Hall at (317) 788-3583 or schall@uindy.edu.

UIndy News

In the news: lacrosse, first family, forensics

Willey

Willey

The first season is more than a year away, but the UIndy men’s and women’s lacrosse program leads a story in this week’s Indianapolis Business Journal. Sports business reporter Anthony Schoettle talks with Sue Willey, our VP for Intercollegiate Athletics, about why adding the sport is a strategic move for Midwestern universities. Subscribers can read the story here.

Leading lacrosse website laxpower.com also picked up the news about the coaching team hired to launch the sport at UIndy. Learn more about coaches Greg Stocks and Jillian Howley at the Athletics website.

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Rob and Wilmara Manuel

Rob and Wilmara Manuel

UIndy’s first couple, Rob and Wilmara Manuel, are featured in a NUVO Newsweekly story about last week’s naturalization ceremony in Indianapolis, where 101 local residents became U.S. citizens just in time for the Fourth of July. The Manuels were guest speakers for the event.

See NUVO’s story and photo gallery here. More photos are on President Manuel’s Facebook page.

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Latham

Latham

The UIndy forensics team led by Dr. Krista Latham continues to gain attention for its humanitarian work in southern Texas, where the group seeks to identify the remains of migrants who have died while pursuing new lives in the United States.

Foreign Affairs magazine covers the project in a piece headlined “Northbound: What happens after crossing the border,” which can be read here (free registration required). The story also is available at the website of writer Ananda Rose, who is exploring the technical aspects of the work for a separate upcoming piece in Scientific American magazine.

The Corpus Christi Caller-Times — following up on a story that spread worldwide last month — just published another piece on the project, this time focusing on the science involved. The online version is available only to subscribers, but the text is below.

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Prof named among ‘influential Hoosiers’

Schmidt

Schmidt

Professor Christopher Schmidt of UIndy’s Department of Anthropology is celebrated in an Indianapolis Star column headlined “5 overlooked yet influential Hoosiers.”

Schmidt, director of the department’s Indiana Prehistory Laboratory, is cited for accomplishments including a student archeological dig that uncovered a 10,000-year-old bone tool, the oldest ever documented in Indiana. He’s one of just two contemporary figures on the list, which also includes 1830s Indian leader Chief Menominee and Underground Railroad supporters Levi and Catharine Coffin.

The Star piece was penned by award-winning journalist, author and historian Nelson Price, host of the Hoosier History Live! radio show. He has featured Schmidt twice on the program, which airs at noon Saturdays on UIndy’s WICR-FM/HD.

Though it’s not clear that an internationally known scientist can be considered “overlooked” (Price himself uses the term “under-known”), we agree Dr. Schmidt is influential and deserves any attention he gets. Not one to rest on his laurels, he and his students have kept busy recently with projects including a May trip to Italy to study victims of the A.D. 79 eruption of Vesuvius, as well as a study of teeth from burials at Britain’s Canterbury Cathedral to learn about the diet and social roles of medieval children.

Read Price’s Star story here.

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IR prof is featured speaker for elite D.C. event

Woodwell

Woodwell

Associate Professor of International Relations Douglas Woodwell is heading to Washington, D.C., this weekend, and not just to watch fireworks on the National Mall.

Dr. Woodwell is the featured speaker for a special event hosted by the Truman National Security Project, an institute dedicated to developing the next generation of leaders in the realms of politics, policy and the military.

The program, “Ukraine and the Future of Nationalism in International Conflict,” is described as “an intimate conversation on Ukraine and what challenges the United States will face as we seek to find a policy approach that balances the protection of sovereign states’ territorial integrity with support for national self-determination.” It takes place Monday at the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition Headquarters.

Woodwell, who holds a Ph.D. from Yale University, specializes in the study of international conflict. He blogs about global issues at woodwellontheworld.net.

UIndy offers a bachelor’s degree as well as Indiana’s only master’s degree in international relations. Learn more here.

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In the news: UIndy alumni on the rise

Myers

Myers

Mary Myers, who earned her Master’s of Science in Nursing from UIndy, has been named chief nursing officer for St.Vincent Indianapolis Hospital, St.Vincent Women’s Hospital, Peyton Manning Children’s Hospital at St.Vincent and the St.Vincent Stress Center. She previously served as chief nursing officer and vice president of patient care services at Indiana University Health West Hospital in Avon. Read more here.

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Carson

Carson

David Carson, who earned his bachelor’s in Accounting and Economics from UIndy, has been named vice president of business services at Florida’s Flagler College. As such, he will be involved in shaping the overall direction of the college and carrying out its daily operations. He served previously as vice president for business and chief financial officer at Armstrong Atlantic State University in Georgia. Read more here.

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Amber Raley, who earned her bachelor’s in Social Work at UIndy, has been named social services director at Avon Health & Rehabilitation Center’s Autumn Woods Memory Care Unit. She will be responsible for providing medically related social services to long-term care patients and residents with Alzheimer’s or dementia. She previously worked as a child and family therapist at Meridian Health Services. Read more here.

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Dr. Manuel to speak at citizenship ceremony

President Manuel

President Manuel

UPDATE: The ceremony grew to 101 new citizens. See NUVO Newsweekly’s coverage here, and see more photos on President Manuel’s Facebook page.

In a special ceremony Thursday, 75 Indiana residents will become U.S. citizens, and UIndy President Robert Manuel and his wife, Wilmara, will welcome them as the featured speakers.

U.S. District Court Judge Sarah Evans Barker will preside over the Fourth of July Naturalization, which begins at 10 a.m. (July 3) on the lawn of the historic Benjamin Harrison Home on North Delaware Street. The Manuels also will help hand out the naturalization certificates and congratulate the new citizens.

The annual summer ceremony for people who have qualified for citizenship is understandably a big deal for the recipients’ family and friends, who can take free tours of the Harrison house afterward, but it also attracts journalists and other spectators. The Manuels’ comments are expected to touch on the privileges and responsibilities of citizenship as well as their personal story; Wilmara was born in Haiti and later became a U.S. citizen.

More information is available here.

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On the air: CAC director on lifelong activity

Miller

Miller

Dr. Ellen Miller, executive director of UIndy’s Center for Aging & Community, is a panelist for today’s episode of No Limits, the WFYI radio public-affairs show.

The topic is “lifelong learning” in the broad sense, exploring the many options for remaining intellectually and socially engaged as we grow older.

The program airs at 1 p.m. on 90.1 FM and online at www.wfyi.org/listen-now. The program will be available for later listening at www.wfyi.org/programs/no-limits.

Learn more about CAC’s work for older adults here. Dr. Miller also serves as UIndy’s interim associate provost for Research, Graduate Programs and Academic Partnerships.

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Theatre Department announces new season

A musical comedy and a revamped Greek tragedy are among the highlights of the 2014-2015 season recently announced by UIndy’s Department of Theatre.

Admission to most productions is free for UIndy students, faculty and staff. New this year for the general public is the addition of a Half-Price Second Thursday performance for all non-musical productions, with tickets priced at just $6. Tickets may be reserved through the Event Ticketing Center by visiting www.uindy.edu/arts/ETC or calling (317) 788-3251. Most productions include adult themes that some may find inappropriate for younger viewers.

The upcoming productions are:

Urinetown: The Musical
Music and lyrics by Mark Hollmann; book and lyrics by Greg Kotis
8 p.m. Oct. 17-18 and 23-25; 2 p.m. Oct. 19
Ransburg Auditorium, Esch Hall
Admission: $12 general; $10 for alumni, seniors, groups of eight or more, and non-UIndy students with ID
Free preview: 8 p.m. Oct. 16

Urinetown-Color-Logo-(large)One of the most uproariously funny musicals in recent years – and winner of three Tony Awards, including Best Book and Score – Urinetown is a tale of greed, corruption, love and revolution in a time when water is worth its weight in gold. In a Gotham-like city, a terrible water shortage caused by a 20-year drought has led to a government-enforced ban on private toilets. The citizens must use public amenities, regulated by a single malevolent company that profits by charging admission for one of humanity’s most basic needs. Among the people, a hero decides he’s had enough, and plans a revolution to lead them all to freedom.

Read more »

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Athletic Training profs earn national honors

Two faculty members from UIndy’s Athletic Training Program are receiving national awards today at the National Athletic Trainers’ Association’s 65th Clinical Symposia & AT Expo here in Indianapolis.

Professor Christine Lauber and Assistant Professor Scott Lawrance each will receive the NATA’s 2014 Athletic Trainer Service Award, which recognizes involvement in professional associations, community organizations, grassroots public relations efforts and service as volunteer athletic trainers. Candidates must be NATA members and hold the certified athletic trainer (ATC) credential for at least 15 years.

Lauber

Lauber

Dr. Lauber, an Indianapolis resident, is director of the UIndy Athletic Training Program. She holds a Master of Arts in Exercise Science from Central Michigan University, an Educational Specialist degree in Higher Education Leadership from Marshall University and a Doctor of Education degree in Educational Leadership from West Virginia University. Previous honors have included the 2013 Great Lakes Athletic Trainers’ Association Educator of the Year Award, the Indiana Athletic Trainers’ Association President’s Excellence Award, the University of Indianapolis Faculty Achievement Award and the School of Education Teacher of the Year Award.

Lawrance

Lawrance

Dr. Lawrance, a Plainfield resident, is the program’s clinical education coordinator and also a UIndy alumnus, having earned his Master of Science and Doctor of Health Sciences degrees in Physical Therapy from the university. His previous honors have included the 2009 Indiana Clinical Athletic Trainer of the Year Award and the 2010 Sports Medicine-Rehabilitation Specialist of the Year Award from the National Strength and Conditioning Association, as well as UIndy’s Distinguished Young Alumnus and School of Education Teacher of the Year awards. He is past-president of the Indiana Athletic Trainers’ Association and president-elect of the Great Lakes Athletic Trainers’ Association.

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Coaches selected for new lacrosse program

UIndy took another step toward establishing Indiana’s first NCAA Division II lacrosse program today, announcing the hiring of two coaches to lead the men’s and women’s teams.

Stocks

Stocks

Married just a few weeks ago, Greg Stocks and Jillian Howley will be UIndy’s very first lacrosse head coaches, Stocks for the men and Howley for the women. They hail from Lake Erie College in suburban Cleveland, where they have served as head coaches.

The pair will have a year to recruit and build a staff before beginning NCAA Division II competition in Spring 2016.

“We are extremely excited to welcome Jillian and Greg as our head lacrosse coaches, not only because of their successful coaching backgrounds, but also because they are a great fit for the University of Indianapolis,” said Sue Willey, UIndy’s vice president for intercollegiate athletics. “Their passion for their sport, team-player attitude and desire to establish a positive experience for our student-athletes makes them a perfect fit for UIndy.”

Howley

Howley

A native of Long Island, N.Y., Howley became a first-time head coach in August 2011, guiding Lake Erie to a 30-23 record in three seasons. She led LEC to back-to-back runner-up finishes in the Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletics Conference regular-season standings, as well as consecutive GLIAC Tournament semifinal appearances.

“I feel like the stars are aligning for us, actually,” she said. “UIndy has such a strong athletics department from top to bottom, and I’m thrilled to be a part of it. Also, starting an NCAA lacrosse program has been a goal of mine since helping build a new program as a student-athlete.”

After being a four-year starter on both the women’s lacrosse and field hockey teams at Division I Robert Morris University in Pennsylvania, Howley had stints as an assistant on D-II staffs at Bloomburg and Mercyhurst universities, as well as a number of club teams.

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Historian: WWI tensions echo in today’s world

Sondhaus

Sondhaus

Saturday marks the 100th anniversary of the spark that ignited the first truly global military conflict, and despite the passage of time, many current international crises can be linked to the chain of events we now call World War I, a University of Indianapolis historian and author says.

Tensions unleashed by the June 28, 1914, assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand still linger behind key foreign policy dilemmas the United States faces today, says Lawrence Sondhaus, professor and chair of UIndy’s Department of History & Political Science.

Sondhaus book“The dynamics are eerily similar,” says Sondhaus, whose 12 books on military history include 2011’s World War I: The Global Revolution and a new tome, The Great War at Sea, both from Cambridge University Press. He specializes in European perspectives on the war and will serve as keynote speaker at an October anniversary conference sponsored by the Austrian and Serbian governments.

The current sectarian strife in Iraq, Sondhaus notes, echoes the challenges the United Kingdom faced a century ago while trying to manage a territory carved from remnants of the defeated Ottoman Empire. Struggling Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Al Maliki, a compromise candidate the United States hoped could keep the nation together, comes from the same local clan with whom the British negotiated when they occupied the country, then known as Mesopotamia, at the end of World War I.

“They had to cut deals to pacify people,” Sondhaus says. “Ninety years later, the U.S. had to do the same thing.”

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