Community Health Network selected as sports medicine healthcare provider for UIndy Athletics

INDIANAPOLIS – The University of Indianapolis announced today the selection of Community Health Network as the provider of sports medicine healthcare for the University’s athletics program, expanding the current partnership between the two entities while creating a unique model for healthcare, education and athletic training in higher education. The partnership also expands opportunities for research, education and access to healthcare for UIndy employees and students.

One of the largest providers of sports medicine healthcare in central Indiana, Community Health Network has developed a standout reputation with professional teams such as the Indy Eleven and Indy Fuel. Community will provide nearly 700 student athletes with the same expertise and quality in sports medicine and athletic training.

“When we looked to a provider that could be an innovative and effective partner and best serve one of the strongest athletic programs in Division II, Community’s expertise and record stood out. With Community’s reputation for excellence in healthcare, integration of ground-breaking technology and medical specialties such as sports medicine, we both saw the opportunity to a create a model in higher education to benefit the entire UIndy community,” said Robert L. Manuel, University of Indianapolis president.

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“We are excited to deepen our current relationship with UIndy through the addition of sports medicine services,” said Nichole Wilson, vice president of retail services for Community Health Network. “The ability to leverage our organizations’ collective strengths to innovate how future health care providers are trained and how we deliver care is what makes this a great partnership. Sports medicine is another avenue by which we can do just that.”

The unique partnership expands access to athletic trainers, diagnostic and treatment services including physical and occupational therapy, orthopedics, women’s health and concussion rehabilitation. With the focus on urgent and emergent medical management, the partnership will provide faculty and students with additional teaching, research and educational opportunities for healthcare majors, including collaborative networking with Community professionals.

“The UIndy Sports Medicine Program provides another outstanding opportunity for Community Health Network to expand on our already unique relationship with the University of Indianapolis,” said Dr. David Kiley, President of Community Health Network’s South region. “This program enables Community Health Network to further our Mission, Vision and Values in the community by providing exceptional Sports Medicine care and experiences to an extraordinary group of student athletes while also collaborating with the University of Indianapolis in providing exceptional healthcare-related learning experiences for their impressive student body. We feel this collaborative relationship will strengthen the learning experiences for the UIndy students and that these remarkable individuals will go on to be deeply committed to enhancing the health and well-being for those in the communities in which they later serve.”

The sports medicine healthcare agreement with Community Health Network is the latest stage in the evolution of a growing partnership, which includes the Nursing Academy, an academic partnership between Community and the University of Indianapolis that offers an accelerated path for students to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. Additionally, the Health Pavilion hosts an annual Multidisciplinary Symposium that brings together hundreds of Community health professionals and University of Indianapolis students and faculty to share research and presentations on the latest healthcare trends.

The goal shared by Community Health Network and the University is to keep our student athletes healthy, and when they do get injured, we support their desire to return to optimum health and competition as soon as possible,” said Sue Willey, University of Indianapolis vice president of intercollegiate athletics.

 

 

About Community Health Network

Headquartered in Indianapolis, Community Health Network has been deeply committed to the communities it serves since opening its first hospital, Community Hospital East, in 1956. Now with more than 16,000 caregivers and 200 sites of care, Community Health Network puts patients first while offering a full continuum of healthcare services, world-class innovations and a new focus on population health management. Exceptional care, simply delivered, is what sets Community Health Network apart and what makes it a leading not-for-profit healthcare destination in central Indiana. For more information about Community Health Network, please visit eCommunity.com.

 

About the University of Indianapolis

The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private, liberal arts university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. UIndy is ranked among the top Midwest Universities by the U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of more than 5,500 undergraduates, 1,300 graduate students and 400 continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100 undergraduate degrees, more than 35 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. With strong programs in the health sciences, engineering, business and education, UIndy impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” UIndy.edu

About University of Indianapolis Athletics
The University of Indianapolis sponsors 23 varsity sports and supports nearly 700 student-athletes. The Greyhounds combined to win a school-record nine conference titles in 2017-18, with 12 consecutive top-20 finishes in the prestigious Learfield Directors’ Cup standings, including six top 10s in the last seven years. The University has noted 73 Academic All-America® honorees since 2000, fifth most in Division II. The overall GPA for student athletes during the 2017-18 academic year was 3.2.

Wanderlust: Spring Break style

Students embarked on educational & service-learning trips during Spring Break. Here’s a look at some of their adventures and lessons learned along the way:

Savannah, Georgia

Six students from the Student Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) made the 12-hour drive to help Coastal Empire Habitat For Humanity for the second consecutive year. They gained muscle mass and so much more during the service-learning experience.

“This year’s trip was special because we helped build a house for a woman and her son. She was a veteran who served in Iraq, and it meant a lot to give back to someone who sacrificed everything so we can live in this wonderful country,” said Alyssa Goen ‘20 (sports marketing), who planned and participated in the 2017 and 2018 trips.

Activities included nailing sheaths to the frame of the house, adding trusses to the roof and working in the ReStore, where they unloaded truckloads of donated furniture and household items and prepared them for resale.

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“This trip was such a humbling experience. It was so rewarding to see how our hard work moved the house further along in the construction process. Meeting the homeowner really opened our eyes to how just a week’s worth of work made such an impact in her life,” said Olivia Vormohr ‘19 (finance), who was an integral part of making the trip a reality.

 

India

Students from the Politics in South Asia class visited India for a closer look at Indian economy and society. Led by Milind Thakar, associate professor of international relations, and Paul Levesque, assistant professor of German, a dozen students traveled to the capital city of Delhi, the southern state of Kerala and other cities and towns to experience the contrasts between India’s wealth and poverty, as well as the country’s ethnic, religious and linguistic diversity.

India spring break trip

Melissa Kapsalis ’18 (political science and psychology with pre-law concentration) said she was impressed with how the trip managed to encompass so many aspects of Indian culture and life in a short time span.

“India is a little bit of everything. It has wealth, poverty, religion, beauty, destruction, and it could change each time you cross the street,” Kapsalis said.

Hong Kong and Vietnam

A group of 19 students, faculty, staff and alumni involved in the MBA program visited Hong Kong and Vietnam to explore business relations in those countries. Many of the students who participated in the trip were members of the MBA 652 Global Business Seminar class taught by Kathy Bohley, Professor of International Business & Marketing.

Students had a business meeting in Hong Kong with Fidelity Investments, then traveled to Ho Chi Minh in Vietnam for a cultural tour, including a day trip to the Cu Chi tunnels, the Reunification Palace, the War Remnants Museum and the Mekong Delta, where they learned about the rice paper industry and other manufacturing in Vietnam. They also met with Intel Products leadership and toured Intel’s manufacturing facility, and met with the U.S. Commercial Services to discuss American business in Vietnam with a commercial officer. 

Jamaica

A small group of students teamed up with Intercollegiate YMCA and four other schools for a service trip to Mandeville, Jamaica where they volunteered at the Hanbury Home for Children. It was the first time Isabel Tintera ‘20 (criminal justice) had been out of the country, but that didn’t interfere with her excitement.

“Kids have always had a soft spot in my heart, so I was eager to hang out with them and hopefully impact their lives in a positive way. The experience was remarkable,” she said.

Jamaica spring break trip

Danielle Hendricks ‘18 (social work) hadn’t been involved in a service trip before, but said she was excited for the chance to get outside her comfort zone.

“I hope I impacted the children in the orphanage and made their day brighter than usual,” she said.

 

Scotland

Students from the Scottish Literature class spent the week across the pond, visiting sites related to this semester’s readings, including the home of Sir Walter Scott (after having read his novel Waverley) and the Isles of Mull and Iona, which are referenced in Robert Louis Stevenson’s novel Kidnapped.

“Having the opportunity to visit and explore the landscapes that inspired these authors really helped me and my classmates connect with the readings and heighten the level of our in-class discussions,” said Kara Wagoner ’19 (finance, professional writing). “In addition to all of the beautiful places we visited, I also enjoyed drinking delicious tea every morning and getting to know our bus driver, David, who had a wealth of knowledge to share with us.”

Scotland trip

Talk about a hands-on approach to learning!

 

Interested in service-learning opportunities? Learn more.

Interested in study abroad opportunities? Learn more.

University of Indianapolis launches leadership program for high school sophomores

INDIANAPOLIS – The University of Indianapolis is launching a leadership development program for Indiana high school sophomores next month with a statewide discussion that will bring together more than 275 high school sophomores from around the region with interests in technology, business, environment and sports.

The event, “Embracing the Future,” hosted by University of Indianapolis Visiting Fellow and former Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard, will promote leadership skills by encouraging students to embrace change in a positive way; and is one of series of initiatives throughout the year designed to prepare the next generation of Indiana’s leaders. Students who attend will have been nominated by their high schools.

“Learning to deal with change and not being afraid of failure are essential leadership qualities that are crucial to successful careers and lives,” Ballard said. “This event is designed to raise awareness of these issues as students consider potential careers and the impact they want to have on the world.”

The sessions focus on influential leaders from a variety of local industries. Topics include the “Future of Sports,” “Innovation,” “Fail Fest: Celebrating Failure’s Role in Innovation” and “Oil and National Security.”

In addition to “Embracing the Future,” University initiatives such as the Lugar Academy encourage high school students to pursue skills in leadership and service. Retired Sen. Richard Lugar, who has hosted the Richard G. Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow’s Leaders on campus for more than 40 years, works with students to identify the most pressing current events and political issues of our time.

Ballard, the former two-term Republican mayor of Indianapolis,  now serves as a Visiting Fellow for the Institute for Civic Leadership and Mayoral Archives at the University of Indianapolis. He mentors students and creates programming to help them develop leadership and civic management skills.

The goal of the Institute is to connect the community with Indianapolis’ civic history by working closely with previous mayors and their staffs to collect and preserve photos, documents and other resources that were critical in establishing Indianapolis as a world-class city. The Mayoral Archives are available digitally at uindy.historyit.com. The Institute hosts the annual Richard M. Fairbanks Symposium on Civic Leadership each year at the University, at which civic leaders and community builders examine a topic important to the future growth of the city.

Nomination details

Teachers and administrators are encouraged to nominate three outstanding sophomore students from their respective high schools who have an interest in technology, business, sports or the environment. Click here to submit nominations. All successful nominees will be contacted in February.

Ballard will deliver a keynote address, and students may choose to attend two afternoon sessions that touch on topics important to their personal and professional futures. The “Embracing the Future” event will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. , Saturday, March 3, in the Ransburg Auditorium of Esch Hall, 1400 E. Hanna Ave.

Learn more about the event.

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UIndy expands summer camp options

Camps like “Drone Mission Mania,” “Ultimate Obstacle Courses,” and “Superhero Missions” are just a few examples of the exciting new summer camps that will be available at the University of Indianapolis in Summer 2018.

Rachelle Merkel Diaz, director of summer programs, said the camps offered by the University stand out from other options across Indianapolis because they are devoted to specific activities, allowing kids to explore an interest at a deeper level.

“When I started working here a few years ago, I heard comments like ‘Oh, I had no idea there were summer camps here,’” Merkel Diaz said. “Now we’re changing the conversation to ‘what camps do you have this year?’”

The University will offer about 50 summer camp options in 2018, and registration is now available. Programs are geared toward kids ages six to eighteen and usually last four to five days.

More than 1,000 kids attended a summer camp at the University in 2017, and that number is expected to continue to grow.

“We’re also seeing students return for multiple sessions. It’s nice to see them come back, because it tells us they’re really enjoying the experiences,” she added.

Merkel Diaz said summer programs are important for the University because they help the community become more familiar and more engaged with the campus. Additionally, a busy campus all year long helps to support retail businesses in the neighborhood.

“By expanding what we’re doing in the summer, we’re building relationships with students early on,” she said. “Hopefully they want to come back again, not just in the summer, but as future students.”

Beyond 2018, the vision is to continue growing University offerings to include more science and arts camps and to expand the interest areas to draw in a wider range of participants, Merkel Diaz said.

“We would like to continue broadening partnerships with community schools and organizations to re-engage the south side and promote the University as a resource hub for unique and interesting events all year long,” she added.

 

New opportunities in 2018 include:

  • An engineering camp will introduce campers to hands-on experience with designing, building and racing their own radio-controlled cars. Students in grades 9 – 12 will work on the project using computer-aided designs, 3D printing and laser cutting technology. 
  • A variety of drone-themed camps. The University is partnering with Drobots instructors, who will lead a variety of day camps for kids in grades 3 – 5 and grades 6 – 8 who are interested in learning to fly drones. Find details about drone camps here.
  • Overnight team camps for high school soccer, women’s basketball and men’s basketball players. Teams will have the opportunity to stay overnight in the residence halls for several days, be mentored by college athletes and get feedback from University coaches.
  • A camp for high school students interested in learning about the field of physical therapy. The program will be hosted by MICI-AHEC on the University’s campus and include several field trips. See camp details.

 

Returning favorites in 2018 include:

  • Grand Camp, a camp with cross-generational activities for grandparents and grandkids to enjoy together. Learn more.
  • Theatre camp “From Story to Stage,” which allows campers to get hands-on experience with playwriting, acting, costume design and more.
  • The 24th annual Piano Camp, designed for beginners and intermediate students age 7 – 12. The weeklong day camp ends with a recital in Ruth Lilly Performance Hall for family and friends to enjoy.
  • STEM camps like Math Beyond Numbers (for grades 6 – 8) and Radical Robotics, a partnership with Center Grove High School that allows their robotics club to host on-campus activities that are open to the general public. 

 

See a complete list of 2018 summer camp options.

IndyGo to Host Red Line Transit Discussion on Campus

IndyGo will host a Transit Talk open house at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 30 on the University of Indianapolis campus to answer questions and give updates about the Red Line rapid transit project and other upcoming improvements.

A Red Line station is expected to open in 2019 near the University campus along Shelby Street, just north of Hanna Avenue.It will be one of 28 stops along the initial 13-mile route. Electric-powered, wifi-equipped buses will pick up passengers every 10 minutes, from 5 a.m. to 1 a.m., every day of the year.

Construction of the IndyGo’s Red Line also was a key improvement recommended from an intense neighborhood study conducted as part  of the South Indy Quality of Life Plan. The University has been one of the anchor organizations supporting these efforts.

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Having the Red Line on campus will support neighborhood growth and better connect students to downtown activities and additional networking opportunities. The University is a major employer on the south side and hosts more than 200 cultural attractions and events each year. In addition to providing more access to campus, the Red Line also will help students and residents in the area connect to downtown and other destination points across the city.

Traffic impacts on the south side are expected to be minimal, according to the IndyGo website.

IndyGo Transit Talk
6 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 30
Schwitzer Student Center, University of Indianapolis
1400 E. Hanna Ave.

The Jan. 30 event is one of nine upcoming Transit Talks that will be hosted around the city of Indianapolis in early 2018, around the same time that Red Line construction will begin.

See the full list of upcoming Transit Talks.

 

University connects with international alumni in China

China Nov 2017The University of Indianapolis has connections in China, Brazil, Turkey and beyond that allow for the exchange of faculty members and students and other collaborative activities.

Through accredited partnerships with Chinese institutions, more than 1,200 Chinese students have achieved a University degree and about 200 students are pursuing degrees now, spending at least one year in Indianapolis. The program offers students from both countries the opportunity to pair their education with a cultural experience that will last a lifetime.

In November 2017, the University strengthened its connections in China by establishing the Chinese Student Alumni Association and hosting several student engagement events in China.

Three University employees: Executive Vice President & Provost Stephen Kolison, Associate Provost for International Engagement Jodie Ferise and Associate Vice President for International Partnerships Phylis Lin traveled to China, visiting four cities and hosting three events during their time abroad. Students and alumni from Ningbo Institute of Technology and Zhejiang Yuexiu University of Foreign Languages in Shaoxing attended.

“Our two joint programs in China (NIT & ZYU) have enhanced the University’s internationalization since 2004,” Lin said. “These two programs have also enhanced diversity on campus.”

“It’s important to remind someone half a world away that they’re still part of our UIndy community,” Ferise said. “These trips make sure there are touchpoints for students and graduates and allow us to continue building relationships.”

The group hosted the first-ever Alumni Day in Hangzhou, along with two UIndy Days for current students in Ningbo and Shaoxing. At each event, students shared their experiences, participated in social activities like tea ceremonies and music recitals and learned about news from the University. It was a chance to celebrate and network with current and former students and to make personal connections that wouldn’t be possible otherwise.

“It was very moving to hear the alumni stories,” Ferise said. “Every single one of them harkened back to their time and credited the University for where they are now. As professors, we want to think the things we put out in the universe matter, and this was proof they do.”

The exchange programs in China have been a pivotal part of the University’s international engagement portfolio for more than a decade, with plans in place for continued growth in the years ahead. Seven University of Indianapolis professors are now teaching at Chinese institutions.

As the faculty advisor for the program, Lin has been working hard to increase the University’s visibility in China, sending marketing materials for display and making five to six trips to China each year.

“The most vibrant universities are those that have living, breathing communities of people who remain connected to them,” Ferise said. “Opportunities for networking, student internships, future student employment and enhanced campus diversity – that’s what we want.”

The next trip to China is slated for March 2018.

Alumnus designs Good Hall model for 2017 holiday card

Visual communication design graduate Daniel Del Real ’05 offered his creative talents for this year’s University of Indianapolis holiday card.

Daniel Del RealGood Hall was an easy subject choice for Del Real—it’s where he held his first public art show during his senior year and he attended classes there every semester as a student as well.

“UIndy has managed to keep that tradition going today,” Del Real said. “All students are still going into this building for classes during their time on campus.”

While designing the card, Del Real built a scale model of Good Hall and adorned the building with miniature holiday decorations, ribbons on the columns and artificial snow. He even provided lighting on the inside of the model. He said he drew his inspiration from a card he received from a friend depicting a Christmas village. Once the model was finished, he photographed it for the University’s holiday card.

“It’s really wonderful to give back to the University,” Del Real said. “My fours years at UIndy were some of the best years of my life. So, to see that it has come full circle, I was glad to create this for UIndy.”

Del Real explained his biggest challenge was getting the proportions right. To do this, he said he measured the windows on several images provided by the University to assign a scale for each detail of the building, including the bricks, molding, columns and steps. Watch this short video to hear about his creative process.  

Because renovations are underway to restore Good Hall’s two-story portico and six columns at the main entrance, Del Real said, “this is an opportunity for incoming students to really see the potential of the building with the portico.”

The scale model of Good Hall will be on display at the Krannert Memorial Library following the holiday break.

Del Real is the resident artist at the International Marketplace Coalition, working to forge relationships between businesses, community and artists through public art programs and installations that enrich the International Marketplace neighborhood on Indy’s northwest side.

He received the University’s Distinguished Young Alumni Award at the Honors & Recognition Dinner in September. He also partnered with current students to create greyhound vignettes that were on display at that Homecoming event.

December 2017 graduation: Josie Seach

josieseachJosie Seach is continuing a family tradition by attending the University of Indianapolis, with a major in literary studies and a minor in computer science. Her mother and grandmother both graduated from the University, and Josie will follow in their footsteps in December 2017. We talked with her about her plans after graduation and how her campus experiences (including her work with the University’s Marketing & Communications Department) prepared her to take the next step.

Q. What’s next after graduation?

A. I’m particularly interested in using digital marketing tools to assist nonprofits, especially those related to the arts, technology, and literacy. Long-term, I hope to either continue on this path or obtain a Master of Library and Information Science or Master’s in Human-Computer Interaction and find work that allows me to help with others’ literacy, both traditional verbal literacy and information/technology literacy.

Q. I heard that you will get some recognition from Etchings magazine! Could you tell me a little more about that?

A. Yes, I submitted three poems, and all three were selected for publication. This is my first time being published anywhere, and also my first time getting into Etchings. I’ve submitted art and other pieces in the past that were not selected. I had hoped to get into the magazine before graduating, and I’m glad to have gotten the chance to see that wish through. I wrote and refined the poems with the help of a workshop class, and it’s fulfilling to see that work recognized.

Q. Tell me about your experience working in the UIndy communications and marketing department.

A. Working for this department has given me the insight and tools I’ll need to succeed in other marketing or writing jobs, and I now feel confident in applying for these sorts of positions, not only because of the wonderful opportunity to work in marketing, but also because of the numerous other opportunities I’ve had, like editing for Etchings and tutoring in the Writing Lab. I was able to attend an academic conference and present one of my literary research papers. Another class gave me the freedom to research something I believe could be used practically—I studied an informal, online community of librarians, and used this precedent to launch research on ways a library might be able to utilize social media to reach and assist patrons.

Q. Was there anyone at UIndy who mentored you?

A. My department has gone above and beyond helping me succeed. Every professor has been so supportive, even before I declared a major in the English department. I want to especially thank Dr. (Molly) Martin and Dr. (Jennifer) Camden for working with me to form a plan when I realized that a class I needed to graduate conflicted with a class for my minor, as well as when I later realized that I needed to add a class to fulfill an elective requirement. Had they not been so generous with their assistance, I would have needed to wait another semester to graduate.

Q. Looking back on your time at UIndy, do you have any advice for incoming freshmen?

A. I think a lot of freshmen worry about their futures when they begin college, especially those who haven’t decided on a major yet. There’s a debate on whether to pick something lucrative or to pick something you love; I feel there doesn’t need to be a mutual exclusion there. Pick something you’re good at and interested in, and there will be ways to apply what you learn. Give yourself time to figure out your strengths, play those strengths up, and work with the University to find opportunities to apply your skills and education.

 

Read about other 2017 December graduates.

Learn about 2017 December graduation

Meet the December 2017 graduates!

About 150 students will walk in the first formal winter commencement ceremony on Saturday, December 16 in Ransburg Auditorium. Indiana Rep. Andre Carson will deliver the keynote speech and the program will be streamed online at uindy.edu/graduation.

Click on the photos below to learn about some of the December graduates, and what’s next for each of them.

December 2017 Graduation: Meet Jason Marshall

jasonmarshallChances are you’ve seen Jason Marshall ’17 (political science, legal studies minor, pre-law concentration) around campus. He’s president of Indianapolis Student Government and the Pre-Law Student Association (as well as precinct committeeman for Spiceland’s second district–his hometown!)

Q. What groups or activities have you been involved in on campus?

A. I have participated as a Greyhound Ambassador for the Admissions Office, a member of the Student Athlete Advisory Committee, served two years as Indianapolis Student Government president and created the Pre-Law Student Association, where I have served for two years as president. Not only have these experiences been fun, but being involved on campus helped me to understand what my passions are and have helped me develop a true sense of service. Being the student body president has given me the opportunity to give back to a school that has offered so much to me, and I hope what I have done benefits current and future Greyhounds!

Q. Could you talk about your internships and how they helped you develop your professional skills?

A. I began my first internship as a freshman with the Marion County Democratic Party, where I gained valuable office and professional skills in communication and programming. Following that internship, I began to work with Hannah News Service Midwest as a senior intern tracking legislation at the Indiana Statehouse and gained fundamental skills and knowledge in the workings of the state government and working with clients in a professional manner. This past summer I interned in Washington, D.C., for Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-IN) where I gained knowledge in federal government and valuable skills in research and writing.

Q. What are your plans after graduation?

A. Following graduation, I will be an office manager for Hannah News Service during session at the Statehouse and will then continue my education in fall 2018 at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

Q. Is there anyone at UIndy who influenced or helped you during your academic career?

A. The faculty and staff are great mentors and always supportive of the students. [Dean of Students] Kory Vitangeli and President [Rob] Manuel work diligently for the students, and they have been awesome in supporting student government and the student body. Dr. David Root (political science) and Dr. Laura Wilson (political science) are incredible professors with fun classes and are always ready to help students.

Q. Why would you recommend the political science program?

A. The political science department is by far an excellent program, and I highly recommend the program to anyone interested in any form of government. The professors are personable and always ready to assist students with classwork, but also to find internships and careers that fit the students.

Q. What would your advice be to incoming freshmen?

A. My advice to any incoming freshman is to become involved on campus and in the city. The friendships, skills and networks you gain early on will become so vital in anything you pursue. Getting involved is a fun way to spend your time outside of class doing something you enjoy! Also, get your readings done!

Q. Final thoughts before graduation?

A. UIndy has been an incredible school for me, both intellectually and socially. I feel, as I leave, that I am well prepared to pursue my goals, and UIndy has put me in a position to do so.

 

Read about other 2017 December graduates.

Learn about 2017 December graduation

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