Research events highlight UIndy-Community Health Network partnership

The University of Indianapolis held the first annual Health Pavilion Scholarship Day in May to showcase research conducted by students and faculty in the health sciences disciplines. Held in tandem with the Community Health Network Research Symposium on campus, the events highlighted the growing partnership between the University of Indianapolis and Community Health Network.

UIndy students show research posters in the atrium of the Health Pavilion as part of the first annual Health Pavilion Scholarship Day hosted by the Health Science Colleges on Friday, May 19, 2017. The event was followed by the Second Annual Multidisciplinary Scholarly Activity Symposium held by Community Health Network with UIndy partnership support. Chad Priest, RN, JD, Chief Executive Officer of he American Red Cross of Indiana Region, is the speaker delivering a keynote on "The Healthcare Professionals of the Future" in Schwitzer following the luncheon. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

More than 20 faculty and students showcased their research experiences  at the Scholarship Day event held in the morning, which was hosted by all of the disciplines within the Health Pavilion. In the afternoon, keynote speakers Chad Priest and Ileana Ponce-Gonzalez of Community Health Network addressed issues surrounding the health care professions at the Community Health Network Research Symposium.

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Rachel Gravens ’18: A heart for community

Rachel Gravens '18

Rachel Gravens ’18

Rachel Gravens ’18 is a double major in anthropology of health, and studio art with a concentration in ceramics. Her minor is environmental sustainability. She completed internships with Big Car Collaborative and Mad Farmers Collective, and traveled to Texas as part of the cultural anthropology team that accompanied the University of Indianapolis Forensics Team for the Beyond Borders project.

Q. What are your plans after graduation?

A. I plan to work in the nonprofit sector with organizations that promote the arts for community building and development. I am also interested in the food system and would love to be involved with organizations in that sphere as well. Eventually I plan to enroll in a graduate program. During this time I would like to continue to work and develop as a ceramics artist, and I hope to one day have my own studio and be able to teach classes.

Q. How did your work on the Beyond Borders project help prepare you for your future career?

A. My time in Texas and the subsequent research, analysis, and presentations had a number of positive effects on my academic development. This was my first experience “in the field” as an anthropology student. I got to experience traveling to another place, observing and participating with a number of groups and organizations, taking jottings, and writing up field notes at the end of each day. I loved the whole process and it has further established my love for anthropology and what we do. I also enjoyed coding the notes and forming a poster to present to different audiences. It was exciting to share my experience and what I learned, as well as demonstrate the value of anthropological work to other students, faculty, and UIndy donors.

In addition, the trip had very personal impact on me, as I saw firsthand the reality of mass migrant deaths at our border. I was convinced of the fact that this is a humanitarian crisis and that real change must take place. This requires raising awareness so that people are cognizant of this tragedy and inspired to take action. My experience in south Texas motivates me to share what I know and encourage others to educate themselves about the reality of the situation.

As a double major with a minor, I have been able to take a wide variety of classes that have each shaped my college experience and who I am. Art has pushed me to work hard, problem solve, think creatively, believe in my abilities, and take pride in my craftsmanship and accomplishments. In anthropology I have grown in my ability to think critically and to see and evaluate the world in new ways. Anthropology has also helped be to develop as a writer and speaker. Environmental sustainability has incorporated my love for nature in my studies, and helped me to draw connections between our human actions and our environment. All of these skills and lessons will be carried with me into my professional life and continue to help me grow and be successful.  

Slideshow: Meet the Class of 2018!

Q. Were you involved in any extracurricular activities as a student?

A. My freshman year I participated in intramural volleyball and it was a great way to make friends and take a break from school work. I was also very active in Circle K, which is a volunteer group on campus. I was also a member of the Art and Design Student Association (ADSA). I was very active in my junior year and helped to plan and run events. The art department is full of wonderful people with a lot of great ideas, and I loved being able to work with them to make exciting things happen on campus.

My junior year I was an intern at Big Car Collaborative, an art and place-making organization in the Garfield Park neighborhood. Working with such fun and creative people who use art as a tool for development and community building in their neighborhood is part of what has inspired me to work with similar nonprofits in my career. More recently, I was an intern for the Mad Farmers Collective. I helped with the day-to-day tasks on the farm and learned about the operations of an urban farm working to improve their community. Because of my love for the outdoors, gardening, and the food system I really enjoyed this opportunity and learned so much. In addition I have been a tutor in the Math Lab on campus, assisting students with introductory math courses and statistics.

Q. Were there any faculty, staff or fellow students who helped you during your time as a student at UIndy? 

A. The Art and Design department is a very supportive network of faculty and students. The students are a great encouragement to each other and the professors pour a lot into the development and well-being of their students.

Katherine Fries has been a wonderful force in the department and I am thankful for her enthusiasm and direction during my foundational art classes at UIndy. She has also pushed to make the students more involved in the department and has helped to facilitate some great events.

Barry Barnes has been my advisor and professor in ceramics and his belief in me has been amazing. He encouraged me from the very beginning to stick with ceramics and has admired my hard work, creativity, and dedication to ceramics.

Additionally, Dr. Alyson O’Daniel has been a big influence on my college career. She’s always been willing to talk things over with me, including my options and next steps after college. Her dynamic courses have challenged me and her support has been extremely helpful. Through her courses I have come to have a much better understanding of and love for anthropology. She also invited me to be her research assistant for the migrant death project and I am so thankful for that opportunity.

New community garden project at University of Indianapolis enhances healthy options for neighborhood

Community gardenWith gloves and shovels in hand, volunteers got to work on a community garden on the University of Indianapolis campus, with the goal of bringing access to fresh produce to the surrounding neighborhood. The UIndy and CHNw Community Garden (Serve360°) project is part of an ongoing partnership between the University of Indianapolis and Community Health Network to provide health- and wellness-related opportunities to the Indianapolis southside.

The garden is located on the west side of the United Methodist Church at 4002 Otterbein Ave. From 1 to 5 p.m. on Friday, April 20, volunteers from the University of Indianapolis, Community Hospital South, Purdue Extension and South Indy Quality of Life Plan cleaned nine raised garden beds, glued the bed’s cement blocks, shoveled and spread dirt, pulled weeds, and did some planting. 

“We know that social determinants, like a lack of access to nutritious food, can affect overall health and well-being,” said Priscilla Keith, Executive Director of Community Benefit for Community Health Network. “We are proud to work with our partners at UIndy to offer this pilot program which will not only provide access to fresh and affordable food; but educate students and those living in neighborhoods around the UIndy campus how to start and maintain their own gardens.  Our goal is to find ways to reach beyond our sites of care to impact the health and the quality of life of the communities we serve.”

Gurinder Hohl, who directs the partnership between the University of Indianapolis and Community Health Network, said the project is highly focused on meeting community needs, including a planning committee that involves local residents. Hohl said food grown in the community garden will be available to community members and gardeners at no cost. While University of Indianapolis students will manage the garden for the first year, Hohl said community members are encouraged to take on leadership roles as the garden becomes a focal point for the neighborhood.

“The location of this garden was chosen based on its proximity to the proposed Red Line station on Shelby Street. The more you decrease access-related issues, the more people will get involved,” Hohl said.

Project planners hope to expand activities to include a farmer’s market, cooking classes, health assessments, musical performances and art displays.

“It’s about placemaking where you try to create opportunities for neighbors to mingle and have access and options related to food and health that they would not otherwise have,” Hohl explained.

The University and Community Hospital South are working in collaboration with the South Indy Quality of Life (QOL) Plan on the garden project, which ties into the Plan’s Health & Wellness initiative (and is one of 173 action steps identified by the Plan to create thriving households and healthy communities in eight neighborhoods on the Indianapolis southside). Michelle Strahl Salinas with the South Indy Quality of Life Plan explained that the Health & Wellness action team aims to bring healthier food options to residents, and to make sure they are accessible, affordable and locally sourced.

“The University of Indianapolis has been very intentional about working with the neighborhoods around the University. We believe that having UIndy as a lead and collaborating partner on our action teams brings us a knowledge base and diversity that we would not have otherwise,” said Salinas, who added that the QOL plan depends on volunteer and partner-led projects like the community garden.

Qualls Video Walls in Health Pavilion enhance on-campus communication

President Rob L. Manuel, left, with Pamela '84 and Edwin Qualls '84.

President Rob L. Manuel, left, with Pamela ’84 and Edwin Qualls ’84.

New video walls, made possible by a generous donation from Edwin ’84 and Pamela Qualls ’84, bring new technology to the University of Indianapolis Health Pavilion to showcase student and faculty achievements.

The state-of-the-art monitors on display in the Health Pavilion atrium contribute to the dynamic ways the University is sharing information across campus. The video walls, which are powered through technology offered by Just Add Power, will be used to highlight student artwork, videos, notifications and emergency messages. Ed Qualls is president of Just Add Power, which specializes in video technology for distributing HDMI® over IP networks.

President Robert L. Manuel said the Health Pavilion was the perfect representation of how learning experiences and spaces have evolved since the University’s inception in 1902.

“Throughout the past nearly 120 years, spaces and modes of teaching and sharing information have changed and never with such speed as in the past 25 years,” Manuel said.

University Board of Trustees members Ed and Pamela Qualls, who met on campus as undergraduates in the 1980s, shared their story of how their experiences at the University of Indianapolis shaped their lives. Pam Qualls explained that she developed a lifelong commitment to education for service at the University.

“We began to realize how formative this university had been for all of us and now with all of our experience in life, we see that’s not something that happens by accident. It’s something that is created. A culture where you learn how to use your gifts to enrich other people’s lives is rare and amazing,” she said.

Qualls2_600Ed Qualls said he hoped the installation of the video walls marked not the completion of a project, but instead “the beginning of an intentional effort to connect every screen on the whole campus together to enhance campus-wide communications.”

The work of students from the arts and engineering disciplines was on display during a recent dedication ceremony. The display also celebrated the heritage of Indiana Central College and the University of Indianapolis with vector-based images of the campus community at different points during the 20th century.

Those maps, created by art & design students working with Randi Frye, assistant professor, will soon be on display in the Sease Wing and during heritage tours on campus.

President Manuel presented the Qualls with the inaugural map representing 1986.

“We hope it reminds you of this very special place that started your journey together and how you both have now impacted the University and our journey,” Manuel said.

Sutphin Center for Clinical Care strengthens community partnerships

Dedication of the Sutphin Center for Clinical Care in the UIndy Health Pavilion on Thursday, August 24, 2017. Program and group photo at the end: Christopher Molloy VP for Advancement was MC with remarks from Stephen Kiley, Senior Vice President South Region for Community Hospitals, Dr. Stephanie Kelly, Dean College of Health Sciences (CHS), Ashley Boyer Mahin, NP '16, a family nurse practitioner, and Charles Sutphin. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Dedication of the Sutphin Center for Clinical Care in the UIndy Health Pavilion on Thursday, August 24, 2017. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

The Sutphin family legacy at the University of Indianapolis ushered in a new chapter with the dedication of the Sutphin Center for Clinical Care in the UIndy Health Pavilion in August 2017.

The Center commemorates Dudley and Mary Louise Sutphin and strengthens the University of Indianapolis’ commitment to building partnerships that create better health outcomes for underserved populations. The Center brings together critical services within the UIndy Health Pavilion, including physical therapy, medical and behavioral health clinics.

The Center, originally located in Fountain Square, will continue the University’s work to combine improved access to health care with advancement of education initiatives in the health professions.

“The Sutphin Center for Clinical Care provides an important place for our students, faculty, and community members to come together. We can extend our applied clinic teaching experiences, and offer support to enhance the health and wellness of our community at the same time,” said University of Indianapolis President Robert L. Manuel.  

By serving multifaceted needs through services such as rehabilitation, health and wellness and mental health, Manuel praised the interprofessional culture that serves as the backbone of the Sutphin Center’s philosophy. Students have the opportunity to work alongside Community Health Network clinicians and to collaborate with students in other health disciplines.

“As educators, we know students learn best in real-life environments, so the addition of the Sutphin Center in space just downstairs from classroom learning is a valuable resource for the UIndy health professions. Students will have opportunities for internships, focused learning activities, interprofessional learning and research that is right at their doorstep,” said Stephanie Kelly, dean of the College of Health Sciences.

Vice President for University Advancement Chris Molloy noted the longstanding relationship between the Sutphins and the University.

“The Sutphin family has been a longtime supporter of the University of Indianapolis in its mission to reach out to the community, and the Center positions the University to continue to make a positive impact,” said Molloy.

The Sutphin family has a long history of supporting the University of Indianapolis beginning with the establishment of the Sutphin Lectures in the Humanities, endowed in memory of Samuel B. Sutphin by his sons Dudley V. and Samuel Reid Sutphin. Charlie Sutphin, who is Dudley’s son and Samuel’s grandson, continues to support both the Sutphin Lectures and the Sutphin Center for Clinical Care.

At a recent dedication ceremony, Charlie Sutphin noted the strong ties between his family and the University. He shared the story of his father receiving an honorary degree in 1992.

“I saw how much that meant to him, and it sustained my ongoing interest in the University of Indianapolis,” Sutphin said.

Sutphin encouraged students to get involved in volunteer or outreach opportunities, noting the value of community connections.

“We should all strive to belong to a group that is greater than ourselves,” Sutphin said.

New Health Pavilion clinics open their doors

UIndy wellness clinicWith some final touches still in the works, the new UIndy Health and Wellness Center was seeing a steady stream of patients Thursday.

Community Health Network staffers include UIndy alumni

This week saw the official opening of two clinical spaces in the new Health Pavilion, where the university is partnering with Community Health Network to provide care for patients and clients while creating experiential learning opportunities for students.

The new Health and Wellness Center in Suite 108, which combines the student and employee services previously available at the Student Health Center and Koval Center, saw its first 30 patients Wednesday, said Kory Vitangeli, Dean of Students and VP for Student & Campus Affairs.

The personnel include staff nurse-practitioners Lynn Moran, Vicky Swank and Barbara Kelly, and the cooperating physician from Community Health Network is Dr. Randall Lee, a 1972 UIndy graduate who is donating his time to the effort. Appointments are free to the UIndy community, with minimal charges for medication, vaccines and other needs. The hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and the menu of services will continue to expand.

Community Health’s Physical Therapy and Rehab-UIndy clinic opened Monday in Suite 107, serving network clients initially on Mondays and Thursdays and soon to expand through the week. Its services include general orthopedic therapy as well as neurological, hand and sports injury rehabilitation. Staffing the space are Community Health Network physical therapists Jeff Mestrich and Matt Redshaw. Mestrich, a certified and licensed athletic trainer, holds two UIndy degrees: a BS in Athletic Training from 2000 and an MS in Physical Therapy from 2002. Redshaw, a certified strength and conditioning specialist, earned his Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from UIndy in 2007.

Also housed in the Health Pavilion is the School of Psychological Sciences‘ Psychological Services Center, where faculty and advanced graduate students provide comprehensive evaluation and outpatient therapy services to individuals, families and organizations.

CHN PT rehab clinicCommunity Health Network’s Physical Therapy and Rehab-UIndy is now open two days a week and soon will expand its hours, offering a range of services.

Partners celebrate Health Pavilion opening

Health Pavilion dedication panorama

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Watch WTTV-CBS4 report

Not one, but four ribbons were cut Friday when hundreds of students, faculty, staff and community partners gathered for the dedication of the UIndy Health Pavilion, a cutting-edge space designed for innovative collaborations among academic disciplines and health care industry professionals.

“We started dreaming about this building about 18 months ago, and in the architects’ rendering, they had this room filled with people,” President Robert Manuel said, glancing around the crowded two-story atrium as onlookers lined the balcony rail. “I don’t believe any of us thought we’d be done in 18 months to be here today, but it’s really pretty powerful to look out and see it done, filled, and doing what it was built to do.”

The four-story, 160,000-square-foot, $28 million structure at Hanna and State avenues now houses UIndy’s nationally respected programs in nursing, psychology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, gerontology, kinesiology, athletic training and social work, The building also houses two clinical facilities opening this month in partnership with Community Health Network: a health and wellness clinic for faculty, staff and students; and the latest addition to CHN’s growing line of Community Physical Therapy & Rehab centers, bringing new services to the University Heights neighborhood.

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Alumni making contributions to health care

Kiley

Kiley

Physician David Kiley, who earned his MBA from UIndy last year, has been named senior vice president and physician executive for Community Health Network‘s North Region. His duties will include working with the region president and with providers across all of the region’s product lines and care sites to implement clinical priorities. Kiley, an OB/GYN, began his career with Community in 1992 and had been serving most recently as vice president of clinical performance for the North Region and a specialty care physician executive for Community Physician Network. Read more here.

Cabel

Cabel

Lillian Cabel, who holds UIndy Master of Science in Nursing degrees in the Family Nurse Practitioner and Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner specialities, is part of a renewed effort to address women’s health issues at Putnam County Hospital in Greencastle. Cabel will begin seeing patients Sept. 8 through the hospital’s Putnam Women’s Healthcare service, which offers obstetric and gynecologic care in partnership with physicians and midwives at Hendricks Regional Health. Read more here.

UIndy, Community Health launch partnership

Health Pavilion exteriorThe UIndy Health Pavilion will open in August at Hanna and State avenues.

Clinic in new UIndy Health Pavilion will serve campus and network patients
while creating new opportunities for education, internships and research

VIDEO: Watch President Manuel and Community Health Network CEO Bryan Mills on Inside Indiana Business

Community Health Network and the University of Indianapolis are joining forces to establish a clinical facility on campus where students and faculty will work alongside health and wellness professionals to serve patients and clients, transforming the educational experience and bringing important resources to an underserved part of the city.

Manuel

Manuel

The partnership is central to the philosophy behind UIndy’s four-story, $30 million Health Pavilion on Hanna Avenue, which will open in August as the new home for nationally respected academic programs in nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, psychology, gerontology, kinesiology, athletic training and social work.

“Our vision is to close the gap between education and practice in a way that benefits our students, our partners and the broader community,” UIndy President Robert Manuel said. “With our friends at Community Health Network sharing that vision, we have an amazing opportunity for innovation in the preparation of new health professionals and the delivery of health and wellness services in our city and beyond.”

Under a renewable five-year lease, more than 10,000 square feet of the UIndy Health Pavilion’s first floor will operate as a department of Community Hospital South. The space will include a 7,000-square-foot physical therapy and rehab center with private treatment rooms and a therapy gym that includes a walking track and therapy equipment.

Adjacent will be a 3,700-square-foot primary care clinic that will provide health and wellness services to UIndy employees, Community Health Network clients and other patients, with examination rooms where students can gain hands-on experience in their chosen fields under the supervision of professionals and faculty. Also on the first floor will be UIndy’s own Psychological Services Center, a training and research facility where faculty and graduate students from the School of Psychological Sciences provide evaluation and therapy services to the public.

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Regional health career center moves to UIndy

MICI-AHEC fits well with university’s strength in health professions

A regional program that recruits and retains healthcare professionals to work in underserved communities has a new home at the University of Indianapolis.

UIndy now hosts the Metropolitan Indianapolis/Central Indiana Area Health Education Center, known as MICI-AHEC, which is active in Marion and the eight surrounding counties. It is one of eight regional AHEC centers around the state dedicated to this special kind of workforce development, which is based on research showing that health professionals tend to serve communities where they grew up and received their training.

“With our School of Nursing, College of Health Sciences and other health-related programs, not to mention our culture of community engagement and service, UIndy is a leader in the field and a natural choice to host this important program,” said Deborah Balogh, executive vice president and provost at UIndy. “We also look forward to integrating this new office with our operations and creating new opportunities for our students and faculty.”

McElroy-Jones

McElroy-Jones

Executive Director Kimberly McElroy-Jones will continue to lead the MICI-AHEC, as she has since its founding in 2006. The office and its seven staff members are located in the Fountain Square Center on Shelby Street, where UIndy shares space with community organizations. The change comes as the university prepares to foster greater multidisciplinary collaboration by moving its schools of nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, psychology and other health-related programs into the new four-story Health Pavilion that is now under construction at the main campus on Hanna Avenue.

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