Artist-in-Residence Drew Petersen creates unique learning opportunities for piano students

Drew Petersen master piano class - February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Drew Petersen master piano class – February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

INDIANAPOLIS – Music students at the University of Indianapolis are reaping the benefits of an artist-in-residence program that connects them with unique learning experiences and a global professional network.

Drew Petersen, 2017 American Pianists Awards winner, Christel DeHaan fellow and University of Indianapolis artist-in-residence, has held masterclasses, private coachings, lectures and performances as part of the partnership between the American Pianists Association and the University.

Petersen returns in October for a performance at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center Oct. 29, followed by master classes throughout the week that serve as a catalyst for students in the University’s music program.

Learn more about the University of Indianapolis Department of Music programs.

Drew Petersen master piano class with UIndy students at CDFAC on the Ruth Lilly Perfomance Hall stage on Wednesday, February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

A cum laude graduate of Harvard University in social sciences, Petersen pursued undergraduate and graduate studies in music at the Juilliard School. He also has been a prizewinner in major international competitions and has been profiled in the New York Times, New York Magazine and the documentary Just Normal.

Petersen said interacting with the talented music students on campus has been one of the biggest rewards of his new connection to the University.

“Whenever I interact with the students and faculty, I am reminded that each day at UIndy is an opportunity to explore great music together and examine and innovate the best ways we can share it with the community. I’ve been having a great time, and I look forward to all that lies ahead,” Petersen said.

Drew Petersen master piano class with UIndy students at CDFAC on the Ruth Lilly Perfomance Hall stage on Wednesday, February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Students also have enjoyed Petersen’s mentorship. During her masterclass with Petersen, Carrie Atkinson ’18 (music – piano) was inspired by his remarkable playing technique and personable approach.

“Drew brought an excitement to the music that was inspiring to see as well as some wonderful insights to the music that reinforced what my teachers had already been instructing me in,” Atkinson said.

Richard Ratliff, professor of music, said Petersen’s fall 2017 performance on campus demonstrated the kind of grace under pressure that he encourages in his students.

“After our week with Drew, students approached the remainder of the semester with energy and enthusiasm. Students now realize that such mastery is a step-by-step process,” Ratliff explained.

Cole Snapp ’18 (music – piano, composition concentration) had a private lesson and a masterclass with Petersen and found both experiences to be motivational.

“Having an amazingly proficient pianist like Drew coach me was extremely valuable. He was able to bring things to my attention that I would not have otherwise thought. In a Zoltan Kodàly piece I was working on, he asked me to play the climactic section louder and louder until I was literally throwing my whole weight into the keys,” Snapp said.

“Since Drew is not much older than our students, his command in public presentation really made an impact. His expertise in a wide variety of repertoire — from the 18th century to the present — was apparent to everyone as he worked with students and spoke insightfully about the music he performs and is planning to record,” Ratliff said.

Atkinson said she’s grateful for the partnership between the APA and the University.

“I think that it is so enriching to get to work with musicians of his calibre. Drew is one of the top pianists on the scene right now, and getting to work with him was a very valuable and fresh experience. The best part, for me, was seeing how excited he got about the music,” she said.

Written by Sara Galer, Senior Communications Specialist, University of Indianapolis. Contact newsdesk@uindy.edu with your campus news.

One on one with Juliana Rohrmoser

A visual communication design major, Juliana Rohrmoser ’18 recently took home three Indiana Collegiate Press Association state-level journalism awards for her work at The Reflector and The Reflector Online, including:

  • Best Sports Photo, First Place, “Football Keeps Breaking Records”
  • Best Sports Photo, Second Place, “Football Ends Historic Season with Playoff Loss”
  • Best Informational Graphic, Second Place, “Travel Ban Impacts UIndy Community”

JulianaawardsRohrmoser, who is an international student from Costa Rica, is a familiar face at the Department of Integrated Marketing & Communications (IMC), where she is a student worker assisting in graphics creation, social media management and digital content. She was honored as international student speaker at the annual Celebration of Flags in October 2017. Rohrmoser will pursue an internship with Cook Medical for the summer and has applied for graduate school. 

Q: What’s your hometown? What kind of travel experience did you have before coming to UIndy?

I am an international student from San Jose, Costa Rica. Before coming to UIndy I had visited the U.S several times. I’ve been to Florida, New York, and I played soccer at a tournament in Minnesota during high school and participated in a dance competition in Chicago as well. I’ve also traveled to South Africa, Zambia, Brazil, Panama, Mexico, France and Italy.

Q. Why did you decide to attend UIndy?

I decided to apply to UIndy because my dad had previously been to Indianapolis and loved the city. I found UIndy and really liked that the campus wasn’t too big or too small. When I looked into my major I was drawn to the way the curriculum was set up. I would have the opportunity to take drawing, painting and communication classes while working on graphic design as well.

Q. What has your UIndy experience been like so far? How would you describe the international culture at UIndy?

My experience at UIndy has been nothing short of amazing. I have met some fellow students, faculty and staff that have been very welcoming and who have helped me succeed in every project I take on. The UIndy community really appreciates international culture, not just because it’s “cool” that we’re from a different country but everyone really understands the value of having different cultures present on campus. It’s great to have events like the Celebration of the Flags, cultural presentations and even foreign language classes that bring the community together.

Slideshow: Meet the Class of 2018!

Q. What is your advice for domestic students who might not have much experience with other cultures?

I think in order for every UIndy student to make the most out of their educational experience, they have to engage with an international student. Even if it’s by being in the same group in a class, you’d be amazed to see the different perspective an international student can give you. From giving examples of how something is done in their home country to adding points of interest with facts about a different demographic, I know students and professors appreciate seeing cultural diversity.

Q. What do you think students on campus can do to understand the international perspective?

I think domestic students should try and understand what an international student goes through. They are away from their families and their homes. Basically everything that they were used to growing up is different when they’re here. What would you do if you couldn’t reach your parents in a situation where you really needed their help? Doing your insurance paperwork, paying bills without guidance and – oh my goodness – tax season!

Q. What activities are you involved in outside the classroom?

Outside of the classroom, I currently hold two on-campus jobs and one internship. I have been a student worker for IMC (UIndy Integrated Marketing & Communications) for almost two years and this opportunity has given me outside of the classroom experience in the field that I would like to go into after graduation. I also am the art director for The Reflector, our student newspaper at UIndy. I have also worked for the football team, the Writing Lab and the Professional Edge Center. I also have an internship at Raybourn Group International, an association management company located in the north side of Indianapolis. I have worked there since May of this year. I also participate in the UIndy Connectors program, regularly attend sports events and community service opportunities on- and off-campus. All of these experiences have contributed to making me a well-rounded student. I have made some great connections that have helped me during these past three years and will definitely be an important part of finding a job in the U.S. after graduation, which is my goal.

Q. Are there any professors, staff or students who have made your UIndy experience special?

Everyone I’ve met has made an impact on my experience, to be honest!

The Department of Art & Design has played a huge role in preparing me for jobs and internships, especially Julia Taugner. With every communications or design position I’ve held, they’ve all been impressed by my skill set.

I also have to credit IMC. I started as a student worker and now I’ve grown to become an active member of the team. This has given me opportunities to work on graphic design, learn about social media communications, event photography and even some content development for UIndy!

The Professional Edge Center has also helped me by guiding me through creating my resume, applying for internships and starting to apply for jobs after graduation. The team there is very welcoming and ready to help any student succeed and make the best of their experience.

Q. Why is an international perspective valuable in the workplace?   

International students are important to have as members of your community. They provide a different perspective, new knowledge, maybe solutions you wouldn’t think about because they’ve experienced different things. They also are a valuable member of the team because they expand people’s viewpoints. It’s so important to open your school or company to diversity. Different cultures add so much value to a community because they make people come together and learn from each other.

 

Educational psychologist makes global impact with “Just World” research

Kendra Thomas during her PSY 245 lecture class.

Kendra Thomas during her PSY 245 lecture class.

INDIANAPOLIS – When a child gets into trouble at school, a number of factors could be at play. For educational psychologist Kendra Thomas, a student’s perception of fairness is a factor that could be the key to understanding some adolescent behavior.

Thomas, assistant professor of psychology, focuses on social psychology theories such as Just World belief and systems justification theory. Her research, conducted in Brazil, Kenya and the United States, involves adolescents and how their beliefs about fairness can shape their worldview and school experience.

The data from her research can have several applications, from school discipline policies and cultural differences to understanding how different communities perceive the role of law enforcement.

“If I anticipate a level of fairness, I might be more motivated to work hard, but I also might be more motivated to blame the victim because I assume they must’ve received what they deserved,” Thomas explained.

Systems justification theory supports the idea that people tend to justify the systems they’re living in, and the more people are encompassed in the system, the more they might feel the need to justify it.

“I’m really interested with people’s interpretation of fairness and how that interpretation could drive their behavior,” said Thomas, who recently published research in Social Justice Research and Psychological Reports.

Psychology professor Kendra Thomas during her PSY (psychology) 245 lecture class in HEAL 407 on Monday, February 12, 2018. Pix taken for a story on her. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Thomas’ current research involves middle school students, their assumptions about fairness and their well-being. Her goal is not about determining if those rules are fair, but rather how students’ perceptions of fairness affects their behavior and well-being.

“The student who says that the rules aren’t fair is also more likely to report disrespecting the teacher, or to report being bullied or to say they don’t do their homework. Those are the kinds of relationships I look for in the data,” Thomas explained.

Her findings can help educators and parents address behavioral problems and provide a window into how students’ worldviews are being shaped through the context they grow up in.

“We could sit down with a group of teachers and parents and say, ‘I know that you think the rules are fair, but the student does not. So how do we communicate it so that not only is it fair but the student feels heard? That perception is going to influence their lived experience and what rules they choose to buy into and what rules they reject out of rebellion,” Thomas said.

Learn more about UIndy’s psychology programs here.

During research conducted in Brazil and Kenya, Thomas found that students who perceive their school and community as fair also were more likely to buy into the school rules.

The University’s psychology program offers undergraduate students a research practicum featuring one-on-one sessions with faculty throughout the semester. Thomas has worked with several students on this basis, including Karli LaGrotte ’18, who presented her research, “Belief in a Just World Among Brazilian Adolescents: Differences Across Age, Race and Religion,” during Scholar’s Day in April 2017.

Courtney Shepherd ’18 also worked with Thomas on undergraduate research. Shepherd plans to pursue a master’s degree in gerontology and to work with the elderly population.

“Dr. Thomas taught me each step of the research process and allowed me to be actively involved in data processing. She provided me with constructive criticism so I could be better in the research process,” said Shepherd.

Thomas has also advised graduate and doctoral students, including Erin Hoolihan ’20 (PsyD, clinical psychology). Hoolihan’s dissertation investigates the potential socioeconomic and racial differences that exist in the connection between perceptions of justice, social capital and well-being.     

“Dr. Thomas has always made my research a priority, and it is a wonderful experience to have an advisor who cares as much about my research as I do,” Hoolihan said.

Written by Sara Galer, Senior Communications Specialist, University of Indianapolis. Contact newsdesk@uindy.edu with your campus news.

Local Rev. Rob Fuquay and Grammy-winning musician Bela Fleck to receive honorary degrees

The University of Indianapolis will present honorary degrees to two individuals who are connecting communities through their work and artistry during the institution’s May 5 Commencement ceremony:

Rev. Rob Fuquay

Rev. Rob Fuquay

Rev. Rob Fuquay, author and senior pastor of St. Luke’s United Methodist Church in Indianapolis, and Béla Fleck, Grammy Award-winning banjo player and composer will be honored.

In addition to receiving degrees, Fuquay will present the keynote address to more than 1,400 graduates, and Fleck will perform a song on the banjo.

“Commencement is designed to celebrate and recognize the hard work at improving lives and enhancing communities,” said University President Robert L. Manuel. “Both of these recipients have spent their careers carving new paths and inspiring others with their craft.”

The University of Indianapolis has a rich history rooted in the United Methodist Church. Fuquay, head of the 6,000-member St. Luke’s Church — one of the largest in the denomination, is recognized as a rising thought leader in the church’s mission and vision to serve its many communities.

The Department of Music at the University of Indianapolis is recognized nationally for its world-class faculty and the talented students who compete for acceptance into the program. The University partners with local professional orchestras to provide a unique learning and performing environment in one of the top-rated facilities in the Midwest. Fleck credits many diverse influences and teachers for helping him to perform his music to audiences across the world.

“These honorary degree recipients reflect the University’s mission as a community-first institution that welcomes diverse thought and influences to advance its vision. We look forward to welcoming them to campus,” Manuel said.

Background

Rev. Fuquay, who has called Indianapolis home since 2011, formerly served as the senior pastor of Williamson’s Chapel United Methodist Church in Mooresville, NC. He is the fifth senior pastor appointed at St. Luke’s. As the author of several books and course guides on religious topics, Fuquay is considered a thought leader on innovative subjects designed to bring religion and inspiration to the entire community, not just his congregation. Throughout his career, Fuquay has served various congregations with his gifts of strong preaching, leadership development and visioning.

Béla Fleck (photo courtesy Jim McGuire)

Béla Fleck (photo courtesy Jim McGuire)

Béla Fleck, commonly described as the world’s best banjo player, has received 16 Grammy Awards, music’s top honor — and has been nominated in more Grammy categories than any other musician. He is best known for his eclectic musical pursuits and introducing the banjo to all genres of improvisational music.

He is lauded internationally as a solo artist as well as from his work with successful groups such as New Grass Revival and Bela Fleck and the Flecktones. Through collaborations with artists such as Sam Bush, Chick Corea, Branford Marsalis, Victor Wooten, Dave Matthews and many others, Fleck has reinvented the image and sound of the banjo.

Alumnus designs Good Hall model for 2017 holiday card

Visual communication design graduate Daniel Del Real ’05 offered his creative talents for this year’s University of Indianapolis holiday card.

Daniel Del RealGood Hall was an easy subject choice for Del Real—it’s where he held his first public art show during his senior year and he attended classes there every semester as a student as well.

“UIndy has managed to keep that tradition going today,” Del Real said. “All students are still going into this building for classes during their time on campus.”

While designing the card, Del Real built a scale model of Good Hall and adorned the building with miniature holiday decorations, ribbons on the columns and artificial snow. He even provided lighting on the inside of the model. He said he drew his inspiration from a card he received from a friend depicting a Christmas village. Once the model was finished, he photographed it for the University’s holiday card.

“It’s really wonderful to give back to the University,” Del Real said. “My fours years at UIndy were some of the best years of my life. So, to see that it has come full circle, I was glad to create this for UIndy.”

Del Real explained his biggest challenge was getting the proportions right. To do this, he said he measured the windows on several images provided by the University to assign a scale for each detail of the building, including the bricks, molding, columns and steps. Watch this short video to hear about his creative process.  

Because renovations are underway to restore Good Hall’s two-story portico and six columns at the main entrance, Del Real said, “this is an opportunity for incoming students to really see the potential of the building with the portico.”

The scale model of Good Hall will be on display at the Krannert Memorial Library following the holiday break.

Del Real is the resident artist at the International Marketplace Coalition, working to forge relationships between businesses, community and artists through public art programs and installations that enrich the International Marketplace neighborhood on Indy’s northwest side.

He received the University’s Distinguished Young Alumni Award at the Honors & Recognition Dinner in September. He also partnered with current students to create greyhound vignettes that were on display at that Homecoming event.

The Bickel family: Following in the footsteps of UIndy tradition

From left: Tyler, Cindy and Joe Bickel

From left: Tyler, Cindy and Joe Bickel

As UIndy Family Weekend approaches, the Bickel family of Carmel is sharing memories and looking forward to the future. Married for 22 years, Joe ’93 and Cindy Bickel ’93 first met as undergraduates at the University – and the family ties to UIndy go even further.

Joe and Cindy are all smiles when asked about how they met. Joe was working as an RA helping freshmen (including his brother Scott) move into the residence halls.

“I was helping my brother move into what was called North Hall at the time. I see this cute blonde walk by, and I’m thinking I’d like to get to know her, maybe,” he grinned. “Later on in the day, we happened to meet and I just said ‘hi’ to her. That evening, all the freshmen came over for the freshman dance. I thought if I happen to see her come into the Schwitzer Center, I’ll ask her to dance with me.”

He didn’t have to wait long.

“That evening, she came walking in with a bunch of friends and I asked her to dance. That went on and we dated through college,” said Joe.

The University’s criminal justice program, which recently celebrated its 45th anniversary, has played a major role in the lives of Joe and his brother Scott Bickel ’94, both of whom went on to pursue law enforcement careers after graduating from UIndy with degrees in criminal justice. Now Joe’s son Tyler ’21 is following in the family footsteps in a place that feels like home.

“UIndy gives you a very welcoming feeling in a friendly environment,” said Tyler.

The UIndy ties are strong in this family. Cindy graduated with a major in business and a minor in accounting in 1993. His brother Scott ’94 (criminal justice) and sister-in-law Steph (education) are UIndy alumni, and Cindy’s brother is also a graduate.

Tyler appreciates those family connections.

“Having both my parents as UIndy graduates, they’ve given me personal tips on UIndy – how to survive the first year. ‘You’re on your own now but we’re still looking out for you,’” he said.

Joe, a lieutenant with the Carmel Police Department, grew up in a law enforcement family and knew from a young age he wanted to be a police officer. He took a position with Carmel PD a year after graduating from UIndy. He’s served in several different roles at Carmel PD, including field training officer, community outreach, public information, hiring and recruiting and crime scene investigators supervisor.

Along with personal connections, Joe created important professional relationships through UIndy’s criminal justice program. Dennis Williams, assistant professor of criminal justice, was Joe’s law enforcement advisor who helped him obtain internships with Indiana State Police and the U.S. Customs Service.

“He was an awesome mentor and professor,” said Joe.

The Bickels have another son, Josh, who is a junior at Carmel High School.

Lilly program opens eyes of nursing students to the pharma industry

From the first time she explored the vast grounds of the global pharmaceutical company, University of Indianapolis nursing student Danielle Sparling realized her career path is much wider than she originally envisioned.

She enrolled at UIndy with solid plans of earning her degree and going on to become a family nurse practitioner. That may still be the case, but today she understands it’s not her only option thanks to an intense learning experience piloted this summer at Eli Lilly and Company (Lilly). Nurses at Lilly play important roles as researchers, regulatory scientists, case managers, global health consultants and more—all critical to becoming one of the largest pharmaceutical corporations in the world.

“From day one, I gained insight into how many avenues there are within the field of nursing. This was exciting, because I was able to learn about these non-traditional roles,” said Sparling, a sophomore.lillycropped

Sparling was one of four nursing students to participate in the pilot program this summer along with Serena Cornelius, Paige Hendershot and Samantha Hunter (all juniors). The Lilly/University of Indianapolis Nurse Education Program rotates the students through various aspects of Lilly’s operations—from drug discovery and development to bioethics and patient safety. The program is designed to educate students about the drug development process, the role of nurses in the industry and professional competencies for success in a healthcare business environment.

The students participated for four weeks in a structured mentorship involving real-world projects, industry-led professional development workshops and opportunities to network with Lilly nurses, experts and leaders. By exposing undergraduate students to the drug-development process, nursing students gained valuable knowledge of how patient-centered treatment options are developed and assessed.

“Nurses today have to be competent decisions makers,” said Jennifer Workman, co-leader of the Lilly program. “They need to have high-learning agility, be able to multi-task and communicate clearly and accurately information about treatment options.”

“Our students understand this was a very unique opportunity to learn about an industry they know very little about in these early stages of their education,” said Denise Ferrell, an assistant professor and program director in the School of Nursing. “This makes the nursing program at UIndy a more holistic experience by bridging the gap between nursing in an academic setting and what is available in our community.”

“Nurses are playing expanded roles as the health care system evolves to meet new needs. Nurses not only have enhanced responsibility and accountability in traditional settings, such as hospitals and clinics, but increasingly have roles that enable them to move across a variety of health care settings,” said Norma Hall, dean of the School of Nursing.

The education program also helps Lilly to educate future health care professionals about how pharmaceuticals are manufactured, tested and regulated, Workman said.

“The students have a unique vantage point and opportunity to work alongside some of the most talented health care professionals in the industry and understand their important roles in our organization,” Workman said. The students also reviewed the drug-approval process, investigated regulations, conducted literature reviews, assessed environmental trends and marketing strategies, researched treatment plans and created patient education materials.

The School of Nursing at UIndy is one of the leading pipelines for nurses across Indiana. The program is ranked among the top nursing programs in the Midwest by U.S. News and World Report. The program prides itself on meeting the rising need for nurses as the health care industry grows, regionally and nationally. By a global company like Lilly opening its doors and sharing its expertise, the School of Nursing can provide unique professional competencies and specialized knowledge to its students, Ferrell said.

“I have gained an appreciation for the drug development process and have found the nurses at Lilly all bring something special to the table because they actually know how a decision will affect the patient because of the connection they have,” Hunter said.

Hendershot added: “I never knew there were so many opportunities for nurses in the pharma industry. One of my biggest takeaways was how important pharma is to health care. Without it, new advancements in treatments would be rarely considered.”

“As a nurse in the future, I will be able to fall back on this key point and strive to be the best advocate possible for my patient,” Cornelius said.

For Sparling, Lilly reinforced her love for the profession and excitement about the next opportunity. On her last day in the Lilly internship, she learned she officially had been accepted in the UIndy nursing program.

“One of the Lilly doctors told us, ‘You’re best at what you love, and if you do just that, success will follow.’ I’ve never been happier for my chosen career path and can’t wait to see what the future holds,” Sparling said.

 

Service-learning advocates honored at expo

More than 150 University of Indianapolis students and faculty joined community partners in April for the Community Campus Forum & Service Expo, organized by the Center for Service-Learning & Community Engagement.

Community Campus Forum & Service Expo (Photo by D. Todd Moore)

Community Campus Forum & Service Expo (Photo by D. Todd Moore)

The expo honored students and community partners for their dedication to serving local populations who are most in need through service-learning courses. Students held poster sessions reflecting on lessons learned and their experiences, followed by an awards luncheon. Several faculty members were presented with certificates recognizing their contributions to service learning and completion of this year’s Faculty Development Cohort on Service-Learning at the University.

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UIndy nursing educator trains students with passion and commitment

On a recent tour of the University of Indianapolis’ School of Nursing, Rebecca “Becca” Cartledge introduced visitors to “Lou,” one of the lifelike mannequins used to train nursing students in the Nursing Simulation Lab, also known as the Sim Center. 

Becca Cartledge, center

Becca Cartledge, center

Cartledge, the nursing coordinator who runs the Sim Center, outlined Lou’s impressive capabilities, including the simulation of a heart murmur. UIndy nursing students also can check his respiration and insert an intravenous drip into his arm – and even resuscitate him.

Then Cartledge shared some surprising news.

“Lou’s going to die today,” Cartledge said, explaining that a simulated patient death is part of the training process. That emphasis on a realistic learning experience makes UIndy’s nursing program robust, as it focuses students on the real-life situations they’ll encounter in the field. The UIndy Sim Center is designed to be as close to a real hospital setting as possible.
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VP forges pioneer’s path for women in athletics

Ask Sue Willey for the key to success in leading collegiate athletics and she’s likely to tell you “perseverance pays off.”

Sue Willey, right, greets an athlete

Sue Willey, right, greets an athlete

Across four decades, Willey, the vice president for Intercollegiate Athletics at the University of Indianapolis, has served as a pioneer for women’s athletics at UIndy, where she helped to build Greyhound Athletics into a formidable NCAA Division II program. She learned as a young woman she had a passion for athletics, which she transformed into a mission to provide equality and opportunity for both male and female athletes on campus.
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