University of Indianapolis celebrates International Education Month

30th annual Celebration of the Flags (file photo)

The fifth annual International Education Month gets underway from mid-October to mid-November, with a variety of performing arts, film, lectures, and interactive events designed to showcase international, indigenous, and migrant cultures at the University of Indianapolis and the rich benefits of intercultural exchange.

Highlights include the 33rd Annual Celebration of the Flags on Oct. 14, 2-3 p.m. Modeled after the Olympic-style opening ceremony, the event is held outdoors on Smith Mall (rain location: The Arc) with international students, faculty, and staff carrying the flags representing the many nations of the University of Indianapolis community. 

Immediately following the Celebration of the Flags, students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to visit the International Exposition in the Atrium, Engagement Area, and Lawn of Schwitzer Student Center from 3-5 p.m. The Expo will feature interactive displays hosted by campus offices, departments, and student groups, including Study Abroad; Global Languages and Cross-Cultural Studies; the Writing Lab; International Relations; and Burmese, Nepali, Indian, and LatinX students, among others.  The Expo also features interactive activities such as henna tattoos, calligraphy, traditional artifacts, clothing displays, and coupons for discounted U.S. passport photos. Participants receive a “UIndy Passport” to be stamped by interacting with cultural presenters and table hosts for L/P credit. 

International Education Month Events

Oct. 11, Dining Services International Night #1, Schwitzer Student Center Cafeteria, $

Tonight’s menu features Asian cuisine.

Oct. 11, 7:30-10:30 p.m., Faculty Artist Concert Series: “Music from The World”, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center/Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Free admission, L/P Credit

A concert featuring UIndy international faculty and works. 

Oct. 13, 7:30-10:30 p.m., University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra Concert, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center/Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Free admission, L/P Credit

A concert featuring UIndy students and international works. 

Oct. 14, 2-3 p.m.: 33rd Annual Celebration of the Flags, Smith Mall, Free admission, L/P Credit

Join in the University of Indianapolis tradition of the Celebration of the Flags, representing the many nationalities of our UIndy community. Modeled after the Olympic-style opening ceremony, flag bearers feature the national colors and dress of their country.

Oct. 14, 3-5 p.m.: International Expo, Schwitzer Atrium, Schwitzer Engagement Area, and Schwitzer Lawn, 3-5 p.m., Free admission, L/P Credit

Immediately following the Celebration of the Flags, visit the International Exposition in the Atrium of Schwitzer Student Center. The Expo offers opportunities to engage with cultures represented at UIndy.

Oct. 14, 7:30-10:30 p.m., Indianapolis Baroque Orchestra, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center/Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Free admission, L/P Credit

A concert featuring international works. 

Oct. 18, Dining Services International Night #2, Schwitzer Student Center Cafeteria, $

Tonight’s menu features Irish cuisine.

Oct. 22, 6:30-9 p.m., Film: “Missing in Brooks County,” Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Christel De Haan Fine Arts Center, Free admission, L/P Credit 

Missing in Brooks County follows as “two families search for their loved ones who went missing in the fields of Brooks County,

Texas after crossing from Mexico and find a sobering truth: the deadliest part of the journey is far from the border.  It also features how law enforcement, volunteers and forensic scientists seek to search, recover and identify the bodies of the missing and the challenges they face. Co-Producers and Directors Jeff Bemiss and Lisa Molomot will introduce the film. After the film the audience will be introduced to a panel of four people who are either featured in the film or do work related to the film, and will be able to ask questions.  This includes members of the University of Indianapolis Beyond Borders Humanitarian Forensic Science Team, volunteers at the South Texas Human Rights Center and Co-Founder of the local advocacy group Indiana AID, which provides support to immigrants who have been detained by ICE here in Indiana.

Oct. 25, Dining Services International Night #3, Schwitzer Student Center Cafeteria, $

Tonight’s menu features Greek cuisine.

Oct. 25, 7:30-10:30 p.m., Ryan Behan, piano: Liszt’s Années de Pèlerinage: Suisse (“Years of Pilgrimage: Switzerland”), Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center/Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Free admission, L/P Credit
Franz Liszt’s Années de Pèlerinage (“Years of Pilgrimage”), widely considered one of his greatest works, was composed and reworked over the course of his life, and combines the freshness of the young composer with the clarity and meticulous fine-tuning of his Weimar period, unfolding into the mysterious and fragmentary brevity of his late style.  Alfred Brendel writes of these suites that they “draw for their inspiration on a reservoir of diverse impressions—nature and musical folklore, art and religion, craving for freedom; above all, on poetry and literature…The First Year of Pilgrimage—Switzerland—deals with nature in a twofold sense: as nature around us, and as nature within.”  Join faculty pianist Ryan Behan in a complete performance of this first part of Années de Pèlerinage.

Oct. 27, 6-8 p.m.:  Global Languages and Cultural Studies International Film Night presents “The Lives of Others” (Das Leben der Anderen), German with English subtitles:  HEAL 138, Free admission, L/P Credit

Join us for a screening of this international film followed by discussion. 

Nov. 1, Dining Services International Night #4, Schwitzer Student Center Cafeteria, $

Tonight’s menu features Indian cuisine.

Nov. 1, 7:30-10:30 p.m., Faculty Artist Concert Series: Music and Poetry from Around the World, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center/Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Free admission, L/P Credit

Joana Genova, violin; Haruka Ostojic, piano.  Poetry and music from  Bulgaria, Japan, Russia, India, France, Germany, Holland, North America, and South America with UIndy faculty Jyotika Saksena, Gerburg Garmann, Aksana Waskosky, Joana Genova, Haruka Ostojic, Ana Maria Ferreira, and Eileen Mah.

Nov. 3, 4-5 p.m. International Scholarship and Fellowship Opportunities, Virtual event, L/P Credit pending

Dr. Karen Newman, UIndy English professor and Honors College Assistant Director for Fellowships, hosts an information session on international scholarship and fellowship opportunities available to ALL UIndy students for undergraduate and post-graduation work and/or study, with specific information and application tips for the federally-funded Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program, the Fulbright Program, and Marshall Scholarships. Join us to learn more about free money to make your international aspirations a reality! L/P Credit

Nov. 3, 6-9 p.m. Diwali Fest, Schwitzer Student Center, Free admission, L/P Credit

UIndy students host the Indian festival of Diwali, complete with a rangoli art competition, dance, and dinner, introducing Indian culture to our campus community and bringing people of all nationalities together.

Nov. 8, Dining Services International Night #5, Schwitzer Student Center Cafeteria, $

Tonight’s menu features Latin-themed cuisine.

November 8, 7-8:30 p.m.: Peace Corps Panel, virtual event, L/P Credit

Former Peace Corps volunteers, including UIndy alums and members of the local Indianapolis community, share stories about their assignments and experiences in a variety of countries via a synchronous Zoom presentation. Panelists will address each of the six sectors of work available to Peace Corps volunteers (Agriculture, Community Economic Development, Education, Environment, Health and Youth in Development), plus information for potential applicants and strategies for successful applications. 

Nov. 9, 4-5 p.m.: “Candyland: An Afternoon of International Candy and Culture, UIndy Hall A, Free admission, L/P Credit pending

Candylan features samples of free, pre-packaged, popular candy from around the world, plus information on the various countries represented by the candy. Participants at the event visit booths hosted by international student representatives and the event organizers and help themselves to candy goodie bags to sample some of the world’s most popular sweets. The event also features a written trivia contest in which students identify the culture, language, and history of countries represented by the candy at the event. Winners will receive a basket of globally unique candy. The objective is for students to be educated, immersed, and gain awareness for cultures, global issues, and languages, through representative sweets.

Nov. 10, 7:30-9 p.m., Kellogg Writers Series: Fiction Reading with Lysley Tenorio, UIndy Hall A, Schwitzer Student Center and via Zoom, L/P Credit

Lysley Tenorio is the author of the novel The Son of Good Fortune and the story collection Monstress, which was named a book of the year by the San Francisco Chronicle. He is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, a Whiting Award, a Stegner fellowship, the Edmund White Award, and the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His stories have appeared in The Atlantic, Zoetrope: All-Story, and Ploughshares, and have been adapted for the stage by The American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco and the Ma-Yi Theater in New York City.  Born in the Philippines, he lives in San Francisco, and is a professor at Saint Mary’s College of California.

Nov. 13, 7-8 p.m., Study Abroad in Asia/Pacific Region: APIEA, virtual event, L/P Credit

Hosted by the Center for Global Engagement, this event features study abroad information for students interested in studying in Asia.  

Nov. 13, 7:30-10:30 p.m., University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra Concert, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center/Ruth Lilly Performance Hall,  Free admission, L/P Credit

A concert featuring UIndy students, faculty, and international works. 

Nov. 15, 7:30-10:30 p.m., Faculty Artist Concert Series: The Indianapolis Quartet Peforms Beethoven and Janáček, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center/Ruth Lilly Performance Hall and live-streamed, Free admission, L/P Credit

Zach DePue, violin; Joana Genova, violin; Michael Strauss, viola; Austin Huntington, cello. The concert features two masterworks of the string quartet repertoire: Beethoven’s glorious Tenth Quartet, filled with vitality, heart, invention, and accessibility, which earned its nickname “The Harp” from the first movement’s elegant pizzicato sections, and Janáček’s Intimate Letters, referring to hundreds of letters that he wrote over many years, expressing his love to a young, married woman.  Janáček described his second string quartet as “beautiful, strange, unrestrained, inspired, a composition beyond all the usual conventions.”

Nov. 16, 2-3 p.m.: “A Taste of Home,” UIndy Hall A, Free admission, L/P Credit

This student-hosted event features a video screening of UIndy international students discussing foodways and favorite foods from their home countries, plus an interactive discussion following the video, where participants learn more about the relationship of food and culture.  Free food and prize giveaways round out this cross-cultural experience.  

Nov. 17, 6-8 p.m.: Global Languages and Cultural Studies International Film Night presents “The Painting” (Le Tableau), French with English subtitles:  HEAL 138, Free admission, L/P Credit

Join us for a screening of this international film followed by discussion. 

Upcoming Events (details to follow):

Fulbright Program for UIndy Faculty, Virtual event, Time and date TBA

Join a guest Fulbright faculty ambassador who will share information for UIndy faculty about applying to the Fulbright Program for scholars and educators.  

International Careers, Student Internships, and the U.S. Foreign Service Exam, Virtual event, Time and date TBA; L/P Credit

Join the U.S. Department of State’s Diplomat in Residence for the North Central Region, who will share detailed information about international career opportunities and student internships, as well as information and tips for taking the highly competitive U.S. Foreign Service Exam.  

UIndy Engineering and Sociology Research Team Recognized as Best Paper Finalist at 2021 Engineering Education Conference

Dr. Megan Hammond, assistant professor in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering; Dr. Joan Martinez, assistant professor in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering; and Dr. Elizabeth Ziff, assistant professor of sociology, were recognized this July at the 128th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). 

The work of Hammond, Martinez, and Ziff was selected as a best paper finalist in the 2021 Design in Engineering Education Division (DEED) at the July meeting of ASEE. DEED accepted and published over 70 papers this year, and as a best paper finalist, the paper submitted by Hammond, Martinez, and Ziff was recognized as one of the top five works by the DEED committee. The submitted paper, “An exploration of Social and Educational Influences on User-centered Design: Revisiting a Compatibility Questionnaire” focuses on how to introduce the concept of social, cultural, and educational design biases to first-year engineering students learning about user-centered design and the definition of a “good” design. 

“This aligns specifically with the Engineering Accreditation Commission’s desire for students to engineer global and societal solutions,” said Hammond. “Our work is supporting the conversation to allow unique insights of first-year engineering students to naturally identify the complexity and impact of the design process.”

Hammond, Martinez, and Ziff were extremely honored by the recognition of their work at the DEED session, and would like to recognize the outstanding contributions of their student researcher, Dominique Lewis ‘23 (sociology). The team is moving forward with their work and building upon their publication and recognition by DEED to continue to bring diversity, equity, and inclusivity into the engineering curriculum at the University of Indianapolis. 

“The announcement was a true validation that the work we are doing at UIndy is relevant and welcomed by our colleagues driving the improvement of engineering design education,” said Hammond. “The team is excited to see how our work will continue to impact our students and how they approach design problems.”

UIndy welcomes Class of 2025

The University of Indianapolis welcomed the Class of 2025 during Welcome Week for the Fall 2021 semester. This fall nearly all courses are back in the classroom. Also in the works are in-person events, including full-capacity athletic events and more than 250 lectures, student events, and more. Below you’ll find photos from Welcome Week and the first week of classes!

Department of History and Political Science announces award recipients

The Department of History and Political Science recently announced award recipients for the 2021-22 academic year. Megan Young ’22, a political science major with minors in international relations, legal studies, and biology, received the Donald F. Carmony Award for Excellence in History and Politics. Kathryn Powell ’21 (history, pre-law concentration) received the Roland T. Nelson Scholarship.

“I was surprised, excited, and grateful to receive this reward and it means a lot for the Political Science department to choose me,” Young said.

Young talked about the support she’s received from faculty in the department.

Megan Young

“I really enjoy how close-knit the whole political science department is and how much they care about their students. One of the biggest things that will help me is the connections that I was able to make with the faculty. They are each a part of a much larger network and are always able and willing to open doors of opportunity for UIndy students,” she explained.

“Megan is easily one of the best students I have taught at UIndy. I had the pleasure of meeting her when she was a freshman. Like many excellent students, Megan was motivated, organized, and engaged. She arrived at UIndy eager to learn. She became proficient at reading for meaning. In her writing, she skillfully synthesized primary and secondary sources. I had the pleasure of presenting Megan for induction to Phi Alpha Epsilon. She is one of UIndy’s best,” said Mat Billings, associate faculty adjunct.

Kathryn Powell

Powell, whose goal is to become a lawyer, said UIndy’s professors have been the biggest factor in helping her prepare for her career.

“Dr. [Larry] Sondhaus and Dr. [Ted] Frantz have helped steer me in the right direction when preparing for law school and Dr. [Laura] Wilson has shown me several internship opportunities that have provided relevant experience for the field of law. I’ll certainly be grateful for them for many years to come,” she said. “I’m very grateful to be thought of by the faculty. It’s a good reminder of how much the faculty cares and actively encourages us to do our best.”

“Kathryn combines a fantastic work ethic with great insight, an analytical mind, and a knack for the written word.  She is a pleasure to have in the classroom,” said Ted Frantz, professor of history.

Earlier this year, the department also announced three Class of 2021 recipients for the Dwight L. Smith Award for Excellence in Research and Writing: Kelsey Green (history and psychology), Cameron Misner (political science and legal studies), and Karlye Vonderwell (political science and international relations).

University of Indianapolis named a College of Distinction for fifth consecutive year

University of Indianapolis campus

The University of Indianapolis has been recognized for its honorable commitment to engaged, hands-on education by Colleges of Distinction for the fifth consecutive year. As an institution whose primary goals are based on student success and satisfaction, the University of Indianapolis claims its honor as one of the renowned Colleges of Distinction. 

Colleges of Distinction’s longstanding support for student-centered schools highlight those that traditional rankings often overlook. Founder Wes Creel created Colleges of Distinction to draw more attention to schools like the University of Indianapolis, whose student-centered education prevails in applying theory to practice while fostering a dynamic learning community and creating active examples of the University’s motto, “education for service.” 

Colleges of Distinction’s selection process comprises a sequence of in-depth research and detailed interviews with the schools about each institution’s freshman experience and retention efforts alongside its general education programs, career development, strategic plan, student satisfaction, and more—and accepting only those that adhere to the Four Distinctions: Engaged Students, Great Teaching, Vibrant Community, and Successful Outcomes. These principles are all informed by the High-Impact Practices to prioritize how institutions enable students to have a fulfilling, individualized college experience.

Along with being honored as a College of Distinction for its high-impact approach to education, the University of Indianapolis has received specialized recognition for its Business, Education, Nursing, and Engineering programs. These additional accolades were borne out of a need for college curricula that are comprehensive not only in course material, but also in practical and soft-skills development. 

The University of Indianapolis has also received special recognition for its Career Development program. Schools awarded the Career Development badge have shown that they are well equipped to help their students graduate with confidence. The badge recognizes schools with comprehensive four-year plans, advising, and more. The University of Indianapolis offers numerous resources through its Professional Edge Center, providing unparalleled support throughout every stage of career exploration, development, and application.

Creel and his colleagues found that the most popular college rankings systems rely on metrics like peer reputation, size of endowment, and alumni salaries. They knew instead that the effective strategies for student satisfaction and outcomes were the kinds of engaging experiences found at the University of Indianapolis: living-learning communities, capstone projects including the Strain Honors College, study abroad programs with the Center for Global Engagement, Center for Service-Learning & Community Engagement programs, Office of Inclusion & Equity initiatives, undergraduate research, and interdisciplinary academic experiences.

About Colleges of Distinction
Since 2000, Colleges of Distinction has been committed to honoring schools throughout the U.S. for true excellence in higher education. The member schools within the Colleges of Distinction consortium distinguish themselves through their dedicated focus on the undergraduate experience. Its website provides dynamic college profiles, customized tools, and resources for students, parents, and high school counselors. For more information, and to learn how to become a College of Distinction, visit CollegesofDistinction.com.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

UIndy Center for Aging & Community celebrates 20 years of impact

When the University of Indianapolis Center for Aging & Community (CAC) was first launched as a university-based center of excellence 20 years ago in 2001, it did so with expectations that it would have a transformative effect on older adults in Indianapolis, the state, the region and beyond, as well as on the university. Twenty years later, those expectations have been fulfilled, and the Center is continuing to find new ways to positively impact lives. 

Impact on the university

“The idea was that the Centers (CAC & Center for Excellence in Leadership of Learning) would provide a way for the university to reach outside of itself, not only in terms of being known and recognized, but also in terms of attracting grants and consulting projects to the university,” said Dr. Ellen W. Miller, CAC’s executive director, who has been a part of the Center since its inception.

UIndy Joy’s House

“When we started,” recalled Miller, “UIndy didn’t have the infrastructure for doing large-scale grant and contract work. There was no IRB (institutional review board), no grants office, no accounting experience or framework to manage this kind of work.”

Then-university President Jerry Israel said the Centers “were going to pull the university along” to move the institution to a place where receiving grant dollars and revenue from consulting contracts would be a normal part of university business.   

Read more: CELL-ebrating 20 years of excellence!

“CAC helped pull UIndy along,” Miller said. “Now we have many of the processes and policies in place, making it easier for everyone on campus to do the same kind of work. The university stepped up to make the necessary changes, with the Centers leading the way. That’s important because every grant or contract we bring in extends the university’s reputation and diversifies the university’s revenue streams.”

Impact on the community, state, and region

There have been plenty of contracts secured by CAC in the past 20 years, though that was not the initial focus of its work. When CAC was launched, an advisory group worked to narrow the Center’s focus to a few key issues, including meaningful work for older adults and aging in place. After several years of focusing on its own interest areas, CAC leadership realized that its strength came from the ability to partner with aging network organizations around their interest areas. What organizations needed was a University partner that could help accomplish real work as well as bring subject matter expertise. CAC flipped its business model to one that brought the expertise and capability of UIndy to organizations that work with or on behalf of older adults. The interprofessional team at CAC has become known for its ability to work collaboratively and is a sought after partner for solving real-world challenges faced by aging network organizations.  

CAC is a financially self-supporting unit, as well as generating revenue to support university functions.That revenue has come from contracts with state agencies such as the Indiana Department of Health, the Indiana Division of Aging, the Tennessee Department of Health, and the Minnesota Department of Human Services – Aging & Adult Services Division. In addition, CAC has also partnered with funders, nursing home corporations, and health care organizations to conduct needs assessments, develop and deliver training, manage complex projects, and design and implement program evaluation. CAC also partners with other universities when the expertise and capabilities of both organizations are necessary to achieve project goals. When possible, CAC brings in the expertise of UIndy faculty to work on its contracts and projects and has provided applied experience in aging for many graduate students. 

Indiana National Guard training
The CAC assisted with training for the Indiana National Guard who were deployed to nursing homes to assist during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“All of the work of our team is done with the intent of improving quality of life for all people as they age,” Miller said. “We’ve made an impact in the areas of better health for nursing home residents, more efficient and effective spending on aging services by government agencies, and education and training of people who work with older adults. We even helped train the National Guard troops deployed to Indiana nursing homes during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.” 

CAC has also been deliberate about being a good partner to the rest of the university, providing service to the campus through efforts such as Memory Cafes, the Caregiver Resource Group, and presentations like Dementia Friends and the Virtual Dementia Tour. 

“Aging is a common thread that ties us all together,” Miller said. “We try to help others make sure that thread is brightly colored and vibrant.”

Anniversary Show

In recognition of its 20th anniversary, the Center for Aging & Community has partnered with the UIndy Theatre Department and the Fonseca Theatre to reprise performances of “Forever Sung: A Celebration of Age in Song,” an original work created for the Center’s 10th anniversary. The performances will take place at the Fonseca Theatre on November 13 and 14 and at the UIndy black box theatre on November 20 and 21. More details and tickets will be available this fall.

UIndy network helps Jacob Weisenbach ’17 ‘pay it forward’

Building community connections could well be the defining career principle for Jacob Weisenbach ’17 (M.A., educational leadership). A graduate of the University of Indianapolis’ nationally recognized iLEAD program, Weisenbach was recently honored with the Outstanding Community Partner Award from the Center for Service-Learning & Community Engagement for his work at Central Catholic School, where he served as assistant principal for the past three years. 

Jacob Weisenbach (M.A., educational leadership)

As Weisenbach prepares to take on a new role with Indianapolis Public Schools as a special education specialist at Arsenal Technical High School, he reflected on ways the iLEAD program prepared him for success.

“I really enjoyed the concept of the iLEAD program for its hybrid nature. I got an in-depth experience working with other dedicated educators and that cohort mentality of working together to solve problems, having actual dialogue in front of people and working to better prepare ourselves to serve our schools immediately through the program,” Weisenbach said.

Weisenbach worked at Wayne Township Schools as an inclusion teacher in special education while he completed the iLEAD program at the University of Indianapolis, then went on to serve as assistant principal at Central Catholic. In his new role, he will serve inclusion teachers at Arsenal Tech.

With the iLEAD program, Weisenbach said he was able to leverage broad experience to grow his overall leadership skills. 

“It takes a great partnership between myself and the student, the school I was working at – Bridgeport Elementary – and the University, to allow for the flexibility to take on new leadership activities and even to step outside of my role as a teacher and take part in opportunities at different levels,” he said.

Weisenbach grew up close to UIndy on Brill Road near Hanna Ave., attending St. Roch Catholic Church and school. When the time came for college, he felt that the UIndy campus was a little too close to home and opted for IUPUI. After serving nine years with the Army National Guard, including tours in Baghdad and the United States, he was ready to own his calling to become a teacher. Encouraged by his wife, Natalie, also a UIndy alum, he came to appreciate the opportunities that awaited him at UIndy.

“I really found my love for that great university that was in my backyard the whole time. It was like an undiscovered treasure I knew about!” he said.

The Weisenbach name may be familiar to the Greyhound community. Jacob Weisenbach’s aunt, Lynne Weisenbach, was the first executive director of the Center of Excellence in Leadership of Learning (CELL), serving from 2001 to 2008, and helped pen the Center’s name, which highlights the model of transformative partnerships that are reshaping education in Indiana.

“That sense of community was always there for me,” said Weisenbach. He noted that even outside of those family connections, “the University does a great job to create and cultivate these relationships.”

Weisenbach would continue to build his UIndy network while at Central Catholic, thanks to introductions by RightFit, an after-school program partnership between the Archdiocese of Indianapolis and Notre Dame ACE Academies. RightFit introduced Weisenbach to Marianna Foulkrod, director of the Center for Service-Learning & Community Engagement at UIndy, leading to opportunities for UIndy students to serve in a variety of roles. 

“Jacob has been exceptional in working with our students and faculty to create service-learning experiences that connect them with UIndy’s mission of education for service,” said Marianna Foulkrod. “We are excited to see where these new relationships will take us.”

Central Catholic is now an official community partner with UIndy, and Weisenbach was recently recognized for those efforts with the Outstanding Community Partner Award. He noted that having that close partnership already in place was key to navigating the challenges of the pandemic.

“Central Catholic was one of the few places striving for a safe, in-person connection even through the bumpy waters of 2020 and 2021. For students seeking the opportunity, they were able to come to us and we were able to conduct the program in a safe manner,” Weisenbach explained.

As Weisenbach steps into his new role at Arsenal Tech, he is eager to grow his connections with the Center for Service-learning & Community Engagement.

“I’m sure there will be opportunities at a larger campus, and I’m curious to see how we can expand the role of service and leadership at Tech,” he said. 

Weisenbach appreciates the UIndy students who have built connections with Central Catholic. In many cases they return to become coaches, check in on the students and attend their graduations.

“The connections we make, and the time and service we build together, help to foster and create this sense of community throughout,” Weisenbach said. “The opportunity to become educational neighbors really enhances the spirit of what you’re doing. The work that we do is the business of teaching and learning, but the connections that we make are where we get our joy and fulfillment in our missions.”

University of Indianapolis announces Dean’s List and Honor Roll for 20-21 Semester II and Annual Honor Roll for 20-21 academic year

Dean's List and Honor Roll graphic

The University of Indianapolis has published a list of students who have been named to the Dean’s List or Honor Roll for Semester II and/or the Annual Honor Roll of the 2020-21 academic year.

The online database can be found here: http://news.uindy.edu/honors.

The database includes a listing of the student’s name along with hometown and honors earned. The list can also be sorted by zip code to generate results representing your community.

Students named to the Dean’s List have completed at least 12 hours during a semester and earned a grade point average of 3.7 or higher. Honor Roll students have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours and earned a grade point average of at least 3.4 but less than 3.7. Semester Honor Rolls and Dean’s List encourage scholarship of high quality and give appropriate public acknowledgment to students whose work deserves recognition.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

UIndy observes Juneteenth with vibrant celebration

The University of Indianapolis Office of Inclusion and Equity hosted the Juneteenth 2021 Family Affair: In Solidarity earlier this week. The University joined the nation in continuing to celebrate Juneteenth, which is the oldest national commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States 156 years ago. 2021 marks the first year for the celebration and the University’s observance of Juneteenth as an official holiday.

On Thursday, June 17, the celebration featured speakers like Rev. Dr. Aleze M. Fulbright, DJs, original poetry readings, and a dance performance from the Iibada Dance Company. 

The Black National Anthem was performed by Tremayne Horne, an assistant director in UIndy’s Professional Edge Center. When asked about the importance of the event, Horne said, “America comes together to celebrate what happened on July 4, 1776, but has not acknowledged that Africans and African Americans were still slaves at the time. We were not free. It was not until  June 19, 1865 (89 years later) that African Americans became free. Giving honor to those that fought for freedom and allowing space to those that choose to celebrate shows that UIndy acknowledges and supports all students.”

Horne, who also helped plan the event, said he was most proud of “the young men and women that have worked so hard to make this happen and the support and freedom that [the Office of Inclusion and Equity] has given them to express themselves.”

The entire UIndy community was invited to the celebration, including alumni and friends. The event resonated with Black alumni including DyNishia Miller ‘14. Miller said, “it shows that the University values and recognizes the significance of this day and its meaning to our country and Black Americans.” She added that it feels really good “as a Black alumna” to see UIndy celebrating the holiday.

“I hope the University will continue to create inclusive spaces and provide opportunities for diverse students, faculty, staff, and alumni to thrive, be understood, and be embraced. A more diverse, inclusive, and equitable UIndy is a better UIndy for all of us,” said Miller. 

The Juneteenth Family Affair also served as an educational opportunity for many members of the UIndy community. An activity book was designed by Tylyn Johnson ’22. The book was given to attendees that highlighted the history of the holiday, its importance for the Black community and how everyone can get involved.  

The Office of Inclusion and Equity also hosts a podcast series titled “Juneteenth Conversations” to help encourage diversity discussions. You can listen to previous podcast episodes here. We look forward to additional events hosted by the Office of Inclusion and Equity to honor and celebrate our diverse campus and alumni community. 

University of Indianapolis announces Patrick Van Fleet as new dean of Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences

The University of Indianapolis announced today that Patrick Van Fleet, Ph.D., has been appointed as the next dean of the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences effective July 26, 2021. His announcement follows an extensive national search.

Dr. Van Fleet most recently served as professor and chair for the Department of Mathematics at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. He also served as director of the endowed Center for Applied Mathematics (CAM) at St. Thomas. During that time, Dr. Van Fleet was funded by the National Science Foundation on four projects totaling $1.3 million, wrote three books on wavelet theory, published several papers on wavelet theory and spline functions, and led numerous undergraduate research projects. He was a 2016 recipient of the John Ireland Presidential Award for Outstanding Achievement as a Teacher-Scholar at the University of St. Thomas.

Patrick Van Fleet, dean of the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences
Patrick Van Fleet, dean of the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences

“Dr. Van Fleet comes to UIndy at a crucial time for our University, as we emerge from the pandemic and find new ways to thrive and fulfill our mission to both our students and the community,” said Dr. Mary Beth Bagg, interim provost and vice president. “I am confident that Dr. Van Fleet will continue the tradition of innovation in the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences by not only supporting opportunities for students to develop essential skills in their areas of study, but also by fostering successful transitions to their careers or further study at the graduate level.”

“I am excited and grateful to join the University of Indianapolis and the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences. The College’s emphasis on helping faculty combine research and classroom work through the Shaheen grants aligns closely with my teaching and learning philosophy,” said Dr. Van Fleet. “I am eager for the opportunity to lead the College and the University in reaching new goals in interdisciplinary collaboration, community engagement, and regional workforce needs.” 

Dr. Van Fleet earned his Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics (education emphasis) from Western Illinois University and his Master of Science and PhD in mathematics from Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He worked at Sam Houston State University from 1992-1998, where he performed research in the emerging field of wavelet theory (funded in part by the National Science Foundation) and led a large project funded by a branch of the Department of Defense. In 1998, he became director of the endowed Center for Applied Mathematics at the University of St. Thomas and from 2011 served as chair of the Department of Mathematics. 

“The Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences is thrilled to welcome Dr. Van Fleet to our community,” said Dr. Mary Moore, interim dean of the Shaheen College. “His passion for undergraduate research and connecting students with industry mentors will enhance our robust programs and expand opportunities for students and faculty alike.”

About the University of Indianapolis

The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

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