December 2017 Graduation: Meet Giauna Neville

img_5820Giauna Neville has loved music since the sixth grade when she started playing clarinet and saxophone. Since enrolling at the University of Indianapolis, she has found a way to expand her musical talents and chart a career path for herself.

This December, she will graduate from the University of Indianapolis with a bachelor’s degree in music education, with a primary focus on percussion and a secondary focus on piano. Neville  plans to attend graduate school next year for jazz studies, and credits the University for growing her diverse musical background into a budding career doing what she loves.

“UIndy prepared me well for this career path because I participated in jazz groups while I was on campus. I developed more of a passion for jazz and drumming, so I officially decided to take my studies even further.”

She credits specific faculty members with serving important roles in her growth as a musician and preparation for her career.

“My faculty advisor, Dr. Rebecca Sorley, and my private teacher, Paul Berns, changed my life and how I am as a musician,” she explained. “They pushed me at times when I wanted to give up and they are the reason I am where I am today! I thank them both from the bottom of my heart.”

More than 50 student organizations exist at the University. Giauna said the Black Student Association (BSA) and National Association for Music Education (NAfME) helped her become closer to her peers, teachers and other music educators in the state.

“BSA helped me keep up with current events and provided opportunities that were non-music related,” she said. “Being involved with NAfME was nice because I could talk to others who were going through the same process as me.”

She wants potential students to know that, regardless of your major, University faculty make you think outside the box.

“From the top-notch programs to the faculty in them, you will be challenged in all your classes,” she said.

“UIndy went above and beyond my expectations! I got to experience the full ‘college experience’ and so much more. It was a lot of hard work, but it was all worth it in the end!”

 

Read about other 2017 December graduates.

Learn about 2017 December graduation

December 2017 Graduation: Meet Kyleigh Randolph-Hernandez

Kyleigh Randolph HernandezKyleigh Randolph-Hernandez is a music education student at the University of Indianapolis who will graduate December 2017. Kyleigh has a choral focus and voice is her primary instrument, although she’s also taken piano lessons. We sat down with Kyleigh to learn about her experience on campus and how the University helped her prepare for the next steps in her career.

Q. What are your plans after graduation?

A. I’m currently searching for a job teaching music at local schools. I feel very prepared for whatever teaching job I am ultimately offered thanks to my preparation at UIndy. I was constantly in the public school classroom throughout my college years and because of that I feel confident in my teaching skills. I greatly appreciate my time at UIndy and everything my professors did to ensure I was prepared for the job field.

Q. What made you choose the University’s music program?

A. I chose UIndy’s music program because it was close to home, because it has some great professors and it is accredited while some other local universities are not.

Q. What would you want a potential student to know about the Department of Music?

A. I would like prospective students to know UIndy is a very welcoming environment. There are people from all over the world and who practice all kinds of religions. That’s one of the things I love most about UIndy! For potential music students, I would like them to know that a music degree, especially music education, is a lot of work because the professors really push you to be your absolute best. However, it is 100 percent worth it. I learned so much in my four years of classes and gained some very valuable experience in my field that I would not have gotten from other universities.

Q. What is a favorite memory from your time on campus?

A. My favorite memory was my senior recital. It felt great to be up on stage doing what I love.

Q. Has your college experience lived up to your expectations?

A. UIndy has far exceeded my expectations. The professors are so kind and they genuinely want you to succeed. They don’t mind getting you into gear or lending a listening ear if that’s what you need. After graduation, I plan on still being in contact with my professors and getting together for coffee.

Q. Who at UIndy – faculty, staff, students – have influenced or helped you along the way?

A. Dr. Mitzi Westra was my private voice professor. She became a great mentor for me and frequently opened her office to me when I was feeling stressed and just needed to talk. I learned a lot from her, including techniques I will be using with my future students. Dr. Brenda Clark is the chair of the music department and has a focus on music education. She kept me on track throughout my college years and encouraged me to not settle for “good enough.”

Q. Were you involved in any extracurricular activities ? If so, what were they and how did they enhance your experience?

A. I was involved in NAfME, (National Association for Music Education), the UIndy choirs, and the opera at UIndy. These groups allowed me to take on leadership roles as I was president and section leader in the choirs and I received many professional development opportunities from my involvement in NAfME.

 

Read about other 2017 December graduates.

Learn about 2017 December graduation

December 2017 Graduation: Meet Delmar Oropeza

delmaroropezaDelmar Oropeza ’17 (biology, chemistry minor, pre-pharmacy concentration), was one of two Ron & Laura Strain Honors College students who received a research grant along with her co-researcher Sierra Corbin from the Sigma Zeta National Honor Society to conduct and present research at the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) Conference in Atlanta. She is graduating in December.

Q. Congrats on your research grant from Sigma Zeta National Honor Society! What are your thoughts about receiving the grant?

A. I was pleased and thankful that Sigma Zeta was willing to fund our research. This grant meant that [co-researcher] Sierra [Corbin] and I would not have to fund our project. It was interesting to hear what professors and other students thought about our research. Most of them seemed really interested, especially because of the involvement of food.

Q. Could you briefly describe your research? What inspired you to pursue this topic?

A. We wanted to determine a procedure that could test the genotype of individuals for a portion of the gene that contains a marker for the taste preference of cilantro. We wanted to test if the way individuals perceive the taste of cilantro is genetic or not. Sierra and I enjoyed taking genetics with Dr. [Sandy] Davis (associate professor of biology), so we worked with her on our capstone/honors project. She gave us the idea, which caught our attention.

Q. How did your research experience – and Honors College in general – prepare you for the next steps in your career?

A. The research experience allowed me to expand my learning and communicative capabilities. There was a lot of reading and interpretation of papers that took place, which allowed me to expand my analytical intakes. We presented our research several times during the course of the project, and this helped me develop my public speaking skills. 

Q. What are your plans after graduation?

A. I plan to go to pharmacy school. I just submitted my pharmacy school applications to Purdue and Ferris State University. 

Q. Were you involved in any extracurricular activities as a student? If so, what were they and how did they enhance your experience?

A. I was involved with Chemistry Club, Sigma Zeta, Biology Club, Pre-Professional Club, College Mentors and I currently have a part-time job as a pharmacy technician at Wal-Mart Pharmacy. These activities enhanced my abilities to balance school, clubs and work. I think being in multiple associations and organizations has made me into a better student as well as a better organizer and manager of time in my daily life.  

Q. Were there any faculty, staff or fellow students who helped you during your time as a student?

A. There have been numerous professors and students who have helped guide my education. I would like to thank Dr. [Sandy] Davis, Dr. [Jim] Williams, Dr. [Kevin] Gribbins, Dr. [Doug] Stemke, Dr. [Marc] Milne, and Sierra Corbin for encouragement and advice during my years at the University of Indianapolis. Professors have served as advisors and mentors with not only schoolwork, but life-long decisions and career options as well. 

Q. Why would you recommend UIndy to prospective high school students?

A. I would recommend UIndy because the small classroom setting gives students the opportunity to know their professors. My advice to incoming freshmen is to not get overwhelmed during the first semester. And if such thing does happen, talk to your professors because they care about your education as much as you do. 

Q. Any other big takeaways or observations as you approach graduation?

A. I am super excited to graduate. I am ready for the next step, and now I am just anxiously waiting to start learning in depth about my future career!

 

Read about other 2017 December graduates.

Learn about 2017 December graduation

December 2017 Graduation: Meet Sierra Corbin

sierracorbinSierra Corbin ’17 (biology major, chemistry minor) talks about her experience in the Ron & Laura Strain Honors College. She and co-researcher Delmar Oropeza ’17 received a research grant from the Sigma Zeta National Honor Society to conduct and present research at the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) Conference in Atlanta. Once she graduates in December, she plans to enter a physician assistant program.

Q. How did the Sigma Zeta grant assist in your research?

A. I was thankful about receiving the grant, because it paid for a lot of materials we needed to order for our project. The experience presenting at the conference was beneficial. We received feedback from judges so that we could improve our skills of presenting scientific research. It was also quite interesting to see what other students around the United States study.

Q. Could you briefly describe your research?

A. Our research analyzed the DNA of individuals that liked and disliked cilantro. Using the information and the procedure Delmar and I conducted, I wrote a laboratory procedure for undergraduate level students to use in genetics courses.

Q. How did your research experience – and Honors College in general – prepare you for the next steps in your career?

A. The research and presentation experience prepared me for learning how to explain to others who may not have as much knowledge about a particular topic, what is happening in a given situation. When I become a physician assistant, I am sure I will need to explain to patients what an illness may be, what caused it and how to treat it. If I do not end up going to graduate school to become physician assistant, I probably will go into research of some kind. Completing undergraduate research allowed me to become familiarized with the equipment and techniques I would need in my future.

Q. Were you involved in any extracurricular activities as a student?

A. I participated in UIndy for Riley and worked off campus, which took up a lot of my free time. Learning the skill of time management was essential and helped me become well rounded. Working also helped me get many of the clinical hours that physician assistant programs require.

Q. Were there any faculty, staff or fellow students who helped you during your time as a student?

A. Dr. [Sandy] Davis (biology) helped me tremendously through this project. She helped me in learning an abundance of knowledge about genetics. Also, Dr. [Marc] Milne (biology) was an awesome mentor and professor my freshman year, encouraging me to follow the biology route I had set for myself. Dr. [Kathy] Stickney was another professor who genuinely cared about her students performance and would go above and beyond for her students. I will never forget when she stayed at school until 2:00 a.m. helping students edit a paper and learn material.

Q. Would you recommend UIndy to prospective high school students?

A. UIndy is an awesome school, and is much better than some bigger schools in professor-student ratios. I have a few friends at large universities who cannot get appropriate help when they are struggling in a class. At UIndy, the teachers genuinely care about our academic success. Some of our courses definitely are harder than they would be at other schools, but that makes us more prepared.

 

Read about other 2017 December graduates.

Learn about 2017 December graduation

Students advise Citizens Energy on steam plant efficiencies

Seven University of Indianapolis students partnered with Citizens Energy this semester to gain real-world work experience through the Partnership for Excellence in Research and Learning (PERL) initiative.

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The PERL project creates mutually beneficial connections in Indiana communities. Students gain professional development opportunities in a collaborative environment, while businesses receive fresh insight into industry challenges. The project helps foster critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, both key areas of focus to a University of Indianapolis education.

Kirk Bryans, assistant director of business, entrepreneurship, sports management and marketing, Professional Edge Center, said programs like PERL are important to the University on a couple different levels: Students get exposure to working with professionals in the community trying to solve real world problems and find ways of doing things better. Working within a cross functional team provides students real life team building scenarios which normally doesn’t happen until you are in the midst of your first job.  

Our employer partners are experiencing the power of a University of Indianapolis education,” Bryans said. “They recognize how incredible our students really are. Each interaction is a win-win as both parties exchange information.”

The University group includes students pursuing diverse areas of study: Carsen Alber (environmental sustainability/criminal justice), Liz Behrends (information systems), Grace Buck (human biology), Casey Brock (supply chain management), Xavier Ortiz (chemistry), Kyler Nichols (accounting) and Holly Cox (chemistry/biology).

The students were tasked with identifying ways to improve efficiencies at the Perry K Steam Plant in downtown Indianapolis. The goal was to find environmentally friendly solutions that also would minimize consumer costs moving forward.

The students toured the steam plant several times, analyzed data from Citizens Energy, met with employees from the steam plant and broke into smaller task groups to achieve their goals, spending about 45 hours on the project from September to November.

In December 2017, they presented findings and recommendations to about a dozen industry experts.

Highlights included streamlining a spreadsheet used for reporting water consumption at the plant, reducing time spent on the task from two hours to about two minutes. They also evaluated methods used in the water treatment process, investigated hydro-electric generation in plant systems to offset purchased power and identified technologies to measure the inlet flow into the plant water system.

“We were thrilled to have the UIndy students engaged with our steam business,” Ann McIver, director of environmental stewardship, said. “Their independent views of our plant water system allowed them to “Challenge the Process,” one of our core leadership practices. Their recommendations may allow us to offset our cost of electricity, and their advanced spreadsheet knowledge will bring time savings to steam personnel on a routine basis.”

The experience also provided valuable insight into how a cross-functional team operates and allowed the University students to directly impact their community.

“It’s not everyday that we get to work with people from different majors to help an organization so prevalent in central Indiana,” Nichols said. “This project really taught me how to work with people that think differently than I do and how to balance my time between classes and my other obligations.”

Levi Mielke, assistant chemistry professor, supported the PERL initiative with Bryans by generating the scope and description of the project, interviewing and selecting candidates and acting as liaisons between the University and Citizens Energy.

“We successfully brought together an interdisciplinary team of students to tackle a project bigger than themselves,” Mielke said. “We have the best students at UIndy. Not only have they become content experts, but can apply their knowledge and adapt to new learning situations while providing a valuable community service.”

Watch this short video to learn more about the Professional Edge Center.

Proposed Tax Plan Could Hurt Indiana Students

The proposed changes to our tax codes being considered by the U.S. Congress will negatively impact our regional economic competitiveness by limiting the ability for Hoosiers to earn a college degree. As for our tax code, clearly it is time to think about better ways to manage how and why we tax. But, in the case of the current tax changes under consideration, the sweeping impact to higher education will have a devastating effect to our communities in the long term.

Higher education serves as as catalyst for positive change in workforce development, economic revitalization and bolstering our quality of life. The more people earning a college degree or credential, the more competitive our region becomes in attracting businesses, creating new ones, filling workforce needs, and supporting an informed citizenry.

At a time when our country should be making higher education more accessible and affordable, these changes threaten many benefits that fundamentally impact the ability of students to attend college. The proposal, up for a vote by the U.S. Senate as early as Friday, will cost institutions, parents, and students an additional $65 billion over the next 10 years, according to the American Council on Education.

The impact of the proposed changes on higher education will make it more costly for universities to access debt to improve learning facilities, provide funding opportunities for students and create environments of innovation. More than 12 million people benefit from student loan interest deductions each year, which the proposed legislation would eliminate. This is money that not only helps students and families pay for college but also allows for more investment to support a strong economy. Students who receive tuition waivers now face the prospect of those funds being considered as taxable income. The proposal also would tax endowments at institutions across the country that support student success. In addition, tuition reimbursement programs–a valuable tool for attracting talent and helping university employees afford college for themselves and their children–also soon could be considered taxable income.

The proposed changes ultimately will have the effect of adding to the growing $1.4 trillion in student debt that continues to weigh heavily on college graduates today. They also will have a chilling effect on enrollments, which will create a long-term decline in our state’s talent base for the future.

The University of Indianapolis has a proud tradition of welcoming first-generation college students (about 40 percent of total enrollment each year). More than 86 percent of our alumni choose to live in Indiana, and our University offers more than $48 million dollars of its own money to help talented students earn a college degree. All of the other institutions of higher education in our state provide similar benefits to the region.

The proposal before Congress also will have consequences for our regional economic development well into the future. Indiana has a long-standing commitment to bolstering the intellectual capital in our state. We are recognized as a state that incubates technological innovations, attracts new business, and provides one of the most enviable standards of living in the country. These proposed changes will increase the chances that we will lose our economic momentum and slow the advances we have made in preparing a 21st Century workforce. These are the core engines of success in Indiana, and any future changes to the tax code should be mindful of the important role higher education plays in safeguarding them.

 

Robert L. Manuel
University of Indianapolis President

 

Contact
David Hosick
Director of Communication
317-410-5992

UIndy spreads message of life-saving text-to-911 Lifeline Law

Advocates for the Indiana Lifeline Law and text-to-911 visited the University of Indianapolis campus Wednesday to make sure students know alcohol-related deaths are preventable. Help is available.

State Sen. Jim Merritt (R-Indianapolis) and State Treasurer Kelly Mitchell spoke, along with University Police Chief David Selby, Student Government President Jason Marshall and Make Good Decisions Advocate Stevan Stankovich.

“We’ve saved 43 lives to date (that we know of) because of the Lifeline Law,” said Merritt. “Everyone makes mistakes, but we’re here to encourage students to make good decisions when it really matters.”

Alcohol poisoning kills a college-aged person every 44 hours, according to Indiana Youth Services Association’s Make Good Decisions campaign. Indiana’s Lifeline Law provides legal protection for underage drinking and many alcohol-related offenses for minors, for a person who texts or calls 911, and for the person(s) assisting, to report a medical emergency.

Stankovich spoke about an incident that happened nine years ago when he was a college freshman at Wabash College. A fraternity brother, Johnny Smith, came home extremely intoxicated, and Stankovich was tasked with watching over him throughout the night. Although the brothers were concerned about him, they decided not to call 911 and instead rolled him on his side to sleep it off.

The next morning, Smith was unresponsive. The boys tried CPR, called for an ambulance, and watched as he left the house in a body bag.

“I didn’t realize people could die from drinking too much,” Stankovich recalled. “I felt responsible for his death and I fell into a depression fueled by guilt. I still feel terrible, because this was completely preventable.”

Selby reminded students of a University motto: “If you see something, say something. You never know when your actions could save a life.”

The most important things for students to know:

  • Know the signs of alcohol poisoning, which include unusual confusion, repeated vomiting, loss of bodily functions and pale or bluish skin. See a complete list of warning signs here.
  • If you’re concerned about someone who drank too much, you should call 911 or text 911 immediately for help. Make sure to include your location in the text message.

 

Lebanon student earns prestigious Richard G. Lugar Award

Julia Garrard

Julia Garrard

A senior from Lebanon High School earned the 2017 Sen. Richard G. Lugar Distinguished Student Leadership Award.

Julia N. Garrard will receive the $1,000 award from Lugar on Saturday, Dec. 9, during the 41st annual Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow’s Leaders at Ransburg Auditorium at the University of Indianapolis. The event gathers more than 400 of Indiana’s top high school juniors at the University for an expert discussion on pressing public issues and world events. Lugar will deliver a keynote address at 10 a.m.

“I am honored and humbled to receive the 2017 Richard G. Lugar Distinguished Student Leadership Award,” said Garrard, who will give a short acceptance speech at the symposium. “I understand, however, that this is not a reward for past achievements but rather an investment in my future contributions to the public good. I look forward to rising to this challenge.”

The highly competitive award honors students for academic success, leadership and a proven commitment to serving others. Each applicant must complete an application and draft an essay on one of three topics. Garrard chose to describe an example of how she showed courage while demonstrating leadership.

In her essay, Garrard discussed her experience as an exchange student in Germany, where she taught the German language to refugees who were fleeing violence in the Middle East and settling in Germany. She taught language lessons in a refugee camp, which she described as doing her “little part in the midst of this humanitarian catastrophe to build goodwill abroad for my country.”

Kevin O’Rourke, principal at Lebanon High School, wrote in the award application about Garrard: “Julia is very committed to being a servant leader. She is incredibly active in our school and community in the service she provides to others.”

The activities in which Garrard is involved include:

  • Student Council President
  • Exchange student to Germany
  • Thirst Project
  • Mayor’s Youth Council
  • United Way volunteer
  • Lebanon Mentors Club

About the Lugar Academy

More than 15,000 promising students have participated in the Lugar Symposium during the past 40 years, including nearly 500 students last year, gaining wisdom, insight and access to some of the finest minds available. Principals from every high school in Indiana are asked to select three outstanding student leaders from their junior class to attend the Symposium. Lugar is a Distinguished Trustee, a former professor of political science and holds an honorary degree from the University of Indianapolis. The symposium that bears his name was launched in 1977 as an opportunity to discuss with students topics of local and global importance.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private, liberal arts university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top Midwest Universities by the U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of more than 5,500 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 109 undergraduate degrees, more than 37 master’s degree programs and six doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs also in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.”

Faculty mentors inspire history grad to pursue Stanford doctorate

Lauren Judd, UIndy undergraduate and master's degree holder, is headed to Stanford to pursue her PhD in History. She poses for photos in the Krannert Memorial Library on Wednesday, May 24, 2017. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Lauren Judd ’17 (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Lauren Judd ‘17 (M.A., history) was delighted to find one-on-one mentorship at the University of Indianapolis that allowed her to customize her field of study and pursue unique, hands-on work opportunities.

Lauren Judd first came to the University of Indianapolis knowing she’d have to get used to the academic spotlight. At Arizona State University, she had blended in with hundreds of students in larger classes.

“I’m not someone who likes to raise my hand and talk in class. I didn’t feel like I needed a lot of one-on-one attention,” she explained, adding that her UIndy instructors quickly put her at ease in the classroom.

“The professors wanted to challenge you, so it wasn’t easy, but they also wanted to create a comfortable enough environment that you felt safe stretching and growing. It was never intimidating. They’re just committed to helping you succeed,” she added.

Looking back to May 2017, Judd now credits that personal attention to her success in landing a full-ride scholarship as a doctoral student at Stanford University, ranked among the top five in the U.S. News & Report’s Best Colleges. Today, she’s excited to explore her future because of the encouragement of mentors such as UIndy faculty members Jim Williams and Ted Frantz. Rather than discouraging her from pursuing her interest in medieval history, Frantz and Williams fueled her passions and supported her interests with new opportunities.

“They were aware that my focus was a little bit different. They didn’t want to force me to research the same things the other students were interested in,” Judd said.

Judd’s thesis, “Crossing Boundaries: Female Saints, Heretics and Ecclesiastical Authority in Late Medieval Europe,” focuses on women’s spirituality in the Late Middle Ages and the factors that led to some women being labeled as heretics as the church sought to reinforce its authority.

“Dr. Williams [executive director of the Ron and Laura Strain Honors College] was very invested in helping me do what I wanted to do. When it came time to do my thesis, he coached me through the whole thing,” Judd said. “I had a lot of one-on-one attention from him that I wouldn’t have had if I had gone to a larger school.”

Williams, associate professor of history, added: “Like all our master’s students, Lauren was exposed to a broad curriculum that grew her appreciation of different periods of history, but she also had a particular interest for medieval history.” said Williams.  

Judd had the opportunity to attend the Midwest Medieval History Conference, which sparked her passion for the subject as she saw the diversity of interesting work available to medieval scholars.

“Several months later, after she completed her master’s thesis, she realized she could contribute to that work, too,” Williams said.

Frantz, professor of history and director of the Institute for Civic Leadership & Mayoral Archives, suggested Judd take a position working with the University archivist, Mark Vopelak. She also helped to organize the Richard M. Fairbanks Symposium on Civic Leadership at the University of Indianapolis, hosted by the Institute. Her work included curating an online exhibit on public art and producing podcasts.

The goal, Frantz said, is to provide students with a wide variety of experiences to help them discover their natural aptitudes. In the end, it was those transformative experiences that led her to continue her education at Stanford University.

“I’m simply thrilled that UIndy helped nurture this remarkable talent,” Frantz said. “Teaching and working with Lauren was a joy. She is a gifted writer, a tireless worker and someone who is willing to go the extra mile. Getting to work with her, and see her develop throughout her time here, was a treasure.”

As her time at UIndy neared its end, Judd said her mentors gently nudged her toward pursuing graduate school. She learned later those relationships (and letters of recommendation) played a significant role in her being accepted to Stanford, along with her academic success.

As she embarks on this next chapter in her journey, Judd says she always will appreciate those people and programs at UIndy that helped shape her future. The next generation of students should embrace similar opportunities, she said.

“My mentors will be building on things I love about this program. They are invested in your success,” she said.

 

 

 

Students win awards at 2017 Model United Nations Summit

A team of 15 students from the University of Indianapolis won several awards recently during the Model United Nations Summit competition.

The Model UN is a simulation exercise organized by the Indiana Consortium for International Programs. Several universities from Indiana and Kentucky participated this year at the summit, which was hosted Nov. 9-11 at Indiana University Southeast in New Albany, Ind.

Summit participants competed in two separate groups. Topics discussed included North Korea, nuclear weapons and missile delivery systems, Syrian and Yemen conflicts and climate change as a global security issue. The participating UIndy students major in international relations and/or political science.

Results of the first group competition included:

  • Dan Miller (political science): Third-Best Delegate
  • Brittany Motley (criminal justice and political science) and Dan Miller (political science): Third-Best Delegation, representing the United States

Results of the second group competition included:

  • Dominic Peretin (history): Second-Best Delegation, representing the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland and Third-Best Delegate
  • Tosin Salau (international relations and political science) and Mary Anne Schneider (history education): Fourth-Best Delegation, representing France

Jyotika Saksena, associate professor with the department of history and political science, helped the students prepare for the event.

“This is a very important learning tool for the students,” she explained. “They not only study important topics facing the world today but learn to see these different issues from specific perspectives. The simulation teaches students to negotiate with those of a different point of view without antagonizing them, the art of diplomacy and public speaking skills.”

Congratulations to each UIndy participant: Katie McDonald (political science and international relations), Zion Lutz (political science), Tosin Salau (international relations and political science), Mary Anne Schneider (history education), Nkechi Nnachetta (political science), Erin O’Riley (international relations and political science), Kiley Harmon (international relations and political science), Melissa Kapsalis (psychology and political science), Dominic Peretin (history), Brittany Motley (criminal justice and political science), Dan Miller (political science), Heather Reid (history and international relations), Ben Osborn (political science), Aml Alkhatib (political science), Tobiloba Olakunle (international relations and political science)

 

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