Alumnus designs Good Hall model for 2017 holiday card

Visual communication design graduate Daniel Del Real ’05 offered his creative talents for this year’s University of Indianapolis holiday card.

Daniel Del Real Good Hall was an easy subject choice for Del Real—it’s where he held his first public art show during his senior year and he attended classes there every semester as a student as well.

“UIndy has managed to keep that tradition going today,” Del Real said. “All students are still going into this building for classes during their time on campus.”

While designing the card, Del Real built a scale model of Good Hall and adorned the building with miniature holiday decorations, ribbons on the columns and artificial snow. He even provided lighting on the inside of the model. He said he drew his inspiration from a card he received from a friend depicting a Christmas village. Once the model was finished, he photographed it for the University’s holiday card.

“It’s really wonderful to give back to the University,” Del Real said. “My fours years at UIndy were some of the best years of my life. So, to see that it has come full circle, I was glad to create this for UIndy.”

Del Real explained his biggest challenge was getting the proportions right. To do this, he said he measured the windows on several images provided by the University to assign a scale for each detail of the building, including the bricks, molding, columns and steps. Watch this short video to hear about his creative process.  

Because renovations are underway to restore Good Hall’s two-story portico and six columns at the main entrance, Del Real said, “this is an opportunity for incoming students to really see the potential of the building with the portico.”

The scale model of Good Hall will be on display at the Krannert Memorial Library following the holiday break.

Del Real is the resident artist at the International Marketplace Coalition, working to forge relationships between businesses, community and artists through public art programs and installations that enrich the International Marketplace neighborhood on Indy’s northwest side.

He received the University’s Distinguished Young Alumni Award at the Honors & Recognition Dinner in September. He also partnered with current students to create greyhound vignettes that were on display at that Homecoming event.

Professor explores 3D printing in occupational therapy

img_4918In April 2016, the University of Indianapolis launched its first #UIndyDay effort with the identification of several projects alumni and friends could contribute to. One of those projects, and the one that garnered the highest amount of contributions, was a 3D printer for the School of Occupational Therapy.

Now, two years later, Erin Peterson, assistant professor of occupational therapy, is leading the school’s efforts to determine how to best use the technology to enhance OT education for both master’s and doctoral students. At Peterson’s recommendation, the school purchased a Maker Gear M3 printer in the summer of 2017.

“We wanted something that isn’t noisy, because it’s used in a classroom and prints can sometimes take a few hours to complete,” Peterson said. “We also were looking for the newest technology and good user reviews.”

img_4910Since the arrival of the 3D printer, Peterson has been partnering with the School of Engineering to collaborate on designs for assistive devices and anatomical models that can be 3D printed. Along with the 3D printer, SOT purchased a 3D scanner that takes multiple pictures of a 3D object. The user can then edit and manipulate the 3D model of the object using special software. In OT, this could allow a therapist to scan a person’s hand, arm, or other body part, upload the file to the software, and then design a custom orthosis around that body part.

Peterson admits that the technology has raised some concerns among the OT community. In particular, many hand therapists have expressed concern that 3D printing splints or assistive devices takes the OT out of the equation.

An OT student research group recently conducted a survey of occupational therapists’ perceptions about the use of 3D technology in the practice of occupational therapy. Those survey findings, based on approximately 300 responses from members of the American Society of Hand Therapists, will be presented at the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Annual Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah in April 2018.

There are other uses for 3D technology besides orthoses and assistive devices. For instance, Peterson noted that one study suggests that 3D-printed pillboxes may improve adherence to medication because they can be customized to the patient’s needs (adequate size, security, slots per day, etc.) Peterson is currently exploring the idea of offering a 3D printing in occupational therapy elective in the occupational therapy curriculum. She is also involved in networking discussions with faculty from other occupational therapy schools to understand how the technology can enhance both OT education and OT
practice.

University of Indianapolis faculty highlight migrant death crisis in new book

Latham’s work has brought national attention to the humanitarian crisis happening at the border.

Latham’s work has brought national attention to the humanitarian crisis happening at the U.S. southern border.

A unique new book by University of Indianapolis faculty sheds light on the migrant death crisis in the Texas Borderlands by discussing the circumstances that force people to flee their home countries to seek refuge in the United States – despite the perilous journey. The book also explores the reasons why migrant deaths have reached mass disaster proportions and the techniques employed by forensic scientists to locate and identify the dead.

“Sociopolitics of Migrant Death and Repatriation: Perspectives from Forensic Science” by Krista Latham, associate professor of biology and anthropology, and Alyson O’Daniel, assistant professor of anthropology, explores the migrant death crisis at the U.S. southern border, along with the forensic techniques utilized in this humanitarian crisis. The book focuses on situating the migrant death crisis and response within a broader sociopolitical framework by highlighting the challenges faced by forensic scientists working in this context and the techniques used by cultural anthropologists to contextualize the crisis.
 


“Sociopolitics of Migrant Death and Repatriation” includes chapters written by experts actively working on these issues and discusses how historically-driven conditions of social inequality, resource allocation and policy implementation have contributed to the crisis unfolding along the border today. Latham and O’Daniel organized a symposium based on the book at the 37th Annual Mountain, Desert & Coastal Forensic Anthropologists Meeting in 2017, where the work of ten of the contributing authors was presented and discussed.

“The main focus of the book is to better understand the crisis and the forensic science response as shaped and constrained by broad, systems-level processes of power,” said Latham, who also serves as the director of the University of Indianapolis Human Identification Center.

Latham’s work has brought national attention to the humanitarian crisis happening at the border. Latham and her graduate students on the University of Indianapolis Forensics Team have been working to uncover remains from unmarked grave sites and identify the bodies of those who have died while making the journey to the United States since 2013. In 2017, five Human Biology graduate students, two Anthropology undergraduate students and colleague O’Daniel traveled to Texas with Latham to participate in the project, and in January 2018, she will return to the area with another group of graduate students. (Read more about the project here.)

“Sociopolitics of Migrant Death and Repatriation” introduces readers to some of the forensic science techniques utilized in the migrant identifications, including forensic archaeology to recover the bodies and DNA analysis as a means of positive identification, among other techniques.

“Our authors together have traced how global and local political economic relationships shape what happens to marginalized migrants in life and in death. The picture that emerges is profoundly troubling, but it is not without hope and not without dedicated individuals who are indeed taking action,” O’Daniel said.

In restoring the names and memories of migrants whose identities would otherwise be unknown, Latham said the goal is to create a record that one day will work toward change and social justice.

“As professionals in forensic science, we are able to tell stories and document inequalities that may otherwise go unheard and unnoticed by the vast majority of Americans,” Latham said. “We see the imprints of  lifelong poverty on their bones and teeth. We see the love they have for their families in the photos and notes recovered in their pockets. We document the places they die and bear witness to the fact that these deaths are happening in staggering numbers.”

Follow Latham’s work in Texas here.


 

University of Indianapolis Class of 2017 encouraged to pursue passions

The University of Indianapolis held the inaugural December Commencement Ceremony on Saturday before a capacity crowd in Ransburg Auditorium.

Nearly 260 students graduated from the University in December, including 203 undergraduates, 50 graduate and 4 doctoral students. The total number of University of Indianapolis graduates for 2017 (May and December combined) stands at nearly 1,700 students from 24 countries, with 1,235 undergraduates, nearly 500 graduate and doctoral students, and 136 graduates at international partner sites.

President Rob L. Manuel encouraged graduates to seek balance, truth and engagement in their lives through creativity and passion. He also emphasized the importance of humor, humility and community when facing new challenges.

“I’ve seen the growth in your world views and your ability to engage with the most pressing questions of our time and to care for others in the process. I hope that in your time here, you learned not only what you want to be, but who you want to be,” Manuel said.

The ceremony included a full academic procession, musical performances by University faculty and the National Anthem performed by Kyleigh (Randolph) Hernandez ’17, (music education).

Congressman Andre Carson (D-IN) delivered the keynote address. He noted that it was a day of new beginnings and opportunities.

“The degree you’ll receive today is physical proof of the skills you’ve developed at the University of Indianapolis. It truly is an American commitment to better yourselves that will set the course for the rest of your lives. All of you had the determination and hope that you would succeed and that’s what’s central to making this country great,” Carson said.

Rep. Andre Carson (D-IN)

Rep. Andre Carson (D-IN)

Carson urged graduates to follow their passion. “Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive,” he said. “It’s important that you continue to carry your mantels of success not only for yourselves but for your loved ones. By doing so you remain true to yourself and to those who love you the most.”

Jason Marshall, Indianapolis Student Government president, also served as a featured speaker. President Manuel credited Marshall and other student government leaders for their work in organizing the December Commencement Ceremony, which marks a new University tradition.

“We all have the capabilities and power to pursue our goals, to be successes in each of our individual endeavors – and how lucky we are to have obtained not only a degree, but a degree from the University of Indianapolis,” Marshall said.

President Manuel urged graduates to be confident in their professional pursuits.

2017_dec_grad__11331“Believe that you belong at the table where the most critical decisions are being made about our collective realities. You have a unique world perspective and a unique set of skills to employ in solving those issues,” he said.

He also encouraged new alumni to stay connected with the UIndy family.

“You’re not just a graduate from UIndy. You’re now and forever a part of our story,” Manuel said.

 

 

 

Honors College students present research at national conference

Back row: Kaity Sullivan ’18, Lauren Bryant ’18, Casey Wendorff ’18, Dierra Barlow ’20, Zoe Cunningham ’20 & Jim Williams, associate professor of history and director of the Honors College. Front row: Sierra Corbin '18 and Delmar Oropeza '18.

Back row: Kaity Sullivan ’18, Lauren Bryant ’18, Casey Wendorff ’18, Dierra Barlow ’20, Zoe Cunningham ’20 & Jim Williams, associate professor of history and director of the Honors College. Front row: Sierra Corbin ’18 and Delmar Oropeza ’18.

Students in the Ron & Laura Strain Honors College recently participated in the National Collegiate Honors Council (NCHC) Conference in Atlanta, a national event to showcase the benefits of honors education and research.

Casey Wendorff ’18 (biology, chemistry minor), Kaity Sullivan ’18 (accounting and mathematics) Sierra Corbin ’17 (biology, chemistry minor) and Delmar Oropeza ’17 (biology, chemistry minor, pre-pharmacy concentration) presented research posters. Dierra Barlow ’20 (theatre, psychology) and Zoe Cunningham ’20 (theatre) performed in a drama master class. Lauren Bryant ’18 (biology and psychology) acted as a moderator during the conference.

Jim Williams, director of the Honors College and associate professor of history, led several sessions on Honors advising. He highlighted the unique experience for students to travel to a national conference and represent the University of Indianapolis.

“It allows them to showcase the hard work they’ve done on their original scholarship, which is great for their professionalization, and they see the kind of work honors students and colleges are doing across the country,” Williams said.

Sierra Corbin, left, and Delmar Oropeza

Sierra Corbin, left, and Delmar Oropeza

Corbin and Oropeza received a research grant from the Sigma Zeta National Honor Society and presented their results at the conference. The grant funded materials critical to their project, which set out to determine a procedure to test for a genetic marker for the taste preference of cilantro.

“The experience at the conference was beneficial. We received feedback from judges so that we could improve our skills presenting scientific research. It also was quite interesting to see what other students around the United States study,” Corbin said.

The students worked with Sandra Davis, associate professor of biology, who suggested the idea.

“I really enjoy watching students go from doing simple lab activities as part of a class to taking ownership of their own project.  This is one of the opportunities that UIndy is able to offer that students might not get at a larger school. I hope to use their project in my classes and I have already had faculty from other universities express interest in using it as well,” Davis said.

Learn more about the Ron & Laura Strain Honors College at UIndy.

Corbin said the Honors College’s focus on presentations helped her develop skills in explaining complex topics to an audience that may not have specific knowledge of that subject. Her career goal is to become a physician assistant.

“I am sure I will need to explain to patients what an illness may be, what caused it and how to treat it,” she said.

The research component of Honors College also was integral to their skills development, the students said.

“The research experience and the Honors College in general allowed me to expand my learning and communicative capabilities, especially in public speaking. There was a lot of reading and interpretation of papers that took place, which allowed me to expand my analytical intake,” said Oropeza, who plans to attend pharmacy school following graduation in December.

“At UIndy, the teachers genuinely care about our academic success. Some of our courses definitely are harder than they would be at other schools, but that makes us more prepared,” Corbin said.



Tomorrow’s leaders explore international affairs with former Senator Lugar

More than 400 high school students from across Indiana soaked in valuable insight on the most pressing issues of our time during a special presentation by former Sen. Richard G. Lugar, who hosted an annual leadership symposium at the University of Indianapolis.

More than 60 Hoosier counties were represented at the 41st annual Richard G. Lugar Symposium for Tomorrow’s Leaders, hosted in December 2017 by the Lugar Academy at the University. The tradition allows select high school students to hear from one of the most distinguished minds on policy and domestic and global affairs.

“I look forward to this event each year because I am able to interact with students interested in leadership and making a difference,” said Lugar, a Distinguished Trustee at the University. “These are some of the next great leaders in Indiana and perhaps the country.”

“I hope to help spark the thought that would lead to them running for office or taking some public office for service one day,” Lugar added.

Julia Garrard, a senior from Lebanon High School, was honored by Lugar as this year’s recipient of the Richard G. Lugar Distinguished Student Leadership Award. The $1,000 award recognizes one Indiana high school senior each year for leadership and community service activities.

From partisan politics and climate change to trade agreements and immigration, Lugar provided insight on many of the hot-button issues facing society today. He agreed partisanship continues to be a major stumbling block to the legislative progress, but he said this is not a new phenomenon: The difference today is the power of special interests overshadowing the constituencies of elected officials.

Lugar often mentioned the work of the Lugar Center, a think tank group that issues the Bipartisan Index each year to rank Congress members on how often they work across party lines.

The 85-year-old Lugar, who served for 36 years in the U.S. Senate (including as a leader on the Committee on Foreign Affairs), led a spirited Q and A session, touching on many topics important to young people. Among his messages: Manmade climate change is real. International trade is critical for international relations. DACA children should be protected. North Korea is an extreme danger to the world.

President Robert L. Manuel praised Lugar for his continued commitment to the next generation of leaders and to the University. Lugar is a former professor of political science and holds a honorary degree from the University of Indianapolis.

December 2017 graduation: Josie Seach

josieseachJosie Seach is continuing a family tradition by attending the University of Indianapolis, with a major in literary studies and a minor in computer science. Her mother and grandmother both graduated from the University, and Josie will follow in their footsteps in December 2017. We talked with her about her plans after graduation and how her campus experiences (including her work with the University’s Marketing & Communications Department) prepared her to take the next step.

Q. What’s next after graduation?

A. I’m particularly interested in using digital marketing tools to assist nonprofits, especially those related to the arts, technology, and literacy. Long-term, I hope to either continue on this path or obtain a Master of Library and Information Science or Master’s in Human-Computer Interaction and find work that allows me to help with others’ literacy, both traditional verbal literacy and information/technology literacy.

Q. I heard that you will get some recognition from Etchings magazine! Could you tell me a little more about that?

A. Yes, I submitted three poems, and all three were selected for publication. This is my first time being published anywhere, and also my first time getting into Etchings. I’ve submitted art and other pieces in the past that were not selected. I had hoped to get into the magazine before graduating, and I’m glad to have gotten the chance to see that wish through. I wrote and refined the poems with the help of a workshop class, and it’s fulfilling to see that work recognized.

Q. Tell me about your experience working in the UIndy communications and marketing department.

A. Working for this department has given me the insight and tools I’ll need to succeed in other marketing or writing jobs, and I now feel confident in applying for these sorts of positions, not only because of the wonderful opportunity to work in marketing, but also because of the numerous other opportunities I’ve had, like editing for Etchings and tutoring in the Writing Lab. I was able to attend an academic conference and present one of my literary research papers. Another class gave me the freedom to research something I believe could be used practically—I studied an informal, online community of librarians, and used this precedent to launch research on ways a library might be able to utilize social media to reach and assist patrons.

Q. Was there anyone at UIndy who mentored you?

A. My department has gone above and beyond helping me succeed. Every professor has been so supportive, even before I declared a major in the English department. I want to especially thank Dr. (Molly) Martin and Dr. (Jennifer) Camden for working with me to form a plan when I realized that a class I needed to graduate conflicted with a class for my minor, as well as when I later realized that I needed to add a class to fulfill an elective requirement. Had they not been so generous with their assistance, I would have needed to wait another semester to graduate.

Q. Looking back on your time at UIndy, do you have any advice for incoming freshmen?

A. I think a lot of freshmen worry about their futures when they begin college, especially those who haven’t decided on a major yet. There’s a debate on whether to pick something lucrative or to pick something you love; I feel there doesn’t need to be a mutual exclusion there. Pick something you’re good at and interested in, and there will be ways to apply what you learn. Give yourself time to figure out your strengths, play those strengths up, and work with the University to find opportunities to apply your skills and education.

 

Read about other 2017 December graduates.

Learn about 2017 December graduation

Meet the December 2017 graduates!

About 150 students will walk in the first formal winter commencement ceremony on Saturday, December 16 in Ransburg Auditorium. Indiana Rep. Andre Carson will deliver the keynote speech and the program will be streamed online at uindy.edu/graduation.

Click on the photos below to learn about some of the December graduates, and what’s next for each of them.

December 2017 Graduation: Meet Jason Marshall

jasonmarshallChances are you’ve seen Jason Marshall ’17 (political science, legal studies minor, pre-law concentration) around campus. He’s president of Indianapolis Student Government and the Pre-Law Student Association (as well as precinct committeeman for Spiceland’s second district–his hometown!)

Q. What groups or activities have you been involved in on campus?

A. I have participated as a Greyhound Ambassador for the Admissions Office, a member of the Student Athlete Advisory Committee, served two years as Indianapolis Student Government president and created the Pre-Law Student Association, where I have served for two years as president. Not only have these experiences been fun, but being involved on campus helped me to understand what my passions are and have helped me develop a true sense of service. Being the student body president has given me the opportunity to give back to a school that has offered so much to me, and I hope what I have done benefits current and future Greyhounds!

Q. Could you talk about your internships and how they helped you develop your professional skills?

A. I began my first internship as a freshman with the Marion County Democratic Party, where I gained valuable office and professional skills in communication and programming. Following that internship, I began to work with Hannah News Service Midwest as a senior intern tracking legislation at the Indiana Statehouse and gained fundamental skills and knowledge in the workings of the state government and working with clients in a professional manner. This past summer I interned in Washington, D.C., for Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-IN) where I gained knowledge in federal government and valuable skills in research and writing.

Q. What are your plans after graduation?

A. Following graduation, I will be an office manager for Hannah News Service during session at the Statehouse and will then continue my education in fall 2018 at Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law.

Q. Is there anyone at UIndy who influenced or helped you during your academic career?

A. The faculty and staff are great mentors and always supportive of the students. [Dean of Students] Kory Vitangeli and President [Rob] Manuel work diligently for the students, and they have been awesome in supporting student government and the student body. Dr. David Root (political science) and Dr. Laura Wilson (political science) are incredible professors with fun classes and are always ready to help students.

Q. Why would you recommend the political science program?

A. The political science department is by far an excellent program, and I highly recommend the program to anyone interested in any form of government. The professors are personable and always ready to assist students with classwork, but also to find internships and careers that fit the students.

Q. What would your advice be to incoming freshmen?

A. My advice to any incoming freshman is to become involved on campus and in the city. The friendships, skills and networks you gain early on will become so vital in anything you pursue. Getting involved is a fun way to spend your time outside of class doing something you enjoy! Also, get your readings done!

Q. Final thoughts before graduation?

A. UIndy has been an incredible school for me, both intellectually and socially. I feel, as I leave, that I am well prepared to pursue my goals, and UIndy has put me in a position to do so.

 

Read about other 2017 December graduates.

Learn about 2017 December graduation

December 2017 Graduation: Meet Annie Barton

anniebartonAnnie Barton ’17 (M.A., educational leadership) ’13 (elementary education) is a special education teacher at Christel House Academy South who is using her qualifications to advance her teaching career. With her master’s degree, she plans to work as an instructional coach, assistant principal and one day lead as principal of a school in the Indianapolis area.  

Q. What made you decide to enroll in the University of Indianapolis’ educational leadership program? 

A. I decided to enroll for the Education Leadership Program (iLEAD) because I knew that the level of preparation I would receive would be top-notch. The structured experiences have given me the opportunities to grow in my own school and visit other schools as well. The number of relationships built during this process have been outstanding and greatly increased the size of my professional network. Through the projects and assignments I have had a chance to shadow and perform leadership tasks in my own building. I can confidently take on a new role as a school leader.

Q. Describe your work experience since obtaining your bachelor’s degree in elementary education.

A. The opportunities I had as an undergraduate helped me to work a maternity leave in Warren Township immediately following graduation. I was hired on at Christel House Academy South to work their summer school program that following June. Near the end of summer school, I was offered a position as the K-3 special education teacher. Currently, I still work as the K-3 special education teacher in addition to serving as lead teacher for the kindergarten and first grade teachers. I was able to implement my coursework consistently at CHA, from analyzing data and creating a long-term plan to increase student achievement to providing professional development on special education.     

Q. What specific skills in this program will help you achieve your future career goals?

A. In this program, we gain experience with educational laws, working with school finance, using data to inform school goals, professional development and leadership – all the pieces we need to be a successful school leader are provided during the course of the five semesters.

Q. Were there any faculty, staff or students at the University who made a strong impression on you or helped you along the way?

A. This program has a great structure where we completed fieldwork activities for each semester coordinated by [iLEAD Field Coordinator] Lynn Wheeler (assistant professor of teacher education). We consistently had her support throughout the entire program and built extremely strong relationships. My fellow cohort members were talking just last night about how it was a bittersweet feeling to complete our final fieldwork conference calls this semester.

Q. Would you recommend this program to prospective students?

A. I would absolutely recommend this program. This program will push you to become a better version of yourself. You will leave accomplishing projects and work that you could not imagine doing on day one. The curriculum and teachers are consistently updated to ensure they are producing graduates prepared to what real life leading expects. I am so thankful for my time at UIndy.

Q. Overall, would you recommend the University of Indianapolis?

A. UIndy is a fantastic place to be. It is a tight-knit community that is always working to be ahead of the game. The professors are supportive and the relationships you build are long-lasting. It seems I have focused on relationships a lot, but they are so powerful when looking forward in life and your career. To this day, I am welcomed back on campus with open arms. Forever a Greyhound!

 

Read about other 2017 December graduates.

Learn about 2017 December graduation

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