UIndy gears up for Welcome Week

The University of Indianapolis begins Welcome Week with Move-In Day on Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017. Some 1,100 freshmen – UIndy’s largest class ever – will join the Greyhound student body for the fall semester.

The University will welcome more than 5,700 students for the fall 2017 semester, with more than 3,800 undergraduates, 450 School for Adult Learning undergraduates and 1,400 graduate students.

The University also welcomes more than 200 international students who represent roughly 30 countries. UIndy’s largest representations hail from China, Saudi Arabia and Canada. Other countries represented include: Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Belgium, Benin, Bermuda, Brazil, Cameroon, Chile, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Indiana, Indonesia, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Latvia, Liberia, Mexico, Nepal, Netherlands, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Peru, Poland, Romania, Russia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom and Zimbabwe.

Aug. 23: Move-In Day

Move-In Day is an all-hands-on-deck event that showcases the campus community as UIndy faculty and staff pitch in to help families move their students into the dorms. Students whose last names begin with A-L should arrive between 8 and 9:30 a.m. on Aug. 23 at their assigned dorm; students with names beginning M-Z should arrive between 9:30 and 11 a.m.

International students will check in from 9 a.m. to noon on Wednesday. Commuter student check-in and lunch will be held from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

First year students and families are encouraged to attend lunch on Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Schwitzer Student Center. First year students are required to attend convocation at 2 p.m. in Nicoson Hall on Wednesday. Families are encouraged, but not required, to attend. Faculty and staff will cheer for the Class of 2021 as they enter Key Stadium following convocation to take the Class of 2021 class photo.

“The past years we have created a tradition of clapping and cheering for the entering class following the convocation, similar to the faculty line-up at commencement.  This year’s event will mirror the tradition for both new students and families,” said Kory Vitangeli, dean of students.

Following convocation, student-only sessions begin at 4 p.m. Commuter student meetings will be held in UIndy Hall in the Schwitzer Student Center at 4 p.m.

Move-In Day events (afternoon and evening):

4:30 – 5 p.m.: Dinner with the Crimson Crew, Smith Mall
The Crimson Crew, comprising returning students, will lead small groups throughout the week to answer questions, give tips for success and help new students get comfortable on campus.

5 – 7:30 p.m.: Dinner and Safety Presentation, Dining Hall and Nicoson Hall
Group A: Safety Presentation at 5 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m. (Cory Bretz, Central, Crowe, East and Roberts)
Group B: Dinner at 5 p.m., Safety Presentation at 6:30 p.m. (Warren, Cravens and commuters)

8 – 9 p.m. Playfair, Smith Mall (Rain location: ARC)
Get to know other classmates with an energy-packed hour. This memorable event, sponsored by the Office of Student Affairs, is not to be missed!

11 p.m. – 1a.m. Midnight Madness, Target (meet at Bell Tower)
Catch the shuttle starting at 11 p.m. at the Bell Tower near Ransburg Auditorium. Student IDs are required as Target is staying open exclusively for UIndy! Enjoy music, prizes and fun will getting any last-minute items needed for the school year. (Sponsored by Residence Hall Association)

Returning students will arrive between Friday, Aug. 25 and Sunday, Aug. 28th. Hall desks will be open from 8 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to midnight on Sunday.

Click here for the entire Welcome Week schedule.

Parking permits can be obtained all week in the Student Business Center (Schwitzer 207) from 8:00 AM-5:00 PM. . Students must have their ID cards, license plate # and year of expiration, and the make of model of their vehicle with them to receive a permit.

Simulation exercise helps students focus on interprofessional teamwork

A man suddenly slips and falls in the stands at a basketball game at Nicoson Hall. He groans in pain as concerned onlookers jump to action. Athletic trainers quickly take their places around the patient and begin calling out instructions to protect his spine and head.

The sequence of events that follows–from the ambulance ride to the emergency room to post-trauma care and communication between medical professionals–plays out in a tightly choreographed event as trained health sciences students at the University of Indianapolis participate in a simulated emergency response scenario. The exercise allows the students a “real-life” opportunity to implement the interprofessional and collaborative training that is integral to today’s trending model of healthcare.

There’s a big push in all of our professions to work more interprofessionally. By giving students the opportunity to do that, that helps them to be more prepared for fieldwork, clinicals or internships,” said Alison Nichols, assistant professor of occupational therapy, one of several faculty members who helped to organize the simulation.

The carefully designed simulation provided students of several disciplines–nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training, psychology and social work–a chance to collaborate at all levels of an emergency scenario. In this case, the patient simulated a serious injury at a campus event and was transported from Nicoson Hall to the UIndy Health Pavilion before being treated in the UIndy Simulation Center. Students coordinated the entire emergency response and treatment plan.

“I was amazed at how important it was for us to speak with each other and to know what each other was doing at all times. By communicating with each other, we could avoid repetition and streamline things for the patient,” said Mimi Chase ’19, a graduate student in social work.

That collaboration is an integral part of the unique and innovative partnership between Community Health Network and the University. Through an interprofessional and team-based approach to learning, students enter the workforce with beneficial experience of collaborating with a variety of healthcare specialities to best meet the patient’s needs amid an increasingly complex healthcare system.

“You are teaching students to look outside the boxes of their professions and look at the other members of the team so that they understand each other’s roles,” said Gurinder Hohl, director, UIndy-Community Health Network partnership.

Hohl explained how that philosophy can impact patient outcomes in a medical setting. Both from the patient and provider perspectives, it’s in everyone’s best interest to reduce hospital readmissions, she said. Effective communication across disciplines helps to improve that workflow.

“When a team is patient-centered, the added impact is that the patients manage their health better because they have resources that have been arranged for them,” Hohl said. If you don’t have that team-based handover, there are lost opportunities for patient care.”

Paige Buddenhagen ’19 and Jamal Edwards ’19, athletic training, worked on the patient in Nicoson before the ambulance arrived. Edwards was responsible for the patient’s head, which involved calling out instructions to his colleagues as they loaded the patient onto a spine board to avoid further injury, while Buddenhagen coordinated an ambulance.

“I definitely liked seeing the transition from EMS to nursing and how that all works,” Buddenhagen said. “Recognizing and responding in an efficient manner is critical to the patient’s health.”

Once the patient was admitted to the hospital, occupational and physical therapy students had the opportunity to collaborate and evaluate the patient’s abilities and needs.  Social work and psychology students had new roles to play when alcohol turned up as a factor in the case. Carrie Dettmer ’18, a student in the accelerated nursing program, explained that the team setting gave her confidence.

“When I came upon a situation with substance abuse with this particular simulation patient, I knew that I had the backup of social work and psych coming in behind me,” Dettmer said.

Nurses collaborated with psychologists and social workers to determine the resources available to help the patient with addiction issues.

Michael Craven ’20, clinical psychology doctoral candidate, played the role of staff psychologist at the hospital during the simulation.

“It’s the direction healthcare is going. Being able to have practice, learning what it’s like to work side by side with physical therapists, occupational therapists, social workers, prepares us incredibly to be able to function in that environment,” Craven said.

New music faculty bring international success to classrooms and Indianapolis Quartet

The Department of Music in the Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences is proud to announce the addition of widely acclaimed violinist Joana Genova as visiting instructor of violin/viola and director of Chamber Music Initiatives. Joana brings a wealth of international success as a musician, both in Europe and the United States and will support the momentum of the Indianapolis Quartet, one of the Midwest’s premiere string ensembles.

Joana, who is excited to join the UIndy family, has an active career as a chamber musician, orchestral player, teacher, and soloist. She first began playing the violin at age 6 in her native Bulgaria and made her solo debut at the age of 12 with the Plovdiv Chamber Orchestra and later was named the top prizewinner of the National Competition in Bulgaria. She earned a bachelor’s degree in music at the Conservatory of Amsterdam and a master’s degree in chamber music at the Rotterdam Conservatory in the Netherlands. She also is a former concertmaster of the Amsterdam Bach Consort and a member of Amsterdam Sinfonietta.

Much like other faculty in the Department of Music, Joana will help to expose music students to career opportunities and insight through the lens of professional musicians who have earned acclaim across the world. She will teach applied violin/viola courses and will co-direct the Chamber Orchestra and Chamber Ensembles with her husband, Ariel Rudiakov, who is recognized internationally as a violist and conductor.

“The Department of Music has a rich history of working with international musicians of the highest caliber,” said University Provost Stephen H. Kolison, Jr. “Joana’s success and reputation will provide wonderful advantages for our students and support the continued growth of the Indianapolis Quartet as one of the most dynamic and influential musical ensembles in the Midwest.”

In addition to her faculty duties, Joana will infuse a unique sound and musicianship to the Indianapolis Quartet, now in its second year but already recognized as a collection of world-class talent and an elite string ensemble. The Quartet, through its strong partnership with the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, will continue its path to success and fulfill its vision as a prominent fixture in the national arts community. With funding support recently granted from the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation, the Quartet will continue to refine the artistic excellence of the ensemble by building on the repertoire of world-class music of the past, present, and future; performing in increasingly higher profile settings, and collaborating with musicians of the highest caliber. The Quartet’s goal is to enhance the cultural fabric of the city and region through both performance and educational outreach. 

She joins ISO concertmaster and violinist Zachary DePue, violist Michael Isaac Strauss and ISO principal cellist Austin Huntington in the Quartet. These musicians have earned international acclaim and are recognized among the most elite musicians in the region. After performing with Joana, Quartet members praised her musicianship and her professional and intelligent demeanor, which they said would help “raise the level of our artistry during this crucial time for The Indianapolis Quartet’s development.” The Quartet is next scheduled to perform in October.

UIndy welcomes 2017-18 Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellowships in Education Leadership

The University of Indianapolis welcomes the incoming class of the 2017-18 Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellowship in Education Leadership program, announced recently by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. This year’s class represents the fourth cohort at the University and is comprised of 21 current educators seeking careers as school leaders in Indiana. Through the national program, the University of Indianapolis is fulfilling the mission to grow the pipeline of education leaders for the state.

About the program
Developed by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the WW Indiana MBA Fellowship program was created to develop a new model in education leader preparation, equipping graduates to head changing 21st-century schools across the state. The University of Indianapolis launched the program in the State of Indiana in 2014.

“The UIndy MBA in Education Leadership presents an innovative interdisciplinary model of principal preparation that integrates best practices in both education and business within an educational context,” said Dr. John Somers, associate professor at the UIndy School of Education. “The program instills key business skills and competencies that will equip principals to serve as exemplary school leaders and enable them to advance to higher levels of administration within an evolving entrepreneurial education landscape.  To date, this model has produced nearly one hundred new leaders who are transforming Indiana schools through a more robust knowledge base and skill set. We applaud the Woodrow Wilson Foundation for their vision and ongoing support to enact a truly revolutionary education enterprise.”

As the WW Indiana MBA Fellowship program expands throughout the state, it charts a new course in education leader preparation. The WW Indiana MBA blends clinical practice in schools with innovative business school coursework, it ensures graduates have the knowledge and skills not only to guide schools and districts in a changing education environment, but also close achievement gaps between America’s lowest- and highest-performing schools and between the country’s top-performing schools and those around the world.

Indiana is one of three states, with New Mexico and Wisconsin, that currently offer the WW MBA Fellowships, which integrates graduate education coursework with an MBA curriculum tailored to school leaders’ needs. The Woodrow Wilson Foundation administers the programs in Indiana through the generous financial support of Lilly Endowment Inc.

Under the Woodrow Wilson model, Fellows take MBA courses with a specific focus on the education context. Offered through business schools in collaboration with education schools, the program is designed to prepare leaders who will drive innovation, expand the use of analytics and evidence-based practices, raise student performance to international standards, and improve the quality of school systems and teaching over time.

Unlike programs that recruit career changers from other fields to work in schools, the Woodrow Wilson MBA Fellowship is intended for education professionals nominated by their school districts or charter school leaders. Those school systems partner with participating universities to establish internal leadership talent pipelines and cultivate new leaders. Fellows selected have demonstrated effective leadership and will use their knowledge of the education context to help transform schools from within. Each Fellow receives a stipend, which covers full tuition, materials, and associated program expenses. In exchange, each Fellow agrees to serve in an approved school or district leadership role within the state for at least three years, with Foundation-supported mentoring.

The University of Indianapolis partners with a variety of area school districts and charter schools to develop partnerships that will sustain clinical placements, or in-school learning arrangements, and mentoring opportunities for WW MBA Fellows. Learn more about the program.

About the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation: Founded in 1945, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation (www.woodrow.org) identifies and develops the nation’s best minds to meet its most critical challenges. The Foundation supports its Fellows as the next generation of leaders shaping American society.

About the University of Indianapolis: Since 1902, the University of Indianapolis has been committed to education for service. Today, 5,400 students are enrolled in respected undergraduate, masters and doctoral programs in the health sciences, arts, sciences, business, education and engineering, with an average class size of 17 providing a student-centric interdisciplinary and experiential learning environment. Located minutes from downtown, UIndy is a community anchor, elevating quality of life for all while connecting students with the internships, culture, recreation and community service opportunities available in a vibrant metropolitan atmosphere. The recently launched Campaign for UIndy is advancing education as well as social mobility and the health of communities. More information is available at campaign.uindy.edu.

THE 2017-18 CLASS OF INDIANA MBA FELLOWS IN EDUCATION LEADERSHIP:

  • Brad Bates, Avon Community School Corporation
  • Tim Blom, Metropolitan School District of Washington Township
  • Weston Bonczek, Indianapolis Public Schools
  • Amy Conrad, Zionsville Community Schools
  • Melissa DeWeese, Western School Corporation
  • Mark DuBois, Huntington County Community School Corporation
  • Jeannie Hawkins, Elkhart Community Schools
  • Melissa Illuzzi, Anderson Community Schools
  • Alan Landes, Anderson Community Schools
  • Keith Manring, Metropolitan School District of Decatur Township
  • Seianna McCray, Concord Community Schools
  • Kellie McIntyre, Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation
  • Frank Meyer, Avon Community School Corporation
  • Nasreen McDowell, Center Grove Community School Corporation
  • Rebecca Pennington, Center Grove Community School Corporation
  • Matt Swaim, Hamilton Southeastern Schools
  • Tyler Thiems, Washington Township Schools
  • Miranda (Randi) Tolentino, Metropolitan School District of Decatur Township
  • Meranda VanderVeen, Center Grove Community School Corporation
  • Chris Wey, Metropolitan School District of Wayne Township
  • Brice Willey, Hamilton Southeastern Schools

 

UIndy Real Estate Development program hosts the Urban Land Institute

Event strengthens relationship between industry, graduate program

The Master of Professional Studies in Real Estate Development program at the University of Indianapolis hosted the Urban Land Institute for a cocktail and conversation hour on July 27. Strategic Capital Partners, who helped develop the UIndy Health Pavilion in which the event took place, spoke on public and private partnerships in community development.

Jennifer Milliken, Director ULI Indiana, left, with Carla Johnson, associate with Faegre Baker Daniels

Jennifer Milliken, Director ULI Indiana, left, with Carla Johnson, associate with Faegre Baker Daniels

In addition to industry professionals, members of the UIndy real estate master’s program took part in the discussion. Mike Patarino of Keystone Realty Group is an instructor in the program and believes the event complemented the material presented in class.

“Kris Farrar (of SCP) discussed the nuances of working with local governments and local communities and how to achieve success not only for the developer but also the surrounding neighborhood. In class, we discuss real-world situations and apply what we have learned. This ULI event was perfect timing and strengthened the concepts that the students are learning,” Patarino said.

Logan Brougher is a current UIndy student and full-time intern with Greenstreet Limited.

“[The event] gave the students the opportunity to strengthen our professional network. It is this network that will serve as the foundation for our professional career, both during our tenure in the program and post graduation.”

The MPS in Real Estate Development program continues to bring industry leaders to campus, with the next taking place Aug. 18. The Curriculum Council, which consists of 15 real estate professionals, will convene to discuss the content presented in the graduate program.

About the MPS in Real Estate Development: As the only program of its kind in the Midwest, the MPS in Real Estate Development is designed for entrepreneurs and working professionals that seek to advance their careers with a master’s education rooted in industry best practices.  Courses are always one evening per week from 6-9:45. Applications for the August 31st cohort start are still being accepted.

 

Alumni breakfast recognizes nearly 300 Greyhounds employed at Eli Lilly

Nearly 300 University of Indianapolis alumni have worked for Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly and Company, a global healthcare leader and Fortune 500 company. The University held a special gathering this month to recognize their impact and the connections they’ve made worldwide. Several UIndy faculty and staff members reconnected with their former students at an alumni breakfast.

A brief program featured UIndy Board of Trustee member and Lilly employee Stephen Fry, UIndy President Rob Manuel and students Tyler Walden and Danielle Sparling, both of whom interned at Lilly. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

A brief program featured UIndy Board of Trustee member and Lilly employee Stephen Fry (pictured), UIndy President Rob Manuel and students Tyler Walden and Danielle Sparling, both of whom interned at Lilly. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

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First WeatherSTEM unit in Indiana installed at UIndy

When it comes to weather, the forecast in Indianapolis can be pretty unpredictable from one day to the next. A new weather station installed at the University of Indianapolis this week will help meteorologists and the community try to make more sense of incoming weather data. weatherstem_2

A solar-powered WeatherSTEM unit providing up-to-the-minute weather data on temperature, wind speed, humidity, rainfall, barometric pressure and many other statistics was installed atop the roof of the Schwitzer Student Center in mid-July. The system also has a sensor in the ground to report soil moisture and ground temperature.

The data from the unit is available now on an interactive website, an app, Facebook and Twitter – allowing the UIndy community and general public to monitor the weather near campus and receive alert notifications. The information is available 24 hours a day and will be used by different groups across campus for safety and research purposes.

The WeatherSTEM station is the result of UIndy faculty and student collaborations to bring new technology to monitor and research weather patterns and atmospheric conditions. Recent Earth-Space Science grad Carly Nicholson ’17 began discussing the idea of a weather station with associate professor Tim Duman nearly three years ago.

As a student, Nicholson branded her campus weather updates with the phrase “Stay Weather Safe.” But it was more than just a tagline. She said, “it’s a lifelong devotion to environmental awareness.”

This spring, she authored a grant to help find financial support for a WeatherSTEM unit. It didn’t take long for UIndy alumnus Bob Green ’70 to take action.

From left: Carly Nicholson '17, Dr. Tim Duman and Luke Hunnewell of WeatherSTEM.

From left: Carly Nicholson ’17, Dr. Tim Duman and Luke Hunnewell of WeatherSTEM.

“UIndy is now a hub of meteorological data. The campus and surrounding community have the opportunity to become more intimate with the weather they experience day to day with use of the WeatherSTEM website, app and social media,” says Nicholson who is currently pursuing her master’s in public affairs and environmental science at IU Bloomington.

Green’s gift to support the WeatherSTEM station is in honor and memory of Dr. William Gommel, a professor of Mathematics & Earth-Space Science at the University from 1965 to 1992.

“I have a hunch that Professor Gommel would be pleased to know that one of his favorite topics – meteorology – has an ongoing presence on the UIndy campus in the form of a live weather data system,” said UIndy alumnus Bob Green ’70.

Members of the community are invited to attend a special dedication ceremony of the WeatherSTEM weather station during Homecoming Weekend on Friday, September 29. Register now.

UIndy sends largest faculty delegation to service learning symposium

Transforming communities through service learning was the focus of this year’s 7th International Symposium on Service Learning, held at the National University of Ireland in Galway. The University of Indianapolis co-hosted the event with NUI Galway and Stellenbosch University (South Africa). screen-shot-2017-07-11-at-1-00-36-pm

UIndy had the largest faculty delegation attending the symposium, and several faculty members presented research on the impact of service learning and community engagement. Marianna Foulkrod, director of Service Learning & Community Engagement, served as co-chair.
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Renovations underway on Good Hall main entrance

The oldest and most iconic building on the University of Indianapolis campus is getting a facelift. 

The front entrance to Good Hall, which has been cordoned off for the past term, is undergoing a restoration process that began in June and will continue through 2018. Renovation plans include refurbishing the building’s two-story portico and six columns at the main entrance. The campus landmark will also receive structural renovations to transform Good Hall into a learning environment that is more aligned with the needs of today’s students.

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UIndy hosts Nitro Circus Live on July 28 at Key Stadium

Nitro Circus Live brings breath-taking stunts and choreographed action to the University of Indianapolis on Friday, July 28. Hot from the 2017 Nitro World Games in Salt Lake City in June, athletes will perform tricks in freestyle motocross, BMX and skate, plus all manner of crazy contraptions off the one-of-a-kind 40-foot Nitro Gigant-A-Ramp.

The two-and-a-half-hour sports-performance show offers a fun family night, with a blend of daredevil action and athletic camaraderie. Nitro Circus will bring in additional seating, staging and ramps to transform Key Stadium for one night only.

Rachelle Merkel-Diaz, director of summer programs at the University, said Nitro Circus is just the beginning as UIndy expands event offerings that appeal to the broader community. Events like Nitro Circus tie in with the University’s strategy to make the Indianapolis south side a destination point that enriches local neighborhoods, with UIndy as an important anchor.

“We’re excited to host Nitro Circus at the University of Indianapolis for the first time. This is a fun, unique event for the whole family, and everyone is invited to come and check it out,” she said.

Merkel-Diaz said residents can expect to see more events happening as the UIndy footprint grows and enhances community partnerships.

Jeremy Rawle, Gregg Godfrey and action sports superstar Travis Pastrana launched the Nitro Circus concept from their garage in Utah in 2003. Since then it’s grown into a worldwide phenomenon, with a series on MTV that aired in more than 60 countries. The show has toured five continents, with sold-out shows in Australia, New Zealand, China, the United States, Canada, South Africa, and all across Europe.

Bob Brubeck, assistant athletic director for facilities & operations, was instrumental in bringing Nitro Circus to the UIndy campus. He became familiar with Nitro Circus through the television program on MTV.

“I thought it would be cool to do it here,” Brubeck said. When Nitro Circus organizers got in touch with him seeking a venue in Indianapolis, he seized the opportunity.

The event could attract as many as 10,000 spectators to campus, making Nitro Circus an ideal way to showcase UIndy’s amenities.

“Many people from the area will be able to see the University and what we have to offer,” Brubeck said.

Fast facts:

When: 7:00 p.m., July 28, 2017
Where: Key Stadium, University of Indianapolis
Cost: From $19 for standing general admission to $124 for a family pack (two adults, two children)

Buy tickets here. Use promo code “HOUNDS” to get 20 percent off.

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