UIndy Educational Leadership program now nationally recognized

The University of Indianapolis School of Education’s iLEAD program recently received national recognition through its specialized professional accrediting body, the ELCC (Educational Leadership Constituent Council).

University of Indianapolis iLEAD program

University of Indianapolis iLEAD program

iLEAD is a School of Education graduate program offering a Master’s of Arts in Educational Leadership, leading to a principal’s license. The goal is to prepare transformative instructional leaders with 21st century skills. 

Read more

University forensics team identifying migrant remains, addressing humanitarian crisis

A University of Indianapolis research team in January continued the painstaking work to identify the remains of dozens of migrants who perished during the rough trek in to the United States.

Beyond Borders TeamSince 2013, Dr. Krista Latham, an associate professor of biology and anthropology, has led a team of University volunteers to Texas with hopes of identifying the remains of people who were buried in unmarked plots. The dead are migrants from Latin America discovered by landowners along the border between Mexico and the United States.   Read more

UIndy hosts national geriatric PT conference

More than 150 health and gerontology professionals from the U.S., the U.K., Canada and Australia are on the UIndy campus today through Saturday for ExPAAC II, a conference on exercise, physical activity and aging presented by the national Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy.

Staples

Staples

The event gives physical therapy practitioners the knowledge and tools they need to help the growing population of older adults achieve maximum function and independence.

UIndy, home to the College of Health Sciences and the Center for Aging & Community, makes a logical host site. Dr. William Staples, associate professor in UIndy’s Krannert School of Physical Therapy, is president of the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy, a division of the American Physical Therapy Association. Dr. Stephanie Kelly, dean of the College of Health Sciences, welcomed the attendees this morning. Dr. Stephanie Combs-Miller, director of research for the Krannert School of Physical Therapy, is among the presenters.

“It is an exciting time for the academy to educate our members about the importance of physical activity for older adults and the direction that our profession is progressing,” Staples said. “Geriatric practice is growing, and we hope to bring inspiring people together to ensure we keep practitioners on the cutting edge.”

Keynote speakers include Kathleen Cameron, senior director of the National Council on Aging’s National Falls Prevention Resource Center, and Howard Friedman, author of The Longevity Project.

Trump-Pence news keeps UIndy experts busy

Albright WTHR

Dr. Laura Albright with WTHR’s John Stehr

Indiana found itself in the national spotlight this week as Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump selected Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate. Fortunately, UIndy faculty were available to provide perspective on an unusual election year that keeps getting more unusual.

“(Often) you have the ‘October surprise’ right before the general election,” Assistant Professor of Political Science Laura Albright told WIBC host and IndyPolitics.org editor Abdul-Hakim Shabazz. “I think in Indiana we’re coining a ‘July surprise,’ the fact that in between the primaries — which were pretty crazy in themselves — and the national conventions, you would think this would be quite a lull, and in fact, everything’s going on in the Hoosier state right now.” Listen to the full 15-minute interview here.

Dr. Albright granted over a dozen interviews this week with such outlets as WTHR, WISH, WTTV and WXIN. Perhaps most notable were an Indiana Public Broadcasting report that aired nationally this morning on NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday, as well as a story earlier in the week by Bloomberg News that also was shared by Yahoo! News.

Frantz WXIN

Dr. Edward Frantz on WXIN/Fox59

Also providing analysis was Professor of History Edward Frantz, who gave a three-minute interview in the WXIN studios and also joined colleague Albright in an hour-long panel discussion Friday on Bloomington public radio station WFIU-FM.

In the news: Sociology, Business, PT

Miller

Miller

Dr. Amanda Miller of the Department of Sociology & Criminal Justice continues to draw national attention with her research on marriage, cohabitation and household dynamics. Most recently, she is coauthor of a study suggesting that couples who share household chores equitably are also busier in the bedroom. Read about it in the New York Post (“Wanna have more sex? Do the dishes”) and Glamour.

*               *               *

Zimmer

Zimmer

Dr. Timothy Zimmer of the School of Business likes to apply his economics acumen to the world of sport. One of his number-crunching finds is that a Major League Baseball team that goes for an extended time without winning a World Series (a la the Chicago Cubs), and has a fan base built around that “lovable loser” image, can actually lose fans in the long run after a winning season. Read about it in The Atlantic.

*               *               *

Combs-Miller

Combs-Miller

The world is still discovering the research performed by Dr. Stephanie Combs-Miller and her Physical Therapy students and colleagues to show the positive impact of Rock Steady Boxing therapy in improving life for clients with Parkinson’s disease.

Their work most recently grabbed the attention of U.S. News and the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. (for the second time this year). Also appearing in recent weeks were stories by Missouri’s Kansas City Star and Springfield News-Leader, each of which was picked up by the Associated Press and shared by news outlets nationwide.

Historian: Surprise ‘Brexit’ vote is perfect storm

UK voters’ discontent echoes unusual election year in the US, he says

WIBC-FM report
IndyPolitics.org interview (audio)

A specialist in modern British history, Dr. Chad Martin knew the so-called “Brexit” referendum would be close, and he understood why.

Martin

Martin

Still, he was surprised late Thursday night when the tally determined the U.K. was leaving the European Union.

“I was going back and forth as I was watching the coverage,” said Martin, associate professor in UIndy’s Department of History & Political Science. “There were some early results coming in that were closer than they should have been.”

The current political dynamic in Britain bears similarities to the U.S. presidential race, he said, with frustrated voters abandoning traditional sympathies for any promise of change. Concerned about immigration and economic uncertainty, stirred by talk of national greatness, Brexit supporters share something with the disaffected Americans who have brought Donald Trump to the brink of the Republican nomination.

“The parallels between the Leave vote and the Trump phenomenon are striking,” Martin said.

Read more

Profs’ project shows issues facing refugees

UIndy researchers spent nine months working with local Congolese women

McMorrow

McMorrow

UPDATE: Read NUVO Newsweekly story

Today has been declared World Refugee Day by the United Nations, and two UIndy professors will share their research on local refugees at a downtown event marking the occasion.

Dr. Shannon McMorrow, interim director of UIndy’s Master of Public Health program, and Dr. Jyotika Saksena, graduate director of the International Relations program, have spent the past nine months working with refugee women who fled political and gender-based violence in their home country, the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Saksena

Saksena

In a research technique known as photovoice, the participants were given cameras and asked to take photos of objects and scenes in their lives that relate to their integration into U.S. society and, more specifically, their access to and experiences with health care and other services since arriving. The researchers interviewed the women to develop captions explaining the significance of the photos.

“The idea behind this project was to hear the perspective of refugees by giving them a voice and empowering them to tell their own stories,” Saksena says.

McMorrow and Saksena will share some of the results today at the Indianapolis observance of World Refugee Day, taking place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the City Market. Organized by Exodus Refugee Inc., the free event will include the photo exhibition, a cooking demonstration, international music and other cultural activities.

Read more

Student archaeology projects draw attention

Famous ‘grave in the road’ had seven occupants, researchers find

grave workAs noted in UIndy News last month, Dr. Christopher Schmidt of the Department of Anthropology has been working with students and colleagues on a job for Johnson County officials: In conjunction with a road improvement project, they were asked to exhume, examine and re-inter the remains of Nancy Kerlin Barnett, presumed occupant of the legendary 1831 “grave in the middle of the road” south of Franklin.

What they found, however, has caused quite a stir. The gravesite contained not one, but seven sets of human remains — three adults and four children — adding more intrigue to a story that has captivated local residents and travelers for decades.

To learn all the details and unanswered questions, check out this week’s coverage in the Indianapolis Star, WISH-TV, WTHRWXINWRTV, Indiana Public MediaUSA TodayArchaeology.org. The CBS Radio News network and scores of news outlets throughout the Midwest carried the story after it was picked up by the Associated Press.

Schmidt will be interviewed Saturday on Hoosier History Live! with host Nelson Price, which airs from noon to 1 p.m. on UIndy’s WICR-88.7 FM/HD. Read a preview here.

Carroll County project featured in WISH-TV’s Bicentennial series

Moore WISH webAs noted in UIndy News last year, Dr. Christopher Moore of the departments of Anthropology and Earth-Space Science has been directing students and educating the public through an extended exploration of a historical site in Carroll County, Ind. The Baum’s Landing site offers a unique window into 19th century life in rural Indiana, and the effort has been declared an official Bicentennial Legacy Project by the 2016 Indiana Bicentennial Commission.

It’s not surprising, then, that WISH-TV would feature Moore and his students in its series of Bicentennial Minute reports. The piece is actually about three minutes long, and you can watch it here.

Moore, himself a UIndy alumnus, also has been involved in the Barnett grave project, by the way.

Orlando: UIndy faculty offer analysis, advice

Journalists have called upon UIndy faculty this week for insights on the tragic mass shooting in Orlando.

AThomasDr. Anita Thomas, dean of the School of Psychological Sciences, was interviewed Monday at RTV6’s Monument Circle studio, discussing the murderer’s possible motivations and how to ease children’s fears about violent events.

“I would certainly encourage parents to have an open dialogue with their children, to ask them how they’re feeling, how they’re responding, to talk to them about any anxiety or stress they might be having in terms of, ‘Could this happen to us?'” Thomas told anchor Jason Fechner. Watch the clip.

KThomasOffering her own take on that advice was Dr. Kendra Thomas, also of Psychological Sciences, who spoke in the WTTV/CBS4 studios with anchors Bob Donaldson and Debby Knox. She cautioned against media overexposure and offered tips for talking with kids of various ages.

“Children often catch a lot more than we give them credit for,” she said. “Something that kids often don’t pick up on is the where and when … . If it’s always being covered in the news, that child might get a sense that it’s always happening.” Watch the clip.

Woodwell

Woodwell

On the incident’s possible connections to terrorist groups, WRTV’s Chris Proffitt spoke with Dr. Douglas Woodwell, Associate Professor of International Relations. That clip was not immediately available.

PT students get taste of life with disabilities

A rite of passage for first-year Doctor of Physical Therapy students at the University of Indianapolis is an event some call “disability lunch.”

The students are outfitted with slings, braces, gloves, blindfolds and other appliances to simulate the effects of stroke, Parkinson’s disease, arthritis and other conditions common to older adults. They then struggle through a buffet lunch and subsequent exercise session in an experience designed to help the future practitioners empathize with their clients’ limitations.

“It’s putting them in their patients’ shoes,” said Associate Professor William Staples, who hosted the latest such event Tuesday at the UIndy Health Pavilion.

More information on the Krannert School of Physical Therapy is available at uindy.edu/pt.

1 2 3 38