Health tech camp lets teens sample careers

As information technology becomes increasingly important in the world of health care, an upcoming three-day camp at the University of Indianapolis offers central Indiana high school students an opportunity to learn about careers in the field.

The Health Information Technology Camp runs from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 27-29. The cost is $150, but scholarships are available.

Developed in consultation with health care and business professionals, the camp will include fun science activities and programs to help students understand and explore college and career possibilities.

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Profs’ project shows issues facing refugees

UIndy researchers spent nine months working with local Congolese women

McMorrow

McMorrow

UPDATE: Read NUVO Newsweekly story

Today has been declared World Refugee Day by the United Nations, and two UIndy professors will share their research on local refugees at a downtown event marking the occasion.

Dr. Shannon McMorrow, interim director of UIndy’s Master of Public Health program, and Dr. Jyotika Saksena, graduate director of the International Relations program, have spent the past nine months working with refugee women who fled political and gender-based violence in their home country, the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Saksena

Saksena

In a research technique known as photovoice, the participants were given cameras and asked to take photos of objects and scenes in their lives that relate to their integration into U.S. society and, more specifically, their access to and experiences with health care and other services since arriving. The researchers interviewed the women to develop captions explaining the significance of the photos.

“The idea behind this project was to hear the perspective of refugees by giving them a voice and empowering them to tell their own stories,” Saksena says.

McMorrow and Saksena will share some of the results today at the Indianapolis observance of World Refugee Day, taking place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the City Market. Organized by Exodus Refugee Inc., the free event will include the photo exhibition, a cooking demonstration, international music and other cultural activities.

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Student archaeology projects draw attention

Famous ‘grave in the road’ had seven occupants, researchers find

grave workAs noted in UIndy News last month, Dr. Christopher Schmidt of the Department of Anthropology has been working with students and colleagues on a job for Johnson County officials: In conjunction with a road improvement project, they were asked to exhume, examine and re-inter the remains of Nancy Kerlin Barnett, presumed occupant of the legendary 1831 “grave in the middle of the road” south of Franklin.

What they found, however, has caused quite a stir. The gravesite contained not one, but seven sets of human remains — three adults and four children — adding more intrigue to a story that has captivated local residents and travelers for decades.

To learn all the details and unanswered questions, check out this week’s coverage in the Indianapolis Star, WISH-TV, WTHRWXINWRTV, Indiana Public MediaUSA TodayArchaeology.org. The CBS Radio News network and scores of news outlets throughout the Midwest carried the story after it was picked up by the Associated Press.

Schmidt will be interviewed Saturday on Hoosier History Live! with host Nelson Price, which airs from noon to 1 p.m. on UIndy’s WICR-88.7 FM/HD. Read a preview here.

Carroll County project featured in WISH-TV’s Bicentennial series

Moore WISH webAs noted in UIndy News last year, Dr. Christopher Moore of the departments of Anthropology and Earth-Space Science has been directing students and educating the public through an extended exploration of a historical site in Carroll County, Ind. The Baum’s Landing site offers a unique window into 19th century life in rural Indiana, and the effort has been declared an official Bicentennial Legacy Project by the 2016 Indiana Bicentennial Commission.

It’s not surprising, then, that WISH-TV would feature Moore and his students in its series of Bicentennial Minute reports. The piece is actually about three minutes long, and you can watch it here.

Moore, himself a UIndy alumnus, also has been involved in the Barnett grave project, by the way.

UIndy, American Pianists announce partnership

Winner of 2017 American Pianists Awards will serve as artist-in-residence

DeHaan Center will host 2017 American Pianists Awards new music recital

APA logoThe American Pianists Association and the University of Indianapolis announced today a partnership to launch an artist-in-residence program and create opportunities for college students and the broader community to experience world-class musical talent.

Under the agreement, the winner of the 2017 American Pianists Awards in classical music – one of the world’s most prestigious music competitions – will serve as artist-in-residence at UIndy during the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 academic years. Residencies each semester will include guest lectures, master classes, public performances, private lessons for students and other activities. The artist also will rehearse and perform a concert with the UIndy Chamber Orchestra.

Harrison

Harrison

“Our collaboration with the University of Indianapolis is one of the most exciting developments to have come forth at American Pianists Association in recent years,” said APA President/CEO and Artistic Director Joel Harrison. “I have worked with UIndy in numerous ways since my earliest years at APA, and I am especially delighted to have this entrepreneurial program come to life in such a creative way, thanks to the support and vision of the UIndy administration and faculty at all levels.” He noted that the partnership complements APA’s ongoing Concerto Curriculum program, through which its competition winners and finalists work with high school students.

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Olympian Joyner-Kersee meets track camp kids

Joyner-Kersee USATFTrack and field legend Jackie Joyner-Kersee speaks to young athletes earlier today at Key Stadium during USA Track & Field’s first youth camp.

Not every day does one receive life coaching from Sports Illustrated’s “Greatest Female Athlete of the 20th Century,” but that’s what happened for a group of budding athletes today at UIndy.

The legendary Jackie Joyner-Kersee, joined by fellow four-time Olympian Aretha Thurmond, spoke with scores of local kids ages 9-18 at the inaugural USA Track & Field Development Camp, one of many summer camps and conferences hosted by the University of Indianapolis.

The winner of three gold medals noted that she was pleased to be back in the Circle City, where she set a world record in the long jump in 1987.

“But it’s really not about that,” Joyner-Kersee told the young people gathered at UIndy’s Key Stadium. “It’s really about each and every one of you being here today and tomorrow, learning as much as you can. While learning, make it fun, enjoy what you do, but also listen to what they’re asking you to do. … Work hard in everything that you are trying to accomplish. If it’s in the classroom, work hard. You got homework? You have to prepare. It’s the same way on the athletic field.”

VIDEO: Commencement among May highlights

May 2016 at UIndy meant high-profile student research, national NCAA action and a little thing called Commencement, featuring NPR’s Steve Inskeep and singer-actress Jearlyn Steele. Click the image to watch.

Education MBA program names new fellows

Launched at UIndy, Woodrow Wilson initiative expands to other universities

The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation today announced the new 2016-2017 class of Woodrow Wilson Indiana MBA Fellows in Education Leadership, more than 60 educators nominated by their schools and corporations for innovative preparation to lead 21st-century schools.

WW logoThe MBA Fellowship blends clinical experience in schools with rigorous business coursework to ensure that graduates have the knowledge and skills to guide schools and districts through a changing education environment. The program is designed to close achievement gaps between America’s lowest- and highest-performing schools and between top-performing U.S. schools and those around the world.

The Indiana program debuted in 2014 with the first cohort at the University of Indianapolis. This year, the third cohort at UIndy is joined by inaugural groups at Indiana State University and Indiana University, thanks to support from Lilly Endowment Inc. Similar programs operate in Wisconsin and New Mexico, preparing new school leaders to drive innovation, expand the use of analytics and evidence-based practices, raise student performance to international levels and improve the quality of school systems and teaching over time.

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PT students to host free health fair today

Health Fair Flyer 2016Students from UIndy’s Krannert School of Physical Therapy will bring health screenings and wellness information to an underserved community today during the 10th annual Laurelwood Health Fair.

As a project for a Health Promotion and Wellness course, 44 second-year students from the Doctor of Physical Therapy program will carry out the event from 4 to 6 p.m. today at Laurelwood Apartments, a subsidized housing complex for low-income families located just off Carson Avenue.

The event at the Laurelwood Community Center, overseen by Associate Professor Anne Mejia-Downs, will include blood pressure screenings, wellness-related activities for all ages and even games and prizes.Health Fair Flyer 2016 2

Greyhound alumni keep Indy 500 on track

Watch UIndy alumnus Adam Henze, official poet of the 100th Running of the Indianapolis 500, recite his winning entry, “For Those Who Love Fast, Loud Things,” courtesy of WFIU and NPR.

Without the University of Indianapolis and the tremendous life preparation it provides, could there even be a “100th Running of the Indianapolis 500 presented by PennGrade Motor Oil”?

Well, probably, but it sure wouldn’t be the same. While we can’t name them all, here are just a few of the Greyhound alumni who are making this year’s Greatest Spectacle in Racing as great as it is. We might as well call this thing the UIndy 500.

Reinbold

Reinbold

Let’s start with university trustee and alumnus Dennis Reinbold, who earned a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from UIndy on his way to becoming president and CEO of high-end auto dealership Dreyer & Reinbold. He’s also the owner of Dreyer & Reinbold Racing, which this year is running 21-year-old driver Sage Karam in the No. 24 Gas Monkey Energy Chevrolet. NBC Sports has a nice story about the Dreyer/Reinbold family’s long history at the Speedway, which dates to the 1920s. Read it here.

B Barnhart

Barnhart

Brian Barnhart, who earned a bachelor’s degree in Political Science at UIndy, has been involved with IMS and IndyCar since the early ‘90s, and he previously worked as a mechanic for such legends as A.J. Foyt and Al Unser Jr. He currently serves in the crucial role of vice president of competition for IndyCar and race director for the Verizon IndyCar Series, overseeing the race-control staff, timing, scoring, rules compliance and the safety and medical teams.

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OT professor’s research: theater vs. addiction

Altered logo

Collaborating on play helps participants see beyond substance abuse

News coverage:
Indianapolis Star
WFYI-FM

Involvement in theater programs can help substance abusers break the patterns of thought that feed their addictions, a UIndy professor’s research indicates.

Wasmuth

Wasmuth

The evidence will be on stage June 3 and 4 when Dr. Sally Wasmuth and the School of Occupational Therapy present Altered, a play in which the key actors are six men and women recovering from substance abuse disorders. Each performance begins at 7 p.m. in Studio Theatre on the lower level of UIndy’s Esch Hall. Admission is free, and tickets can be reserved at this link.

The one-hour production is the culmination of a six-week occupational therapy intervention program conducted in partnership with Fairbanks Alcohol & Drug Treatment Recovery Center.

“When someone is using drugs on a regular basis, that becomes an occupation for them,” Wasmuth said. “The idea behind this research is that they need other occupations to structure their time.”

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