UIndy Engineering and Sociology Research Team Recognized as Best Paper Finalist at 2021 Engineering Education Conference

Dr. Megan Hammond, assistant professor in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering; Dr. Joan Martinez, assistant professor in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering; and Dr. Elizabeth Ziff, assistant professor of sociology, were recognized this July at the 128th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). 

The work of Hammond, Martinez, and Ziff was selected as a best paper finalist in the 2021 Design in Engineering Education Division (DEED) at the July meeting of ASEE. DEED accepted and published over 70 papers this year, and as a best paper finalist, the paper submitted by Hammond, Martinez, and Ziff was recognized as one of the top five works by the DEED committee. The submitted paper, “An exploration of Social and Educational Influences on User-centered Design: Revisiting a Compatibility Questionnaire” focuses on how to introduce the concept of social, cultural, and educational design biases to first-year engineering students learning about user-centered design and the definition of a “good” design. 

“This aligns specifically with the Engineering Accreditation Commission’s desire for students to engineer global and societal solutions,” said Hammond. “Our work is supporting the conversation to allow unique insights of first-year engineering students to naturally identify the complexity and impact of the design process.”

Hammond, Martinez, and Ziff were extremely honored by the recognition of their work at the DEED session, and would like to recognize the outstanding contributions of their student researcher, Dominique Lewis ‘23 (sociology). The team is moving forward with their work and building upon their publication and recognition by DEED to continue to bring diversity, equity, and inclusivity into the engineering curriculum at the University of Indianapolis. 

“The announcement was a true validation that the work we are doing at UIndy is relevant and welcomed by our colleagues driving the improvement of engineering design education,” said Hammond. “The team is excited to see how our work will continue to impact our students and how they approach design problems.”

R.B. Annis School of Engineering receives NSF grant funding

The University of Indianapolis’ R.B. Annis School of Engineering recently received a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to connect high school students and teachers to the field of engineering. The funds are part of a larger $4 million grant distribution made to UIndy and partnering institutions including Arizona State University, Morgan State University, and the University of Maryland. 

During the next three years, the R.B. Annis School, the University of Indianapolis School of Education, and their partners will use the funds to broaden the impact of Engineering for US All (e4usa), an NSF-funded program that makes engineering more accessible to high school students and educators. e4usa provides an educational curriculum for students to learn and demonstrate engineering principles, skills and practices while training educators interested in teaching. The Annis School will receive approximately $300,000 to support this work and expand e4usa’s innovative curriculum to Indiana K-12 schools. 

“The e4usa program has already made a tremendous impact by creating opportunities for students and teachers to engage with engineering in new and exciting ways,” said Ken Reid, Associate Dean of the Annis School. “The R.B. Annis School of Engineering is thrilled to expand our community connections as we help to introduce students and eliminate barriers to instruction through an accessible curriculum and introduce more students and teachers to the fast-growing field of engineering.”

As an innovative high school engineering program, e4usa has already worked with 36 high schools and more than 2,000 students in 12 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The new NSF funding will help quickly extend e4usa’s reach to include approximately 5,000 students and 50 teachers nationwide, with plans to expand over the next few years. Students are recruited from public, independent and parochial schools in rural, suburban and urban settings. e4usa students explore engineering in society, develop professional skills, and engage in community-focused engineering design experiences, all aimed at helping them see themselves as engineers. 

Locally, UIndy is working with two new e4usa partner schools: Christel House Schools and Positive Supports Academy in Indianapolis. UIndy serves as a university partner for both schools, helping each to offer the e4usa curriculum for the first time.  

“(Through e4usa), I am able to share methods of learning with my students not usually available,” said Paula Huston, Tech Education, Engineering, and Robotics Teacher at Positive Supports Academy. “My school is the alternative school and my students are more likely to not graduate due to behaviors that put them at my school. That being said, e4USA’s programming allows me to show them possibilities and help them think like engineers when it comes to solving problems whether or not they are academically related. The whole process is helpful to students even if they don’t eventually become engineers. I am hoping that our connection will allow more of my students to see possibilities they might not have been exposed to had they not been a part of this program. I think the hands-on nature of this coursework added to the problem-solving methods are two more tools my students will have to obtain success.”

2021 UIndy Engineering 3D Printing Summer Camp: Developing the Next Generation of Makers

The R. B. Annis School of Engineering and the Center for Collaborative Innovation (CCI) successfully completed the 2021 STEM summer camp with the theme; Make the Maker: UIndy Engineering 3D Printing Summer Camp

The summer camp had nine high school student campers. The camp, which combined engineering and entrepreneurial mindset development, focused on the design, fabrication, and use of 3D printers. The pre-college participants were exposed to advanced design tools as well as digital manufacturing processes at the new Annis Hall facility. Though the camps was only scheduled to run two weeks, R.B. Annis School of Engineering faculty and staff Dr. Paul Talaga, James Emery, Dr. Megan Hammond, Dr. Joan Martinez, and Dr. David Olawale worked with the students for over three weeks because of the participants’ engagement and the organizers’ commitment for campers to go home with their operational 3D printers after the camp.

According to Dr. Paul Talaga (Camp Coordinator) the camp modeled the engineering process well.  “In the real world, the answers aren’t in the back of the book. Rather than run a camp where participants used 3D printers to print trinkets, we challenged the campers to imagine, design, and build a functional 3D printer on their own. Their creativity was astounding!  Each printer was unique and contained dozens of 3D printed and waterjeted parts, each having been designed by campers who went through many iterations to verify proper fit and functionality.  The creativity, problem solving, CAD, 3D printing, and fabrication skills acquired will allow these campers to continue their creativity.”

Some of the feedback from the campers on key lessons learned included:

“Learned how to manage my time, utilize CAD software, and learned to persevere through challenges.”
“Better CAD skills and thinking of how to assemble a product”
“I learned a lot about CAD and problem solving.”

Due to support from the Elevate Nexus Higher Education Grant, two high schoolers from Southport High School in Indianapolis, who would not have otherwise been able, were able to participate in the camp on full scholarships. “It is important to expose our high schoolers to advanced design and manufacturing tools as well as the entrepreneurial mindset,” said David Olawale, assistant professor of engineering, “So that we may attract them to the STEM disciplines and increase their ability to solve problems that matter to our nation, irrespective of economical and social status.” The CCI works on promoting innovation and entrepreneurship across UIndy and the surrounding communities.

UIndy Students Take Home First Prize at National Robotics Competition

A team of students from the R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis won first place in the combat robot competition at the National Robotics Challenge World Championship. 

Over the past academic year, a team of seniors designed, fabricated, and tested the combat robot. These students include:

  • Jonathan Key, Mechanical Engineering
  • Tyler Cole, Industrial & Systems Engineering 
  • Laura Johnson, Mechanical Engineering 
  • Ryan Kallenberger, Mechanical Engineering

In April, the team’s robot design passed a stringent qualification round and were invited to participate in the finals that took place in Marion, OH, in May, where the R.B Annis School of Engineering team won first place (gold award) in the post-secondary division of the combat robot competition, and boasted an undefeated record throughout the tournament.  

Ryan Kallenberger was the game-day captain and driver of the robot at the event, and junior Mechanical Engineering major, Anthony WIlliamson, represented the team at the competition as well. 

The Staff and Faculty who traveled with the students to Marion, OH to support the team include:

  • James Emery who also significantly supported the student team in designing, testing, and fabricating the robot, and was also a competition advisor. 
  • Najmus Saqib Mechanical Engineering faculty support and competition advisor.
  • Cameron Wright a local engineering and external advisor.
  • Joseph B. Herzog, team advisor and senior design instructor and course coordinator. 

Eliot Motato, also supported and advised the team along with Herzog as a Faculty Team Committee member throughout the academic year. Plus, many other R.B. Annis School of Engineering faculty and staff helped support the team throughout the year to help make this happen. 

The Sease Institute, powered by the University of Indianapolis, launches Engineering Management certification

A new Engineering Management certification program offered by the Sease Institute, powered by the University of Indianapolis, will provide early-career engineers with a competitive edge in the marketplace.

Created by faculty in the University of Indianapolis School of Business and R.B. Annis School of Engineering, the online Engineering Management certification is available to any engineering student or engineer seeking to become a technical team lead, supervisor or manager.

Through a partnership with the American Society for Engineering Management, the program combines the technical aspects of engineering with the organizational and planning aspects of management. Participants will earn additional certifications in SAP, Lean Six Sigma Yellow and Green Belts, Occupational Health and Safety as well as ISO Auditing.

At a fraction of the time and cost required to complete a master’s degree, the certification requires four courses, which may be taken synchronously or asynchronously. Each course meets online for three hours per week over seven weeks. Systems Management is available from May 17 through July 1, 2021. Process Management is offered from July 5 through August 20, 2021. Facilities Management and Financial Management will be offered in the summer of 2022. Registration is available online at SeaseInstitute.com.

Craig Seidelson, assistant professor of operations and supply chain management, co-developed the program alongside engineering professors Christopher Stanley, David Olawale and Mohammad Shokrolah Shirazi.

“As a person who made the transition to project manager, team leader, engineering manager and then chief engineer, I understand how difficult it can be,” Seidelson said. “This program is designed to give today’s engineers as well as those presently pursuing engineering degrees, the skills and experience necessary to take on leadership roles in engineering.”

Learn more and apply today: seaseinstitute.com/emc

About the Sease Institute
The Sease Institute, powered by the University of Indianapolis, redefines the role of higher education in workforce development by generating custom corporate training solutions. With a solid track record of partnerships with Central Indiana industry and thought leaders, the Sease Institute focuses on being relevant, agile and responsive in order to design training programs that disrupt the status quo while creating positive and innovative outcomes for partners and the industry. Learn more: seaseinstitute.com.

About the University of Indianapolis
The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. The University was one of the first institutions in Indiana to develop the operations and supply chain major. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.”

Learn more about the UIndy School of Business and the R.B. Annis School of Engineering.

 

Annis School Hosts 3rd Annual Business Pitch Competition

corner_extensionThe R.B. Annis School of Engineering held its third annual Engineering Business Pitch Competition on April 20, 2021. The event had 65 participants comprising students, mentors, judges, faculty and guests. Four teams of engineering students presented their products and business models at the event. 

For the last nine months, students have worked with School of Engineering faculty and staff as well as industry mentors to develop competitive products and business models. The industry mentors included: Terry Moore (Huntington Bank); Richard Calvert and Payton Staman (Citizens Energy Group); Carl Boss (GTC Machining) and Zachary Holtgrewe (Allegion).

“Helping to instill an entrepreneurial spirit in students like the Business Pitch Competition does is not only beneficial to the industry, but I think it fosters a way for those students who are truly passionate about engineering to push themselves to their limits,” said Zachary Holtgrewe. “The School of Engineering has a great program and it’s been an honor working with my team.”

Students also worked with professor Rhonda Wolverton and her students from the Department of Art and Design. In addition, professor Marcos Hashimoto from the School of Business presented a seminar on business financial planning while Charles P. Schmal, a patent attorney from Woodard, Emhardt, Henry, Reeves & Wagner, LLP, presented a seminar on intellectual property protection to the engineering students. 

“The collaboration and innovation between many different people and departments really make this competition unique,” said Ken Reid, associate dean and director of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering. “Our students take these projects from business case to execution, taking a hands-on approach—a hallmark of our curriculum in the School of Engineering—every step of the way.”

According to Dr. David Olawale, assistant professor of engineering, the engineering students’ exposure to expertise and training from other disciplines is critical for innovation and for creating outstanding solutions that meet the needs of the customers in today’s globally competitive marketplace. “Collaboration is critical for successful innovation,” he said. “Our students are equipped with not just technical skills, but also the entrepreneurial mindset to focus on the customers’ needs and how to create value competitively.”

Richard Calvert, one of the industry mentors from Citizens Energy Group, says he is always impressed with how polished and professional the UIndy students are in their presentations. “I really do enjoy seeing the development of the products from the idea stage, to surveys for better understanding the needs of their potential customers, and lastly to the building and testing of a prototype for their product,” he added.

The competition ended with Team 9 (Spacious) coming in first place. The team designed an extendable desk that wowed the judges. Students on the team included Meredith Magee (project manager), Damla Silahyurekli (assistant project manager), Alex Ruble, Anthony Williamson, Nate Comely and Mark Sciutto.

“I was able to apply the knowledge I’ve learned in the classroom to solve a real world problem,” said Sciutto. “Working in the new engineering building gave us the resources and space necessary to complete it.”

“We also had some issues along the way, and using what I learned in other classes was crucial to solving them. So winning the business pitch competition was very gratifying,” Sciutto added.

 

The runner-up position went to Team 7 First Responder: Dalton Lowry (project manager) and Dylan Beach (assistant project manager). The team designed a storage system for first responders. 

Third place went to Team 6 who designed a touchless high flow rate liquid dispenser to curb the spreading of germs. The fourth position went to Team 8 who developed a system for tracking drivers’ behavior with the goal of saving fuel cost and reducing crashes.

The Elevate Nexus Higher Education grant provided funding support for the program as well as the R.B. Annis School of Engineering Center for Collaborative Innovation (CCI).

Spotlight: Seth Ward ’23

SethWardSeth Ward ’23 is a software engineering major at the R.B. Annis School of Engineering. A New Zealand citizen, he also is a Strain Honors College student with minors in mathematics and computer science.

 

What has your experience in the engineering program been like so far?

“So far I think I’ve set a good basis of knowledge from my courses. Having a lot of contact with my professors has helped me learn more than I think I would have in huge classes based upon how I learn. The DesignSpine is great for incorporating knowledge from multiple different disciplines and bringing it together on one project. This is great because it gives you a lot of experience on what jobs will be like after college.”

Could you talk about your experience as an international student and how the pandemic affected you?

“During the Fall semester of 2020 I stayed at home in New Zealand due to the nature of the pandemic in the United States. All of my professors were very understanding and many went out of their way to help me throughout the semester. Most of the time they would record their Zoom lectures to the rest of the class and upload the footage to the Google Drive where I would be able to view them at a time which better suited me; this is because due to the 16-hour time difference the live classes were between midnight and 7 a.m. for me, which wouldn’t have been possible to complete my studies. I also worked with my professors to organize times to take tests which were different than the class times so that it would work for me.”

Have any faculty members mentored you?

“I work a lot with Dr. [Steve] Spicklemire over a wide range of my courses. He’s my point faculty on our Engineering Design spine project. Also has taken me for SWEN and Physics classes, I have regular contact with him and he helps and advises on anything I need.”

Seth Ward

Seth Ward (UIndy Athletics file photo)

Are you involved in any extracurricular activities?

“I’m part of the men’s soccer team here for the university. It’s the reason I’m here at the university; as an international student I was scouted to come play for the school. I think getting to play at the collegiate level is a great experience. Mainly just getting to be around the boys on the team is great.”

What advice would you give to incoming freshmen at UIndy?

“Don’t specialise too early; explore what’s on offer to find what you enjoy.”

What’s your favorite thing about UIndy?

“The small class sizes. You’re able to specialize and get a lot more one on one time with your professors. You also are able to create better working relationships with them which in turn helps out throughout your courses.”

University of Indianapolis R.B. Annis School of Engineering expands to innovative new space on Shelby St.

INDIANAPOLIS—The University of Indianapolis held a dedication ceremony Wednesday, March 24, 2021, to commemorate the state-of-the-art R.B. Annis Hall as the new home of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering. Located at 3750 South Shelby Street, R.B. Annis Hall will accommodate the University’s rapidly growing engineering program and allow the school’s DesignSpine component to expand beyond its original footprint and meet growing demand.

The R.B. Annis School of Engineering was established in 2017 through a transformative $5 million grant from the R.B. Annis Educational Foundation. Since its founding, the Annis School has set a regional standard as an innovative engineering school offering seven specialized areas of study in computer engineering, electrical engineering, software engineering, mechanical engineering, industrial & systems engineering, computer science, and general engineering. The R.B. Annis Hall expansion is the culmination of the University’s $25 million investment in its engineering programs.

“With the expansion of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering, the University of Indianapolis is further strengthening its impact on economic growth across the state, both as a net importer of talent to Indiana and as an institution that is creating engineers who can produce solutions to the most critical engineering questions of our time,” said University of Indianapolis President Robert L. Manuel.

With 19 full-time faculty and directors and an average class size of ten students, the Annis School offers students real-world industry experience through internships and collaborative projects with internal and external clients, as well as mentoring and soft skills development. The inaugural Class of 2020 had a job placement rate of 92% and an average starting salary of $65,000. The University has provided $1.6 million in engineering scholarships in the 2020-21 academic year alone.

Ken Reid, associate dean and director of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering, said in addition to providing the necessary space for programs, R.B. Annis Hall will support the school as it builds industry relationships in the community.

“We will be more visible to our engineering partners, which will lead to more projects and partnerships for our DesignSpine program. This means more real-world, hands-on experience for our students,” Reid said.

The larger space translates to more opportunities for creative and innovative designs from the Annis School’s student teams. Reid said students will have a greater opportunity to establish exceptional working relationships in larger maker spaces, shops and labs. Faculty will have the opportunity to more effectively work with and mentor teams, as well as to collaborate with each other and partners beyond campus.

Reid expects R.B. Annis Hall will pave the way for more innovative interdisciplinary projects which have been a hallmark of the Annis School. The recently launched Center for Collaborative Innovation, funded through an Elevate Nexus Higher Education Grant, will further promote the collaborative innovation framework. 

President Robert L. Manuel

President Robert L. Manuel

“In addition to providing our students with innovative, cutting-edge experiences, these developments ensure that UIndy continues to meet current and long-term accreditation requirements. They also play a vital role in helping us to accommodate the increasing enrollments in our programs,” said President Robert L. Manuel.

About the University of Indianapolis

The University of Indianapolis, founded in 1902, is a private university located just a few minutes from downtown Indianapolis. The University is ranked among the top National Universities by U.S. News and World Report, with a diverse enrollment of nearly 5,600 undergraduate, graduate and continuing education students. The University offers a wide variety of study areas, including 100+ undergraduate degrees, more than 40 master’s degree programs and five doctoral programs. More occupational therapists, physical therapists and clinical psychologists graduate from the University each year than any other state institution. With strong programs in engineering, business, and education, the University of Indianapolis impacts its community by living its motto, “Education for Service.” Learn more: uindy.edu.

R.B. Annis School of Engineering expands impact with global project

Students at the R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis had the chance to apply their skills to solve a real-world problem with a far-reaching impact. The Annis School partnered with the Indianapolis-based Institute for Affordable Transport (IAT), which connects communities in developing countries with basic transportation and vehicles that feature robust and simple designs.

The idea got off the ground when David Olawale, assistant professor of engineering, contacted IAT to explore an industry-based project for the Manufacturing Processes course taken by senior mechanical engineering (ME) students. The goal was to give students the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills from the course on a real-life project. In addition, the project had a service component in which the UIndy engineering students were able to apply their knowledge to help in making a product more affordable and accessible to many in developing nations. 

“The challenges [the students] faced in working with their team, clients and different stakeholders are critical experiences they get to share during job and internship interviews, thereby setting them apart from other graduates,” Olawale said.

The project was a perfect fit with the Annis School’s mission to use interdisciplinary education to develop modern engineering leaders who create outstanding solutions, he added. The Annis School focuses on providing unique experiential learning opportunities for students through real world open-ended, industry-based projects.

“The complexity of such problems and the exposure of students to such problems help them in developing effective problem-solving, teamwork, and communication capacity that are not readily possible with textbook-based problem-solving. Such exposure helps students to understand the needs of the industry and how to solve problems for the industry,” Olawale explained.

Working alongside David Olawale and Mechanical Systems Laboratory Manager James Emery, three mechanical engineering students—TJ LeSeure ’20, Payton Staman ’20, and Jake Braumbaugh ’20—were tasked with designing a power platform fixture for the IAT’s Basic Utility Vehicle (BUV). The BUVs are used in some developing nations as a multifunctional vehicle for transporting people, animals, water, food and construction materials. It can be a game changer for many communities in developing nations in terms of economic growth, access to clean water, food security and medical supply transportation.

In order to simplify the assembly process of the vehicles, IAT asked that UIndy’s team design a fixture for the assembly of the motor deck. The motor deck holds two components, the motor and the transmission. The student team was asked to design the fixture for the motor deck by incorporating their knowledge of jig and fixtures, design for manufacturing and additive manufacturing. Working with lab manager James Emery, the students learned how to work with production experts to successfully translate a design into a manufacturable product.

LeSeure said, “My favorite part of the project was being able to apply the things I learned in the classroom to a project that would help improve people’s lives. It was truly a rewarding experience that helped me tap into the passionate side of engineering.”

Students learned to work in a team environment as they communicated effectively with the client through site visits, video conferencing and emails to gain a good understanding of the client’s requirements and needs. New knowledge from the manufacturing processes course was applied in the design of the fixture for the automotive component. Students also developed their resilience and resourcefulness in creating a viable solution for an industry-client even in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic and its challenges.

Industry client Will Austin was impressed with the results. “We have completed over 50 engineering projects with 20 different universities during the last 20 years. Sometimes we learn a more simple or more cost-effective solution. Sometimes we merely learn what not to do. In the case of UIndy, we are using their fixtures in BUV production, and we are very pleased with the performance of the fixtures,” Austin said.

Austin placed an order for four more fixtures to be fabricated by the Annis School’s technical staff to be delivered to the client’s customers in Africa, the first of which are in northern Benin, West Africa.

“I really enjoyed working with the UIndy students. They were very prepared for the calls and kept me updated on developments. The engineers made good progress on the project despite COVID setbacks,” Austin added. “The end result was an excellent fixture that will be used with our next factory partners.”

The R.B. Annis School of Engineering will continue to work with IAT through the DesignSpine curriculum.

R.B. Annis School of Engineering moving to expanded space on Shelby St.

Starting this month, the R.B. Annis School of Engineering will begin moving into the newly renovated R.B. Annis Hall located at 3750 Shelby St. Since its founding, the school has rapidly grown into an innovative engineering school offering seven specialized areas of study in computer engineering, electrical engineering, software engineering, mechanical engineering, industrial & systems engineering, computer science, and general engineering. 

The larger facility on Shelby St. will accommodate these programs and address their space-related needs. The new space also allows the school’s DesignSpine component to expand beyond its original footprint and meet growing demand.

Ken Reid, associate dean and director of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering, said in addition to providing the necessary space for programs, R.B. Annis Hall will support the school as it builds an identity on campus and in the community.

“We will be more visible to our engineering partners, which should lead to more projects and partnerships for our DesignSpine program. This means more real-world, hands-on experience for our students,” Reid said.

  • The newly renovated R.B. Annis Hall at 3750 S. Shelby St. will be the new home of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering starting in the Spring 2021 semester.
    The newly renovated R.B. Annis Hall at 3750 S. Shelby St. will be the new home of the R.B. Annis School of Engineering starting in the Spring 2021 semester.

The larger space translates to more opportunities for creative and innovative designs from the Annis School’s student teams. Reid said students will have a greater opportunity to establish exceptional working relationships in larger maker spaces, shops and labs. Faculty will have the opportunity to more effectively work with and mentor teams, as well as to collaborate with each other and other partners beyond campus.

“One aspect which I look most forward to is the creation of new space,” Reid added. “When student design teams meet with their industry customers, we’ll have a professional space in which to meet. The space itself will build a sense of community within students, and expand student opportunity.” 

Reid hopes R.B. Annis Hall will pave the way for more innovative interdisciplinary projects which have been a hallmark of the Annis School. The recently launched Center for Collaborative Innovation, funded through an Elevate Nexus Higher Education Grant, will further promote the collaborative innovation framework. 

“In addition to providing our students with innovative, cutting-edge experiences, these developments ensure that UIndy continues to meet current and long-term accreditation requirements. They also play a critical role in helping us to accommodate the increasing enrollments in our programs,” said President Robert L. Manuel.

The newly available space in Martin Hall created by the R.B. Annis School of Engineering move will be used to meet a variety of needs across campus including additional space for the Department of Music. As part of these improvements, physical plant operations have moved to 3802 Shelby St. and their vacated building will be renovated to allow for the expansion of the Department of Art & Design.

Plans are underway for a safe celebration of the Annis School’s expansion. Details will be shared once those plans are finalized.

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