UIndy engineering students earn top awards at ASEE conference

Screenshot 2019-04-04 22.04.35Twenty engineering students and ten engineering faculty attended the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Illinois-Indiana Section Conference for 2019 hosted by the University of Evansville in March.

From a field that included students from universities from around the region including Purdue University, students from the R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis took home both first- and second-place poster presentation awards. (See a complete list of the winning teams below.)

“It was a great experience to be able to share our project with other engineering professionals and experts,” said Marko Tasic ’21 (industrial and systems engineering).

Students participating in the conference are from the sophomore level ENGR 298 – Engineering Design Lab IV and junior level ENGR 398 – Engineering Design Lab IV, both core classes of the DesignSpine curriculum that emphasizes project-oriented courses with practical, hands-on experience and collaboration on real-world projects.

Joseph B. Herzog is the lead instructor and course coordinator for ENGR 298 and David Olawale is the lead instructor and course coordinator for ENGR 398. Teaching both of these courses is a team effort from all of faculty in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering. Student teams meet with engineering faculty members each week to discuss project status and also consult with faculty outside of class time for technical assistance.

Screenshot 2019-04-04 22.06.19“What I love about this class is that when I walk into the machine shop during the class period, I see a diverse group of students working on multiple different projects. Some students are welding, others are cutting steel, and others are working on the mill. This is a great experience that connects students with external customers, enables students to use their technical engineering skills to design the project, but also give students the opportunities for hands-on work, that will make them better engineers,” Herzog said.

Olawale said the focus during the junior year of the DesignSpine sequence is “entrepreneurial mindset development in our engineering students. Our students are not only developing critical technical skills like engineering design, they are also developing the capacity to identify and exploit needs as opportunities to create value for different stakeholders. Such is the case for our student team that took first position. They are developing a software product that will help universities in assessing the value of the education they are providing.”

List of 2019 ASEE IL-IN Section Award Winners:

Outstanding Poster Awards

1st Place:

“Return on Investment On A University Education: Development of An Analytical Software Tool”

Student Team Members:

  • Joshua Love ’20 (software engineering) 
  • Kristians Kanders ’20 (software engineering) 
  • Kinsey West ’20 (industrial & systems engineering)
  • Ante Lucev ’20 (software engineering) 

2nd Place:

“Design and Fabrication of a Custom Wrist Orthosis for Enhanced Patient Comfort”

Student Team Members:

  • Marko Tasic ’21 (industrial & systems engineering)
  • Matthew Hansen ’21 (mechanical engineering and engineering)
  • Mang Lian ’21 (mechanical engineering)
  • Demetre Mitchell ’21 (mechanical engineering)

South Indy benefits from fruits of UIndy faculty and student labors

The South Indy Quality of Life Plan (SoIndy) is a volunteer organization made up of community residents in eight neighborhoods, including University Heights surrounding the University of Indianapolis, working to bring better quality living to the area. Amie Wojtyna, assistant professor in public health and a University Heights resident, chairs the SoIndy Health and Wellness Action Team, which focuses largely on food insecurity.

“I got involved because I live in this community,” Wojtyna said. “Food insecurity is one of my areas of interest. Most of the SoIndy community is in a food desert.”

Wojtyna’s action team has been integral in bringing to life the community gardens at Bethany Lutheran Church. In addition to providing plots for neighbors to grow their own produce, much of the harvest from the gardens is donated to two local food pantries.

Sean Yeh ’18 (public health education and promotion), worked with SoIndy to help identify what kind of produce patrons of the food pantries were most interested in receiving. Yeh, who was a student of Wojtyna’s, collected input from 139 patrons of Servant’s Heart and Hunger, Inc. food pantries, as well as from Bethany Lutheran’s Learning Ministry. The top three vote-getters in Yeh’s survey were tomatoes, potatoes and strawberries. Participants also asked for cucumbers, onions, peppers, carrots, raspberries, greens, squash, eggplant and chiles.

Related: Free gardening classes begin March 12, 2019, at Bethany Community Garden

“This experience was really eye-opening for me,” Yeh said. “I was able to gain ‘real-life’ experience. Although I learned a lot in class, textbooks don’t teach you about the possible mistakes you could make or how to prepare for obstacles. There were many mistakes I made in this process and things I could have done better, but ultimately, I learned from them.”

Yeh points to some data collection difficulties that prevented the reporting of demographic information.

“Experiencing failure, especially when you are working for a good and real cause, really provides insight and experience that I will never forget,” Yeh said. “It will allow me to prepare and perform at a higher level the next time I do something like this.”

Other SoIndy action teams include Community Building, Connectivity, Education and Workforce Development, Housing, Madison Avenue Corridor, and Shelby Street Corridor.  

Both Wojtyna and Yeh encourage others to get involved in the SoIndy efforts. Several of Wojtyna’s students – both undergrad and graduate – have done projects with the organization, ranging from a one-time afternoon to a semester-long commitment.

“All in all, SoIndy is there to make Indianapolis a better place,” Yeh said. “There’s nothing more rewarding than knowing you helped make a positive change and actually witness it.”

Written by Amy Magan, communications manager for the Center for Aging & Community and the College of Health Sciences.

Sport Management grad student scores job with Pacers

JSpringer2019 is already an exciting year for Jacob Springer, Master of Sport Management student in the Department of Kinesiology, Health, and Sport Sciences. Not only will he graduate with his classmates this summer, he is starting the new year with a new title: Consumer Sales Executive at the Indiana Pacers.

“I will be working as a sales rep for the Pacers, helping to sell season ticket packages and servicing clients who attend games,” said Springer.

Springer has been preparing for this job since he first stepped on campus. After graduating from Indiana University with a major in Sports Marketing and Management and minors in business, law, and marketing, he contemplated his options and chose to enroll in UIndy’s sport management master’s program “because it was flexible, allowing me to work full-time as an intern and now as a full-time employee,” Springer said. “UIndy is near a lot of different sports organizations and allowed me to look for opportunities here in town while I was in grad school.”

Not only is Indianapolis a great location for the sports industry, UIndy offered Springer the chance to work with Dr. Jennifer VanSickle, director of the undergraduate and graduate sport management programs, as a graduate assistant.

“Working with Dr. VanSickle has given me opportunities to branch out and connect with and meet new people that have grown my network.”

In fact, Springer’s network has expanded to the Indy Sports Business Conference, an event the UIndy sport management program will host at Banker’s Life Fieldhouse on April 1. “I have been working closely with (VanSickle) to secure panelists for the event, reach out to potential students and attendees, as well as help secure the event venue and setup,” said Springer.

Springer attributes his professional growth and success to the great support he has received from the MSSM program. The best part? “The flexibility and the people I have gotten to network with so far.”

UIndy would like to wish Springer – and the Indiana Pacers — the best of luck.

-Written by Olivia Horvath ’20 (doctorate of occupational therapy)

Two students earn top honors in University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra Concerto Competition

The University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra Concerto Competition held Jan. 29, 2019, recognized the wide-ranging talent of students in the Department of Music and honored a winner and runner-up.

Lucy Shirley

Lucy Shirley

Lucy Shirley ’20, a piano performance major with a music composition concentration, won the competition for her rendition of the Rondo all´Ungherese from Franz Joseph Haydn’s Piano Concerto D Major, Hob. XVIII:11. Gavin Craig ’20 (music therapy) was chosen as runner-up for his performance of Pierre Max Dubois’ Concerto for Alto Saxophone and Orchestra.

Ten students participated in the competition, with faculty Greg Martin, assistant professor, Haruka Ostojic, assistant professor, and Brandon Vos ’18 (music performance) as accompanists. Faculty judges were Rebecca Sorley, professor, Jennifer Howlett, adjunct, and conductor Ariel Rudiakov, adjunct.

Shirley, who is also a Franco-Germanic Studies minor with an Honors concentration, called the chance to participate in the Concerto Competition a “wonderful gift.”

“When participating in any competition, of course, you hope to win, but the UIndy music department is so full of talented musicians that I truly wasn’t expecting to. It was such a nice surprise!” said Shirley, who plans to participate in the Charles Joray Piano Competition in March.

Shirley, a graduate of Irvington Preparatory Academy in Indianapolis, credits her teacher and mentor, Sharon Parr, associate professor, in guiding her instruction, among numerous faculty mentors.

“I’ve grown so much in technique, musicality and artistic centeredness by studying piano with her. I absolutely could not have won the competition without her tutelage and encouraging support!” said Shirley.

I am so delighted Lucy was able to share her love of this music and reap the reward of being named winner on top of it. Something that is special about Lucy is the way she conveys her joy in music and life when she sits at the keyboard. It makes the experience that much more engaging and meaningful for those who listen,” Parr said.

Shirley will perform Haydn’s Piano Concerto no.11 in D major with the University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Ariel Rudiakov, at 4 p.m., April 7, 2019, at the Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center.

Gavin Craig

Gavin Craig

Gavin Craig, a Winchester Community High School graduate, said he loves the opportunity to step into the competition and be weighed against his peers.

“I competed in the competition last year where I was both the youngest, and the only woodwind! It doesn’t get any less daunting, though, because everyone is always bringing the best that they have to offer to the competition,” he said.

“I’m extremely proud and impressed by Gavin’s work ethic and overall musicianship. The greatest benefit of any music competition is the growth a given student achieves through preparation,” said Scotty Stepp, Craig’s instructor.

Learn more about the University of Indianapolis Department of Music.

 

15 UIndy students earn scholarships to impact public health

In addition to providing scholarships, the Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) also provides hands-on healthcare activities to students.

In addition to providing scholarships, the Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) also provides hands-on healthcare activities to students.

Four University of Indianapolis undergraduate students and 10 graduate students have a lighter financial load this semester, thanks to scholarships provided by the Indianapolis Health Careers Opportunities Program (HCOP). The program is run by the Metropolitan Indianapolis Central Indiana Area Health Education Center (MICI-AHEC), which is hosted by UIndy.

Undergraduate recipients each received $2,500. Eight graduate students received $7,500, while two received partial scholarships of $2,500. The scholarship recipients are:

Undergraduate – Jaylan Steele, Terria Beckett, Emma Zabor, and Sara Panczyk

Graduate –Alyssha Cloud, Mackenzie Sauer, Alexandria Goddard, Morgan Benjamin, Moriam Olorunoje, Sydney Elliott, Jasmine Everfield, Mikia Davis, Gracyn Burns, and Celine Siahmakoun.

“I am a public health major because public health careers are some of the most overlooked careers we have, and we need more public health workers. We need more people to help raise awareness of human trafficking, tobacco, and other drug addictions and more. Public health is how we can help solve these issues,” said Beckett.

To be eligible, students must attend an accredited college or university in Marion or the eight surrounding counties and must be currently enrolled in a health or allied health program pursuing a career in a health profession such as social work, occupational or physical therapy, clinical psychology or counseling, public health, or athletic training, among others. Pre-med and nursing students are not eligible. In addition, they must be from an economically or educationally disadvantaged background and have a desire to work in a medically underserved area.

The application process included several short essay questions, such as why they want to work in areas without good access to healthcare.

All communities deserve the right and ability to get medical resources, including underserved areas,” Goddard said. “As a social worker, it’s important to know the ways to help in underserved communities such as gathering resources, appropriate homes, food medications, and counseling services. There is a need for resources to help parents understand their rights and the paperwork that they are given. I hope to be the person to help students get to their destiny throughout my journey and career.”

Another round of HCOP INDY scholarships will open in February. Information about the scholarships will be posted on the MICI-AHEC website February 1, 2019.

Criminal justice brings new facility, faculty to campus

crime lab uindyCriminal justice is a growing, in-demand field and the University of Indianapolis is preparing students to meet those needs.

“Every course we teach has real world, experiential learning opportunities,” said Kevin Whiteacre, associate professor and chair of the Department of Criminal Justice.

The new Criminal Justice Education Lab is the first of its kind in the state, serving students, faculty and even agents from the Indianapolis-Marion County Forensic Services Agency who regularly visit campus to conduct tests and trainings. At the crime lab, students practice securing and evaluating a scene, interviewing witnesses and victims and gathering information: you name it. The crime lab is giving students a place to gain hands-on experience early in the program.

Another addition to the program: new faculty like Jim Perillo, who brings 42 years of asset protection and risk management experience to his loss prevention class, which is open to all majors.

“He’s bringing innovative ideas to the loss prevention program, which has been around for the last three years,” said Whiteacre.

Related: UIndy has one of the longest-running criminal justice programs in the state

Perillo says students from a variety of majors can benefit from the skills learned during the semester-long loss prevention course (CRIM 435).

“When you complete the loss prevention course, you get a certificate that’s good for life and that can give you an ‘in’ on interviews. The class is a great opportunity for business majors and for people interested in entrepreneurship among other things,” he said.

Skylar Hall ‘19 (criminal justice) plans to pursue a career in federal law enforcement and is taking the loss prevention class during the fall 2018 semester.

“I really enjoy the class and think it’s very informative and interesting,” he said. “It gives me a different perspective on criminal justice.”

Looking ahead, Whiteacre said, they plan to launch a freestanding minor in emergency and disaster management (EDM) for traditional undergraduates in Fall 2019. Every instructor for the minor will have firsthand experience as professionals in the field.

“EDM provides a breadth of experience for students. Unfortunately, emergencies and disasters aren’t going away, so this is an added value to anyone’s degree,” Whiteacre said. “If you’re studying public health, business, social work, nursing – this minor would be a nice compliment so you know how to work with first responders.”

Once students gain expertise within the classroom, faculty are ready to connect them with additional opportunities. Community partnerships with companies such as Simon Property Group facilitate meaningful relationships and internships for students in the program.

Learn more about the criminal justice program

Virtual Dementia Tour puts students in the shoes of those with dementia

dementiatour290You never truly know the plight of another person until you are walking in their shoes. The University of Indianapolis Center for Aging & Community gave students the opportunity to do just that during through the Virtual Dementia Tour (VDT), which was part of UIndy’s recent Interprofessional Education (IPE) Week. With the country’s number of baby boomers set to become the largest living adult generation, all students will likely interact with a person with dementia, whether as patient or a family member.

The VDT simulates the sensory disturbances experienced by people struggling with debilitating effects of dementia. The VDT takes place in a home-like environment, and participants are given a simple task to complete within a 3-minute time frame. Before entering the mock apartment on the 4th floor of the Health Pavilion, participants were given headphones, visual obstruction goggles, and oven mitts to simulate poor hand control.

Janette Hensleigh, a Master of Occupational Therapy student, remarked, “The headset with the background noise and the occasional fire siren paired with the obfuscating glasses did a great job of muddling both the instructions I was given and my awareness of things around me.”

These multi-sensory disturbances are a normal daily occurrence to the millions of people living with dementia worldwide.

“This immersion into the world of a person with dementia has the ability to change perspectives of healthcare professionals across all fields,” said Kayleigh Adrian, CAC project coordinator. “The virtual dementia tour allows the student to switch their perspective from knowledge about a disease to true compassion for another person.”

dementiaglovesThe students who participated found that the short experience in the apartment will change their mindset for the long term. Samantha Wallenberg, a Doctor of Occupational Therapy student, said the experience has allowed her to “be more mindful of those who have dementia and understand how to communicate with them better, as well as how to communicate with their family.” Her classmate, Nicole Scholl, agreed.

“If I ever work with a client who has dementia or even memory loss, I am going to be patient and understanding with them,” Scholl said. “I will also be advocating for people with dementia when interacting with their caregivers and other people because what people with dementia are going through is very difficult and challenging.”

Each participant’s reflection had a common theme: frustration. Scholl was frustrated when “I forgot what I was doing and I could not find anything. By the time I found what I was looking for I forgot why I needed the object in the first place.”

This emotional experience led Hensleigh to rethink how she interacts with not only patients, but family members. “I will definitely keep this experience in mind when I interact with people with dementia,” she said. “I have a family member in the early stage of dementia, and I will remember to keep questions or statements very simple so he can better understand.  I will keep that in mind when I work with people with cognitive deficits, too.”

Last month’s VDT received interest from students pursuing health careers, but the experience is open to all students, faculty, and staff. The VDT will be offered again in the Health Pavilion on Tuesday, November 13 from 5:00-6:30pm and again from 6:30-8:00pm. Space is limited and reservations can be made online here.

Written by Olivia Horvath ’20 (OTD)

Public health students present at national conference

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Public health students and faculty from the University of Indianapolis presented advocacy strategies to reduce gun violence at the Society for Public Health Advocacy (SOPHE) Advocacy Summit in October. The national event, hosted in Washington, D.C., brought students and professionals together to advance the discussion of firearm-related violence as it relates to public health.

The UIndy delegation included Master of Public Health (MPH) students Yordanos Gebru and Shawn Schweitzer, undergraduate Megan Davish, and MPH Program Director Dr. Heidi Hancher-Rauch. Their presentation, “Strategies for the Novice Advocate: Creating Advocacy Plans to Fight Gun Violence,” provided a toolkit for professionals to make a difference in their community.

Dr. Hancher-Rauch, who serves as co-chair for SOPHE’s Advocacy Committee, says the access to professional opportunities that the public health program offers is central to her students’ success.

“We worked together on the whole process, from start to finish,” she said. “Attending the conference is important, but often students don’t have the opportunity to see behind-the-scenes of a professional experience. This takes their learning to the next level … These are the opportunities I would have liked to have as a graduate student.”

Learn more about the Master of Public Health program and the undergraduate Public Health Education & Promotion program

Presenting on such a hot-button issue at the national level was at first an intimidating prospect for Schweitzer. But he knew there was no turning back once their abstract was accepted.

“Not a lot of people want to talk about things like this, but it needs to be discussed,” he said. “This was a perfect opportunity to get out of my comfort zone.”

This conference was one opportunity among many for Schweitzer to engage with his field outside of the classroom.  For example, he is developing an after-school program to help area high-school students utilize coping skills in the face of stress.

“It’s amazing how much hands-on work we get to do. It has given me a lot to think about—what kinds of projects do I want to continue working on after I graduate?”

Hailing from Ethiopia, Gebru plans to attend medical school after earning her graduate degree.

“The MPH program has shown me the different factors that affect the overall health of a population—policies, programs, health education,” Gebru said. “Problems are more expansive than simple explanations like a lack of doctors or health facilities.”

Dr. Heidi Hancher-Rauch can be contacted at rauchh@uindy.edu.

Written by Logan McGrady, Communications Specialist for Graduate & Adult Learning Enrollment.

Artist-in-Residence Drew Petersen creates unique learning opportunities for piano students

Drew Petersen master piano class - February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Drew Petersen master piano class – February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

INDIANAPOLIS – Music students at the University of Indianapolis are reaping the benefits of an artist-in-residence program that connects them with unique learning experiences and a global professional network.

Drew Petersen, 2017 American Pianists Awards winner, Christel DeHaan fellow and University of Indianapolis artist-in-residence, has held masterclasses, private coachings, lectures and performances as part of the partnership between the American Pianists Association and the University.

Petersen returns in October for a performance at the Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center Oct. 29, followed by master classes throughout the week that serve as a catalyst for students in the University’s music program.

Learn more about the University of Indianapolis Department of Music programs.

Drew Petersen master piano class with UIndy students at CDFAC on the Ruth Lilly Perfomance Hall stage on Wednesday, February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

A cum laude graduate of Harvard University in social sciences, Petersen pursued undergraduate and graduate studies in music at the Juilliard School. He also has been a prizewinner in major international competitions and has been profiled in the New York Times, New York Magazine and the documentary Just Normal.

Petersen said interacting with the talented music students on campus has been one of the biggest rewards of his new connection to the University.

“Whenever I interact with the students and faculty, I am reminded that each day at UIndy is an opportunity to explore great music together and examine and innovate the best ways we can share it with the community. I’ve been having a great time, and I look forward to all that lies ahead,” Petersen said.

Drew Petersen master piano class with UIndy students at CDFAC on the Ruth Lilly Perfomance Hall stage on Wednesday, February 14, 2018. (Photo: D. Todd Moore, University of Indianapolis)

Students also have enjoyed Petersen’s mentorship. During her masterclass with Petersen, Carrie Atkinson ’18 (music – piano) was inspired by his remarkable playing technique and personable approach.

“Drew brought an excitement to the music that was inspiring to see as well as some wonderful insights to the music that reinforced what my teachers had already been instructing me in,” Atkinson said.

Richard Ratliff, professor of music, said Petersen’s fall 2017 performance on campus demonstrated the kind of grace under pressure that he encourages in his students.

“After our week with Drew, students approached the remainder of the semester with energy and enthusiasm. Students now realize that such mastery is a step-by-step process,” Ratliff explained.

Cole Snapp ’18 (music – piano, composition concentration) had a private lesson and a masterclass with Petersen and found both experiences to be motivational.

“Having an amazingly proficient pianist like Drew coach me was extremely valuable. He was able to bring things to my attention that I would not have otherwise thought. In a Zoltan Kodàly piece I was working on, he asked me to play the climactic section louder and louder until I was literally throwing my whole weight into the keys,” Snapp said.

“Since Drew is not much older than our students, his command in public presentation really made an impact. His expertise in a wide variety of repertoire — from the 18th century to the present — was apparent to everyone as he worked with students and spoke insightfully about the music he performs and is planning to record,” Ratliff said.

Atkinson said she’s grateful for the partnership between the APA and the University.

“I think that it is so enriching to get to work with musicians of his calibre. Drew is one of the top pianists on the scene right now, and getting to work with him was a very valuable and fresh experience. The best part, for me, was seeing how excited he got about the music,” she said.

Written by Sara Galer, Senior Communications Specialist, University of Indianapolis. Contact newsdesk@uindy.edu with your campus news.

Master of Science in Sport Management off to a record start

UIndy MSSM students benefit from the faculty's positive relationships with the NCAA. Sometimes that even means having class at NCAA headquarters.

UIndy MSSM students benefit from the faculty’s positive relationships with the NCAA. Sometimes that even means having class at NCAA headquarters.

The new school year is off to a blockbuster start for the Master of Science in Sport Management (MSSM) program. The program, which is housed in the Department of Kinesiology, Health, and Sport Sciences, welcomed nearly two dozen new students this year – more than twice the size of any previous MSSM cohort.

Jennifer VanSickle, program director for both the undergraduate and graduate sport management programs, has some ideas for why the program is enjoying such a boost in enrollment.

“We made the master’s program more accessible,” she said, noting that applicants who posted at least a 3.0 GPA in their undergrad degree are no longer required to take the GRE. “The change in the admissions procedures puts us more in line with other sport management programs in the state.”

UIndy’s geography is also a draw for many students. The proximity to the NCAA headquarters and professional sports teams including the Pacers, Colts, and Indy Eleven –and the university’s working relationships with these organizations – is a plus for students seeking careers in the sports industry.

“We require two internships with a sports organization,” VanSickle said. “So our students gain valuable experience and have plenty of opportunities to network.”

Jessie Benner is in her second and final year of the sport management master’s program. Her internship experiences include a community relations internship with the WNBA franchise team, the Indiana Fever, and a championships and alliances ticketing experience at the NCAA.

“Both of my internship experiences have given me the opportunity to foster positive
relationships with those around me while expanding my network,” Benner said. “I am able to interact with and learn from leaders within the sports industry, at both the collegiate and professional levels. The hands-on experience of internships also allows me to strengthen my skills as look to enter the workforce in the near future.”

The internships, as well as class assignments, help MSSM students understand the rigorous nature of the world of sport management.

“A lot of people want to work in sports because it’s glamorous and they want to work in an
industry that matches their passions,” VanSickle said. “But the hours are long and most of the work is behind the scenes, so much that you might not actually get to see the ‘scenes.’ You have to work your way up before you can sit in the club suite and hobknob.”

Students don’t just have to take VanSickle’s word for it. Each MSSM student is paired with a sports industry mentor. Benner’s mentor is Kellie Leeman, senior director of ticket sales and service at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS).

“Kellie has experience in several areas of sport, including the NCAA and IMS,” Benner said.

“Since I’m still unsure about what career path I want to take, Kellie’s knowledge of different areas is very helpful. We meet once a month to discuss developments on my end; she has offered me great insights. I really value her opinion.”

Prior to working as a mentor, Leeman collaborated with VanSickle to collaborated to develop the NCAA externship program several years ago.

“I really enjoyed working with the UIndy students through that program,” said Leeman, who joined the staff at IMS in 2016. “The sport management mentor program was another great opportunity for me to work with UIndy students.”

Leeman offered this advice to sport management students, “Network and seek as many different types of experiences as you can so you can learn what you like and don’t like about the industry.”

VanSickle also emphasized that the responsibility for networking and taking advantage of all the MSSM program offers lies with the student.

“We set the table for them; they have to close the deal.”

Written by Amy Magan, communications manager for the Center for Aging & Community and the College of Health Sciences.

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