UIndy faculty member treats “So You Think You Can Dance” performers

Salamh_SYTYCD2019

When the stars of So You Think You Can Dance Live rolled into Indianapolis last week, UIndy’s Dr. Paul Salamh, assistant professor in the Krannert School of Physical Therapy, was waiting for them. No, he’s not a SYTYCD super-fan. Salamh was onsite as a healthcare professional, available to treat any injuries the dancers came in with.

“The performers do multiple shows a week, so they often come in with injuries or even just “maintenance” needs,” said Salamh, who has been the go-to physical therapist for the tour stop in Indianapolis for three years. “But its show business and the show must go on.”

He was recruited for the role by the show’s manager who learned about Salamh’s previous work with athletes. At the Old National Center where the show was held, each year Salamh is given a large dressing room so he has space to treat the dancers. He brings along any supplies he thinks he might need. In order to prepare, the show’s manager gives him a heads up of what to expect a few days before the cast and crew arrive in Indianapolis.

“The day of the show, the lead dancer usually briefs me about what’s going on with everyone,” Salamh said. “Sometimes they are reluctant to come in for treatment, but usually the lead dancer encourages them.”

He spends up to five hours treating members of the 10-person cast. This year’s cast included Season 16’s Top 10 including Anna Linstruth, Benjamin Castro, Bailey Munoz, Eddie Hoyt, Ezra Sosa, Gino Cosculluela, Madison Jordan, Mariah Russell, Sophie Pittman and Stephanie Sosa plus All-Stars Cyrus Spencer and Lauren Froderman.

Before being contacted by the SYTYCD team, Salamh had never actually seen the show. However, since then he does admit to following the show a little more closely, “but don’t tell anyone,” he laughed.

UIndy announces new Logistics Learning Lab

The University of Indianapolis and Vincennes University are announcing a partnership between the University of Indianapolis School of Business, Department of Operations and Supply Chain Management and the Vincennes University Logistics Training & Education Center (VU LTEC). This partnership aims to provide educational training experiences with VU LTEC’s cutting-edge technology and industry-tested equipment through warehousing simulation exercises conducted by VU LTEC staff at VU LTEC’s 30,000 square foot warehouse facility located in Plainfield, Indiana. 

The UIndy Logistics Learning Lab, located inside VU LTEC, will allow University students to participate in lab simulations which have been developed by VU LTEC staff and Dr. Craig Seidelson, assistant professor of operations and supply chain management. Simulations in the Lab will encompass activities like unloadingsoftware assisted fulfillment, and operating packaging automation, transportation management and working with other warehouse equipment. 

Undergraduate students will spend between three and six hours in the Lab per term, with graduate students potentially exceeding that.

The genesis of this partnership occurred in 2017 when Seidelson approached VU LTEC about his students utilizing the VU LTEC space to supplement their classroom learning. “I wanted a place where students could learn about logistics outside of a classroom,” Seidelson says. “The easiest way to teach it is actually in a warehouse.”

UIndy supply chain management students were previously getting their first hands-on experience during their applied business projects, which they conducted completing in actual warehouses for companies around Indianapolis. But Seidelson found that there was too large of a jump from the classroom to the warehouse.

“What I found was the gap between the classroom and the real world was wide when it comes to logistics,” Seidelson says. “And the new UIndy Logistics Learning Lab will bridge that gap.”

“We’re going to put students in lab, put their education into practice, and once they understand things in that lab, that will make them much more capable when doing their applied business projects with actual clients.”

Larry Belcher, dean of the School of Business, added, “The UIndy School of Business curriculum is built around applied learning using industry tools.  This is another way in which we are preparing our students to make a seamless transition into their chosen careers.” 

The Lab makes the UIndy supply chain curriculum unique among schools in Indiana. Seidelson says that there are no other four-year supply chain programs where the university is offering a laboratory for the study of logistics.

Each simulation in the Lab is a competition amongst teams. Students are graded on specific objectives, completion time, pick/pack accuracy and more. In the lab exercises, there is intentionally very little instruction in hopes that the students will learn by doing with a debriefing period at the conclusion of the exercise. 

“The point is to be creative. Learn from your mistakes, through the mistakes of others,” Seidelson says. “The key is putting the education into practice. It’s messy, it’s dirty and things rarely work exactly as expected. We want to prepare the students for real-world experiences.”

About Vincennes University Logistics Training & Education Center

Vincennes University Logistics Training and Education Center (VU LTEC) located in Plainfield, Indiana, has a mission devoted to developing and delivering industry-approved education and training programs that meet the ever-increasing demands of employers in the logistics industry. VU LTEC is dedicated to providing high-quality training through a blended learning environment, encompassing classroom, online and hands-on instruction that will enable VU LTEC students to graduate with certifications, degrees and real-world experience.

About the School of Business

Applied learning is the key to the University of Indianapolis School of Business supply chain management curriculum. From managing “back-office” tasks, to meeting objectives in the warehouse setting, University of Indianapolis School of Business students “learn by doing.” Both undergraduate and graduate courses are taught by dedicated faculty, many of whom bring years of real-world experience to the classroom. Outside the classroom, students gain valuable internship experiences at nearly 100 different businesses each year and are well-prepared to enter the job market or advance in their careers upon graduation.

Savannah Phipps ’21 (biology) presents at ESA conference

Savannah Phipps ’21 (biology) recently gave an oral presentation of her research at the Ecological Society of America (ESA) annual meeting in Louisville, KY.  ESA is the largest and most prominent disciplinary society of ecology, the study of the interactions of organisms with each other and their environments.  The ESA annual meeting hosts 5000-6000 attendees each year mostly from the United States, Canada, Mexico, and various countries of South America, Europe, and Asia.
The research study sought to determine if differences in ploidy (i.e., the number of genome copies in their cells) between individuals of Claytonia virginica (spring beauty) caused differences in phenotype and reproduction.  Diploid individuals (with two genome copies per cell) were smaller in leaf and flower measures but had greater reproduction than triploid individuals (with three genome copies per cell).  No individuals of hybrid ploidy, which theoretically are possible, have been found, suggesting a barrier to diploid-triploid reproduction.  Investigations of habitat distribution, flower development, and pollinator behavior suggest that gamete incompatibility or hybrid inviability prevent diploid-triploid hybridization.
Savannah’s research and presentation were supported by the Indiana Academy of Science, UIndy’s Research Fellows Program, a Shaheen College of Arts & Sciences Student Career Readiness and Leadership grant, the Office of the Provost, and her research advisor Dr. Daniel Scholes (assistant professor, biology).  The study was conducted in Morgan-Monroe State Forest.

Sidekicks kicking down the door

sidekick

Would Sherlock Holmes have been the world’s greatest detective without Dr. Watson? Could Batman keep Gotham City safe without Robin? Could Frodo have made it to Mt. Doom without Sam? Could the Avengers have stopped Thanos without the help of countless sidekicks along the way like Falcon, Bucky, Iron Patriot and Wong?

Despite the fact that sidekicks have played an integral role for many of pop culture’s most famous heroes, they have remained underdeveloped in literary and critical study. University of Indianapolis assistant professor of English Stephen Zimmerly has examined how the role of the sidekick is ever-expanding in modern media in his new book “The Sidekick Comes of Age: How Young Adult Literature is Shifting the Sidekick Paradigm.”

For Zimmerly, this is a passion that started early in life. “I remember that even as a kid, I would always pretend to be Robin, not Batman,” he said. “From a professional standpoint, I became interested in sidekick characters when I realized that sidekicks very seldom received any focused attention as the main subjects of literary study.

“When it suited their purposes, scholars would mention or use sidekicks, but always as a means to illustrate some larger issue, and the sidekick would exist as a colorful footnote.”

Zimmerly,_Steve (1)Zimmerly has noted that young adult literature has embraced the sidekick – recognizing the way the character can reflect the importance of growth and finding one’s place in the world. In this type of literature, authors are finding ways to add complexity to sidekick characterization. Tactics used to accomplish this include letting sidekicks “evolve” over the course of multiple books or perhaps even using parallel novels telling the story from the sidekick’s perspective. 

A specific story-type gaining traction in young adult literature right now is the superhero sidekick who tells the story from his or her point of view. These books often explain life as a sidekick, but also show how even potentially-superpowered teens experience ordinary teenage difficulties. “Very often, sidekicks are also on the cusp of moving from the ‘passenger seat’ to the ‘driver’s seat,’” Zimmerly explains, “just like the teenagers reading the books who face leaving home for the first time are on the cusp of independence.

Learn more about the University of Indianapolis Department of English.

“Because many sidekicks are young adults, it makes perfect sense for young adult fiction to tell these kinds of stories.” 

So what is the appeal of the sidekick? What leads authors and their readers to want to explore how sidekicks fit in their narratives? Zimmerly has a theory. “It is almost easier to perceive ourselves as the sidekicks,” he says. “Maybe we’re not the strongest, or the fastest, or the smartest – and usually the sidekick isn’t either.”

Giving the readers the ability to place themselves in the story is how the sidekick was first utilized in comic books. Again, because most sidekicks were far younger than the main characters, it gave younger readers someone their own age to relate to.

Zimmerly sees young adult literature as the ideal testing ground to explore new ways to write and challenge norms. “Young adult fiction has historically given its authors a lot of freedom in what they write and how they write it,” he said. “These authors can play with any number of conventions more easily and with more freedom than an author writing for more conventional, adult audiences.”

As young adult literature continues to grow in popularity, more and more of these stories will likely be told, which will continue a growing emphasis on characteristically complex sidekick characters. For more information on Zimmerly’s book “The Sidekick Comes of Age: How Young Adult Literature is Shifting the Sidekick Paradigm,” click here.

UIndy engineering students earn top awards at ASEE conference

Screenshot 2019-04-04 22.04.35Twenty engineering students and ten engineering faculty attended the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Illinois-Indiana Section Conference for 2019 hosted by the University of Evansville in March.

From a field that included students from universities from around the region including Purdue University, students from the R.B. Annis School of Engineering at the University of Indianapolis took home both first- and second-place poster presentation awards. (See a complete list of the winning teams below.)

“It was a great experience to be able to share our project with other engineering professionals and experts,” said Marko Tasic ’21 (industrial and systems engineering).

Students participating in the conference are from the sophomore level ENGR 298 – Engineering Design Lab IV and junior level ENGR 398 – Engineering Design Lab IV, both core classes of the DesignSpine curriculum that emphasizes project-oriented courses with practical, hands-on experience and collaboration on real-world projects.

Joseph B. Herzog is the lead instructor and course coordinator for ENGR 298 and David Olawale is the lead instructor and course coordinator for ENGR 398. Teaching both of these courses is a team effort from all of faculty in the R.B. Annis School of Engineering. Student teams meet with engineering faculty members each week to discuss project status and also consult with faculty outside of class time for technical assistance.

Screenshot 2019-04-04 22.06.19“What I love about this class is that when I walk into the machine shop during the class period, I see a diverse group of students working on multiple different projects. Some students are welding, others are cutting steel, and others are working on the mill. This is a great experience that connects students with external customers, enables students to use their technical engineering skills to design the project, but also give students the opportunities for hands-on work, that will make them better engineers,” Herzog said.

Olawale said the focus during the junior year of the DesignSpine sequence is “entrepreneurial mindset development in our engineering students. Our students are not only developing critical technical skills like engineering design, they are also developing the capacity to identify and exploit needs as opportunities to create value for different stakeholders. Such is the case for our student team that took first position. They are developing a software product that will help universities in assessing the value of the education they are providing.”

List of 2019 ASEE IL-IN Section Award Winners:

Outstanding Poster Awards

1st Place:

“Return on Investment On A University Education: Development of An Analytical Software Tool”

Student Team Members:

  • Joshua Love ’20 (software engineering) 
  • Kristians Kanders ’20 (software engineering) 
  • Kinsey West ’20 (industrial & systems engineering)
  • Ante Lucev ’20 (software engineering) 

2nd Place:

“Design and Fabrication of a Custom Wrist Orthosis for Enhanced Patient Comfort”

Student Team Members:

  • Marko Tasic ’21 (industrial & systems engineering)
  • Matthew Hansen ’21 (mechanical engineering and engineering)
  • Mang Lian ’21 (mechanical engineering)
  • Demetre Mitchell ’21 (mechanical engineering)

University of Indianapolis study points to positive impact of father-child play

Fathers who play with their young children are making an impact that lasts well beyond childhood, a new study from the University of Indianapolis has found.

The study, “Father-child play, child emotional dysregulation, and adolescent internalizing symptoms: A longitudinal multiple mediation analysis,” was published in Development & Psychopathology’s December 2018 edition. Jenifer Gregory ’17 (Psy.D., clinical psychology) ’14 (M.A., clinical psychology) authored the paper, with University of Indianapolis faculty Katie Kivisto and Neil Perdue as co-authors, along with David Estell of Indiana University. The paper was based on Gregory’s doctoral dissertation and is her first research publication in a scientific journal.

Jenifer Gregory

Jenifer Gregory

Gregory, who is now in private practice as a clinical psychologist at Continuum: Mental Health & Wellness in Indianapolis, said the research supports that “positive and supportive father-child relationships are very important for healthy child development.”

One way to measure those relationships is by the quality of father-child interactions during play time. The researchers found that children who have fathers who play with them “in a manner that is sensitive, supportive, emotionally attuned, attentive and challenging without being overstimulating are more likely to learn how to effectively self-regulate or cope with their emotions,” Gregory explained. This finding was true even after researchers accounted for factors like family income and quality of the mother-child relationship.

Father-child play also helps with long-term emotional growth, the study found, with the quality of those interactions predicting kids’ positive development through adolescence.

“The kids who had better quality play with their dads in first grade were better at emotion regulation in third grade and had less depression as 15-year-olds,” Kivisto said.

The study pulled data from a national data set of early childcare and youth development, commissioned by National Institute of Child Health and Development and conducted at various sites throughout the country.

“Based on our findings, fathers in particular (and parents in general) should encourage and engage in this type of positive, child-centered and child-directed play in order to support children’s emotional development,” Gregory said.

With state and national initiatives aimed at getting fathers more involved with their children, Kivisto said the research can be useful for agencies and community support networks that provide parenting advice.

Katie Kivisto

Katie Kivisto

“What dads are doing is making an impact and shaping kids’ development. We want to remind them that play is really important, and goes hand-in-hand with meeting basic needs and discipline,” Kivisto said.

Kivisto’s clinical and research background in parent-child attachment and emotional regulation development matched Gregory’s academic interests as she pursued a dissertation topic. Kivisto connected Gregory to Neil Perdue, associate professor of psychology, vice president and chief operating officer, to gain access to a database that proved crucial to the research.

“As we looked through the data that had become available to us, it became clear that we should utilize the study’s observations of father-child play as a measure of relationship quality because this type of observation is so rarely utilized,” Gregory said.

Gregory said her coursework, research and practicum training at UIndy prepared her for her current work with children and families.

“It guides my interventions with families in that I strive to involve parents, and particularly fathers, in the process of working with children. I emphasize the importance of the type of child-centered, child-directed, sensitive and supportive play that we found to be so important for child emotional development,” she said.

Kivisto points out that the sample used in the study happened to involve biological fathers, but the researchers are respectful of the fact that not every family has a biological father involved. The key takeaway for parents is to make sure that they take the time to play with children on a regular basis.

“Parents can feel stressed by the idea of adding one more thing to their to-do list,” Kivisto noted, “But research shows that even 5-10 minutes a day of this kind of play can improve child behavior and wellbeing.”

Written by Sara Galer, University of Indianapolis communications manager.

 

South Indy benefits from fruits of UIndy faculty and student labors

The South Indy Quality of Life Plan (SoIndy) is a volunteer organization made up of community residents in eight neighborhoods, including University Heights surrounding the University of Indianapolis, working to bring better quality living to the area. Amie Wojtyna, assistant professor in public health and a University Heights resident, chairs the SoIndy Health and Wellness Action Team, which focuses largely on food insecurity.

“I got involved because I live in this community,” Wojtyna said. “Food insecurity is one of my areas of interest. Most of the SoIndy community is in a food desert.”

Wojtyna’s action team has been integral in bringing to life the community gardens at Bethany Lutheran Church. In addition to providing plots for neighbors to grow their own produce, much of the harvest from the gardens is donated to two local food pantries.

Sean Yeh ’18 (public health education and promotion), worked with SoIndy to help identify what kind of produce patrons of the food pantries were most interested in receiving. Yeh, who was a student of Wojtyna’s, collected input from 139 patrons of Servant’s Heart and Hunger, Inc. food pantries, as well as from Bethany Lutheran’s Learning Ministry. The top three vote-getters in Yeh’s survey were tomatoes, potatoes and strawberries. Participants also asked for cucumbers, onions, peppers, carrots, raspberries, greens, squash, eggplant and chiles.

Related: Free gardening classes begin March 12, 2019, at Bethany Community Garden

“This experience was really eye-opening for me,” Yeh said. “I was able to gain ‘real-life’ experience. Although I learned a lot in class, textbooks don’t teach you about the possible mistakes you could make or how to prepare for obstacles. There were many mistakes I made in this process and things I could have done better, but ultimately, I learned from them.”

Yeh points to some data collection difficulties that prevented the reporting of demographic information.

“Experiencing failure, especially when you are working for a good and real cause, really provides insight and experience that I will never forget,” Yeh said. “It will allow me to prepare and perform at a higher level the next time I do something like this.”

Other SoIndy action teams include Community Building, Connectivity, Education and Workforce Development, Housing, Madison Avenue Corridor, and Shelby Street Corridor.  

Both Wojtyna and Yeh encourage others to get involved in the SoIndy efforts. Several of Wojtyna’s students – both undergrad and graduate – have done projects with the organization, ranging from a one-time afternoon to a semester-long commitment.

“All in all, SoIndy is there to make Indianapolis a better place,” Yeh said. “There’s nothing more rewarding than knowing you helped make a positive change and actually witness it.”

Written by Amy Magan, communications manager for the Center for Aging & Community and the College of Health Sciences.

Sport Management grad student scores job with Pacers

JSpringer2019 is already an exciting year for Jacob Springer, Master of Sport Management student in the Department of Kinesiology, Health, and Sport Sciences. Not only will he graduate with his classmates this summer, he is starting the new year with a new title: Consumer Sales Executive at the Indiana Pacers.

“I will be working as a sales rep for the Pacers, helping to sell season ticket packages and servicing clients who attend games,” said Springer.

Springer has been preparing for this job since he first stepped on campus. After graduating from Indiana University with a major in Sports Marketing and Management and minors in business, law, and marketing, he contemplated his options and chose to enroll in UIndy’s sport management master’s program “because it was flexible, allowing me to work full-time as an intern and now as a full-time employee,” Springer said. “UIndy is near a lot of different sports organizations and allowed me to look for opportunities here in town while I was in grad school.”

Not only is Indianapolis a great location for the sports industry, UIndy offered Springer the chance to work with Dr. Jennifer VanSickle, director of the undergraduate and graduate sport management programs, as a graduate assistant.

“Working with Dr. VanSickle has given me opportunities to branch out and connect with and meet new people that have grown my network.”

In fact, Springer’s network has expanded to the Indy Sports Business Conference, an event the UIndy sport management program will host at Banker’s Life Fieldhouse on April 1. “I have been working closely with (VanSickle) to secure panelists for the event, reach out to potential students and attendees, as well as help secure the event venue and setup,” said Springer.

Springer attributes his professional growth and success to the great support he has received from the MSSM program. The best part? “The flexibility and the people I have gotten to network with so far.”

UIndy would like to wish Springer – and the Indiana Pacers — the best of luck.

-Written by Olivia Horvath ’20 (doctorate of occupational therapy)

Two students earn top honors in University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra Concerto Competition

The University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra Concerto Competition held Jan. 29, 2019, recognized the wide-ranging talent of students in the Department of Music and honored a winner and runner-up.

Lucy Shirley

Lucy Shirley

Lucy Shirley ’20, a piano performance major with a music composition concentration, won the competition for her rendition of the Rondo all´Ungherese from Franz Joseph Haydn’s Piano Concerto D Major, Hob. XVIII:11. Gavin Craig ’20 (music therapy) was chosen as runner-up for his performance of Pierre Max Dubois’ Concerto for Alto Saxophone and Orchestra.

Ten students participated in the competition, with faculty Greg Martin, assistant professor, Haruka Ostojic, assistant professor, and Brandon Vos ’18 (music performance) as accompanists. Faculty judges were Rebecca Sorley, professor, Jennifer Howlett, adjunct, and conductor Ariel Rudiakov, adjunct.

Shirley, who is also a Franco-Germanic Studies minor with an Honors concentration, called the chance to participate in the Concerto Competition a “wonderful gift.”

“When participating in any competition, of course, you hope to win, but the UIndy music department is so full of talented musicians that I truly wasn’t expecting to. It was such a nice surprise!” said Shirley, who plans to participate in the Charles Joray Piano Competition in March.

Shirley, a graduate of Irvington Preparatory Academy in Indianapolis, credits her teacher and mentor, Sharon Parr, associate professor, in guiding her instruction, among numerous faculty mentors.

“I’ve grown so much in technique, musicality and artistic centeredness by studying piano with her. I absolutely could not have won the competition without her tutelage and encouraging support!” said Shirley.

I am so delighted Lucy was able to share her love of this music and reap the reward of being named winner on top of it. Something that is special about Lucy is the way she conveys her joy in music and life when she sits at the keyboard. It makes the experience that much more engaging and meaningful for those who listen,” Parr said.

Shirley will perform Haydn’s Piano Concerto no.11 in D major with the University of Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Ariel Rudiakov, at 4 p.m., April 7, 2019, at the Ruth Lilly Performance Hall, Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center.

Gavin Craig

Gavin Craig

Gavin Craig, a Winchester Community High School graduate, said he loves the opportunity to step into the competition and be weighed against his peers.

“I competed in the competition last year where I was both the youngest, and the only woodwind! It doesn’t get any less daunting, though, because everyone is always bringing the best that they have to offer to the competition,” he said.

“I’m extremely proud and impressed by Gavin’s work ethic and overall musicianship. The greatest benefit of any music competition is the growth a given student achieves through preparation,” said Scotty Stepp, Craig’s instructor.

Learn more about the University of Indianapolis Department of Music.

 

15 UIndy students earn scholarships to impact public health

In addition to providing scholarships, the Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) also provides hands-on healthcare activities to students.

In addition to providing scholarships, the Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP) also provides hands-on healthcare activities to students.

Four University of Indianapolis undergraduate students and 10 graduate students have a lighter financial load this semester, thanks to scholarships provided by the Indianapolis Health Careers Opportunities Program (HCOP). The program is run by the Metropolitan Indianapolis Central Indiana Area Health Education Center (MICI-AHEC), which is hosted by UIndy.

Undergraduate recipients each received $2,500. Eight graduate students received $7,500, while two received partial scholarships of $2,500. The scholarship recipients are:

Undergraduate – Jaylan Steele, Terria Beckett, Emma Zabor, and Sara Panczyk

Graduate –Alyssha Cloud, Mackenzie Sauer, Alexandria Goddard, Morgan Benjamin, Moriam Olorunoje, Sydney Elliott, Jasmine Everfield, Mikia Davis, Gracyn Burns, and Celine Siahmakoun.

“I am a public health major because public health careers are some of the most overlooked careers we have, and we need more public health workers. We need more people to help raise awareness of human trafficking, tobacco, and other drug addictions and more. Public health is how we can help solve these issues,” said Beckett.

To be eligible, students must attend an accredited college or university in Marion or the eight surrounding counties and must be currently enrolled in a health or allied health program pursuing a career in a health profession such as social work, occupational or physical therapy, clinical psychology or counseling, public health, or athletic training, among others. Pre-med and nursing students are not eligible. In addition, they must be from an economically or educationally disadvantaged background and have a desire to work in a medically underserved area.

The application process included several short essay questions, such as why they want to work in areas without good access to healthcare.

All communities deserve the right and ability to get medical resources, including underserved areas,” Goddard said. “As a social worker, it’s important to know the ways to help in underserved communities such as gathering resources, appropriate homes, food medications, and counseling services. There is a need for resources to help parents understand their rights and the paperwork that they are given. I hope to be the person to help students get to their destiny throughout my journey and career.”

Another round of HCOP INDY scholarships will open in February. Information about the scholarships will be posted on the MICI-AHEC website February 1, 2019.

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